IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 2, Issue 8, August 2014, Pg. 200-204

International Journal of Research in Information Technology (IJRIT) www.ijrit.com

ISSN 2001-5569

Survey on Data Clustering Er. Daljit Kaur Computer Faculty, B.M.G.S.S. School Raikot, Punjab, India [email protected] Abstract Clustering is a division of data into groups of similar objects. Each group consists of objects that are similar among them and dissimilar compared to objects of other groups. Clustering is the subject of active research in several fields such as statistics, pattern recognition, and machine learning. This survey focuses on clustering in data mining. Data mining adds to clustering the complications of very large datasets with very many attributes of different types. Keywords: Clustering process, key issues, data clustering.

1. Introduction Data clustering aims to organize a collection of data items into clusters, such that items within a cluster are more “similar” to each other than they are to items in the other clusters. Data clustering is an important unsupervised learning method. In clustering, a set of objects are classified into groups such that members of one group are similar to one another [11]. Clustering is a main task of explorative data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval and bioinformatics. There are many clustering algorithms. Two goals of clustering algorithms are determining good clusters and doing it efficiently. This paper provides a review on data clustering. Paper consists of 4 sections. Section 2 explains data clustering process. Key issues in data clustering are explained in Section 3. Section 4 elaborates different data clustering techniques. Finally, Section 5 concludes the paper.

2. Data Clustering Process The clustering process may result in different partitioning of a data set, depending on the specific criterion used for clustering. There is a need of preprocessing before assuming a clustering task in a data set. The basic steps to develop clustering process are presented in Fig. 1 and can be summarized as follows:

Feature selection: The goal of feature selection is to select properly the features on which clustering is to be performed so as to encode as much information as possible concerning the task of our interest. Thus, preprocessing of data may be necessary prior to their utilization in clustering task.

Clustering algorithm: This step refers to the choice of an algorithm that results in the definition of a good clustering scheme for a data set. A proximity measure and a clustering criterion mainly characterize a clustering algorithm as well as its efficiency to define a clustering scheme that fits the data set.

Er. Daljit Kaur, IJRIT

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 2, Issue 8, August 2014, Pg. 200-204

i) Proximity measure is a measure that quantifies how similar two data points are. In most of the cases, it is ensured that all selected features contribute equally to the computation of the proximity measure. ii) Clustering criterion. In this step, the clustering criterion is defined, which can be expressed via a cost function or some other type of rules. We should stress that we have to take into account the type of clusters that are expected to occur in the data set. A good clustering criterion leads to a partitioning that fits well the data set.

Validation of the results: The correctness of clustering algorithm results is verified using appropriate criteria and techniques. Clustering algorithms define clusters that are not known a priori, irrespective of the clustering methods, the final partition of data requires some kind of evaluation in most applications. Interpretation of the results: The experts in the application area have to integrate the clustering results with other experimental evidence and analysis in order to draw the right conclusion[10].

Fig 1. Data clustering process

3. Issues in Clustering Clustering remains a difficult problem in spite of the prevalence of such a large number of clustering algorithms, and its success in a number of different application domains. This can be attributed to the inherent vagueness in the definition of a cluster, and the difficulty in defining an appropriate similarity measure and objective function. The following fundamental challenges associated with clustering were highlighted in [2], which are relevant even to this date. (a) What is a cluster? (b) What features should be used? (c) Should the data be normalized? (d) Does the data contain any outliers? Er. Daljit Kaur, IJRIT

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 2, Issue 8, August 2014, Pg. 200-204

(e) How do we define the pair-wise similarity? (f) How many clusters are present in the data? (g) Which clustering method should be used? (h) Does the data have any clustering tendency? (i) Are the discovered clusters and partition valid?

4. Classification of Clustering Algorithm Classification of clustering algorithms is given below: 4.1 Partitional Clustering Partitional clustering aims to directly obtain a single partition of the collection of items into clusters. Partitioning methods relocate instances by moving them from one cluster to another, starting from an initial partitioning. Such methods typically require that the number of clusters will be pre-set by the user. Error Minimization Algorithms. These algorithms, which tend to work well with isolated and compact clusters, are the most frequently used methods. The basic idea is to find a clustering structure that minimizes a certain error criterion which measures the “distance” of each instance to its representative value. The most well-known criterion is the Sum of Squared Error (SSE), which measures the total squared Euclidian distance of instances to their representative values. The simplest and most commonly used algorithm, employing a squared error criterion is the K-means algorithm. K-means algorithm is the one of the simplest unsupervised learning algorithm that solves the clustering problem. The algorithm follows an easy way to classify a given data set into a certain number of clusters. The algorithm consists of two separate steps. The first step is to select k initial centroid randomly, one for each cluster. The next step is to take each point from a given data set and assign it to the nearest centroid. When all points are assigned to some clusters, the first step is completed and an early grouping is done. At this point we need to find the new centroids by calculating the mean values of clusters. A loop has been generated. As a result of this loop, k centroids change their location step by step until no more changes are done. This signifies the convergence criterion for clustering. Finally, this algorithm aims at minimizing an objective function, in this case a squared error function. The objective function, where is a chosen distance measure between a data point and the cluster centre , is an indicator of the distance of the n data points from their respective cluster centres. K-means algorithm is given below (Algorithm 1).[5] Algorithm 1. K-means Clustering Algorithm Input: D = {d1, d2, d3,…,dn} //set of n data items K // number of desired clusters Output: A set of k clusters Steps: 1. Choose k data items from D randomly as initial centroids; 2. Repeat Assign each item di to the cluster which has closest centroid; Calculate new mean for each cluster; Until convergence criteria is met. 4.2 Hierarchical Clustering Hierarchical clustering aims to obtain a hierarchy of clusters, called dendrogram, that shows how the clusters are related to each other. These methods proceed either by iteratively merging small clusters into larger ones (agglomerative algorithms) or by splitting large clusters (divisive algorithms). A partition of the data items can be obtained by cutting the dendrogram at a desired level. Er. Daljit Kaur, IJRIT

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 2, Issue 8, August 2014, Pg. 200-204

An agglomerative clustering starts with one-point clusters and recursively merges two or more most appropriate clusters. A divisive clustering starts with one cluster of all data points and recursively splits the most appropriate cluster. The process continues until a stopping criterion. Hierarchical clustering methods could be further divided according to the manner that the similarity measure is calculated [3]: Single-link clustering: Methods that consider the distance between two clusters to be equal to the shortest distance from any member of one cluster to any member of the other cluster. If the data consist of similarities, the similarity between a pair of clusters is considered to be equal to the greatest similarity from any member of one cluster to any member of the other cluster. Complete-link clustering: Methods that consider the distance between two clusters to be equal to the longest distance from any member of one cluster to any member of the other cluster[4] Average-link clustering: Methods that consider the distance between two clusters to be equal to the average distance from any member of one cluster to any member of the other cluster. Such clustering algorithms may be found in [8] and [12]. The disadvantages of the single-link clustering and the average-link clustering can be summarized as follows : Single-link clustering has a drawback known as the “chaining effect“: A few points that form a bridge between two clusters cause the single-link clustering to unify these two clusters into one. Average link clustering may cause elongated clusters to split and for portions of neighboring elongated clusters to merge. The complete-link clustering methods usually produce more compact clusters and more useful hierarchies than the single-link clustering methods, yet the single-link methods are more versatile[7]. 4.3 Density-Based Clustering A cluster, defined as a connected dense component, grows in any direction that density leads. Therefore, density-based algorithms are capable of discovering clusters of arbitrary shapes. Also this provides a natural protection against outliers. There are two major approaches for density-based methods. The first approach pins density to a training data point. Representative algorithms include DBSCAN, GDBSCAN, OPTICS, and DBCLASD. The second approach pins density to a point in the attribute space. It includes the algorithm DENCLUE. Density-connectivity is a symmetric relation and all the points reachable from core objects can be factorized into maximal connected components serving as clusters. The points that are not connected to any core point are declared to be outliers. Outliers are not covered by any cluster. The non-core points inside a cluster represent its boundary. Finally, core objects are internal points.

5. Conclusion Clustering is one of the most useful tasks in data mining process for discovering groups and identifying interesting distributions and patterns in the underlying data. Clustering problem is about partitioning a given data set into groups such that the data points in a cluster are more similar to each other than points in different clusters .This paper describes the process for clustering. Classification of data clustering is also given.

6. Acknowledgement I would like to express my very great appreciation to Mr. Sukhmandeep Singh for his valuable and constructive suggestions. I wish to thank my parents for their support and encouragement throughout my study.

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 2, Issue 8, August 2014, Pg. 200-204

7. References [1] A. K. Jain, “Data clustering: 50 years beyond K-means”, Pattern Recognition Letters 31, 2010, pp.651-666. [2] A. K. Jain, and R. C. Dubes, Algorithms for clustering data, Prentice-Hall, USA, 1988. [3] A. K. Jain, and M.N. Murty, and P.J. Flynn, “Data Clustering: A Review”, ACM Computing Surveys, Vol. 31, No. 3, 1999. [4] B. King, “Step-wise Clustering Procedures”, J. Am. Stat. Assoc. 69, pp. 86-101, 1967. [5] D. Kaur,and K. Jyoti, “Enhancement in the Performance of K-means Algorithm”, International Journal of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2013, pp. 29-32. [6] F. Murtagh, “A survey of recent advances in hierarchical clustering algorithms which use cluster centers”, Comput. J. 26, pp.354-359, 1984. [7] J. Kogan, and C. Nicholas, and M. Teboulle, Grouping Multidimensional Data, Springer, 2006. [8] J. H. Ward “Hierarchical grouping to optimize an objective function.”, Journal of the American Statistical Association, pp.236-244, 1963. [9] M. Halkidi, and Y. Batistakis, and M. Vazirgiannis, “On Clustering Validation Techniques”, Journal of Intelligent Information System, 2001, pp.107-145. [10] M. K. Pakhira, “Clustering Large Databases in Distributed Environment”, in IEEE International Advance Computing Conference, 2009. [11] N. Grira,and M. Crucianu, and N. Boujemaa, “Unsupervised and Semi-supervised Clustering: A Brief Survey”, pp.1-12. [12] O. Maimon, and L. Rokach, Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery Handbook, Springer, 2010. [13] P. Sneath, and R. Sokal, Numerical Taxonomy, W.H. Freeman Co., San Francisco, CA, 1973.

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Survey on Data Clustering - IJRIT

common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine ... The clustering process may result in different partitioning of a data set, ...

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