Some Polynomial Theorems

by

John Kennedy Mathematics Department Santa Monica College 1900 Pico Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90405 [email protected]

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This paper contains a collection of 31 theorems, lemmas, and corollaries that help explain some fundamental properties of polynomials. The statements of all these theorems can be understood by students at the precalculus level, even though a few of these theorems do not appear in any precalculus text. However, to understand the proofs requires a much more substantial and more mature mathematical background, including proof by mathematical induction and some simple calculus. Of significance are the Division Algorithm and theorems about the sum and product of the roots, two theorems about the bounds of roots, a theorem about conjugates of irrational roots, a theorem about integer roots, a theorem about the equality of two polynomials, theorems related to the Euclidean Algorithm for finding the KGH of two polynomials, and theorems about the Partial Fraction Decomposition of a rational function and Descartes's Rule of Signs. It is rare to find proofs of either of these last two major theorems in any precalculus text.

1. The Division Algorithm If :ÐBÑ and .ÐBÑ ´ / ! are any two polynomials then there exist unique polynomials ;ÐBÑ and <ÐBÑ such that :ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ  <ÐBÑ where the degree of <ÐBÑ is strictly less than the degree of .ÐBÑ when the degree of .ÐBÑ   " or else <ÐBÑ ´ !. Division Algorithm Proof: We apply induction on the degree 8 of :ÐBÑÞ We let 7 denote the degree of the divisor .ÐBÑÞ We will establish uniqueness after we establish the existence of ;ÐBÑ and <ÐBÑÞ If 8 œ ! then :ÐBÑ œ - where - is a constantÞ Case ": 7 œ !Þ .ÐBÑ œ 5 where 5 is a constant and since .ÐBÑ ´ Î ! we know 5 Á 0. In this case choose ;ÐBÑ œ and choose <ÐBÑ ´ !Þ 5 Then .ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ  <ÐBÑ œ 5 †  ! œ - œ :ÐBÑÞ In this case <ÐBÑ ´ !Þ 5 Case #: 7  !Þ In this case let ;ÐBÑ ´ ! and let <ÐBÑ œ -Þ Then clearly .ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ  <ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † !  - œ !  - œ - œ :ÐBÑÞ In this case the degree of <ÐBÑ is strictly less than the degree of .ÐBÑÞ Now assume there exist polynomials ;" ÐBÑ and <" ÐBÑ such that :" ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ whenever :" ÐBÑ is any polynomial that has a degree less than or equal to 5 . Let :ÐBÑ be a polynomial of degree 5  "Þ We assume :ÐBÑ œ +5+" B5"  +5 B5  â  +" B  +! where +5" Á !Þ We must show the theorem statement holds for :ÐBÑÞ Case ": 7 œ !Þ .ÐBÑ œ - where - is a constant and since .ÐBÑ ´ / ! we know - Á !Þ " Let ;ÐBÑ œ :ÐBÑ and let <ÐBÑ ´ !Þ 1 Then .ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ  <ÐBÑ œ - † :ÐBÑ  ! œ :ÐBÑ  ! œ :ÐBÑÞ In this case <ÐBÑ ´ !Þ proof continued on the next page

page 1

Case #: 7  !Þ +5" Let .ÐBÑ œ .7 B7  â  ." B  .! where .7 Á !Þ Note that Á ! since both .7 +5" 5"7 constants are nonzero. Let :" ÐBÑ œ :ÐBÑ  B † .ÐBÑÞ Then the subtraction on .7 the right cancels the leading term of :ÐBÑ so :" ÐBÑ is a polynomial of degree 5 or less and we can apply the induction assumption to :" ÐBÑ to conclude there exist polynomials ;" ÐBÑ and <" ÐBÑ such that :" ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ where the degree of <" ÐBÑ is strictly less than that of .ÐBÑÞ +5" 5"7 B † .ÐBÑ .7 Now we solve the 2nd equation for :ÐBÑÞ

:" ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ œ :ÐBÑ 

:ÐBÑ œ

+5" 5"7 B † .ÐBÑ  .ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ .7

:ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † 

+5" 5"7 B  ;" ÐBÑ   <" ÐBÑÞ .7

So we may let ;ÐBÑ œ 

+5" 5"7 B  ;" ÐBÑ  and let <ÐBÑ œ <" ÐBÑ and .7 we have established the theorem holds for :ÐBÑ of degree 5  "Þ The induction proof that establishes the existence part of the theorem is now complete. To establish uniqueness, suppose :ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ œ .ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ  <# ÐBÑÞ Then we have .ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  ;# ÐBÑ œ <# ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑÞ Call this equation (*). Case 1: 7 œ !Þ In this case both remainders must be identically zero and this means <" ÐBÑ ´ <# ÐBÑÞ In turn, this means .ÐBÑ † Ò ;" ÐBÑ  ;# ÐBÑ Ó ´ !, and since .ÐBÑ ´ Î ! we must have ;" ÐBÑ  ;# ÐBÑ ´ ! which of course implies ;" ÐBÑ ´ ;# ÐBÑÞ Case #: 7  !Þ If  ;" ÐBÑ  ;# ÐBÑ ´ Î ! then we can compute the degrees of the polynomials on both sides of the (*) equation. The degree on the left side is greater than or equal to the degree of .ÐBÑÞ But on the right side, both remainders have degrees less than .ÐBÑ so their difference has a degree that is less than or equal to that of either which is less than the degree of .ÐBÑÞ This is a contradiction. So we must have  ;" ÐBÑ  ;# ÐBÑ ´ ! and when this is the case the entire left side of the (*) equation is identically ! and we may add back <" ÐBÑ from the right side to conclude that the two remainders are also identically equal. Q.E.D.

page 2

2. The Division Check for a Linear Divisor Consider dividing the polynomial :ÐBÑ by the linear term ÐB  +ÑÞ Then, the Division Check states that: :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  +Ñ † ;ÐBÑ  < Division Check Proof: This is just a special case of the Division Algorithm where the divisor is linear. Q.E.D.

3. Remainder Theorem When any polynomial :ÐBÑ is divided by ÐB  +Ñ the remainder is :Ð+ÑÞ Remainder Theorem Proof: By the Division Check we have :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  +Ñ † ;ÐBÑ  <Þ Now let B œ +Þ This last equation says :Ð+Ñ œ Ð+  +Ñ † ;Ð+Ñ  < :Ð+Ñ œ ! † ;Ð+Ñ  < œ !  < œ <Þ Q.E.D.

4. Factor Theorem ÐB  +Ñ is a factor of the polynomial :ÐBÑ if and only if :Ð+Ñ œ !Þ Factor Theorem Proof: Assume ÐB  +Ñ is a factor of :ÐBÑ. Then we know ÐB  +Ñ divides evenly into :ÐBÑÞ The remainder when :ÐBÑ is divided by ÐB  +Ñ must be 0. By the Remainder Theorem this says ! œ < œ :Ð+ÑÞ Next, assume :Ð+Ñ œ !Þ Divide :ÐBÑ by ÐB  +ÑÞ By the Remainder Theorem, the remainder is :Ð+Ñ œ !Þ Since the remainder is 0, the division comes out even so that ÐB  +Ñ is a factor of :ÐBÑÞ Q.E.D.

5. Maximum Number of Zeros Theorem A polynomial cannot have more real zeros than its degree. Maximum Number of Zeros Theorem Proof: By contradiction. Suppose :ÐBÑ has degree 8   1, and suppose +" ß +# ß á ß +8 ß +8" are 8+1 roots of :ÐBÑÞ By the Factor Theorem, since :Ð+1 Ñ œ ! then there exists a polynomial ;" ÐBÑ of degree one less than :ÐBÑ such that :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  +1 Ñ † ;" ÐBÑÞ Now since :+#  œ ! and since +# Á +" ß we must have ;" Ð+# Ñ œ ! and again by the Factor Theorem we can write :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  +" Ñ † ÐB  +# Ñ † ;# ÐBÑ where ;# ÐBÑ is of degree # less than :ÐBÑÞ Now since +$ is distinct from +" and +# we must have ;# Ð+$ Ñ œ ! and we can continue to factor :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  +" Ñ † ÐB  +# Ñ † ÐB  +$ Ñ † ;$ ÐBÑ where the degree of ;$ ÐBÑ is of degree $ less than :ÐBÑÞ Clearly this argument can be repeated until we reach the stage where :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  +" ÑâÐB  +8 Ñ † ;8 ÐBÑ and ;8 ÐBÑ is of degree 8 less than :ÐBÑÞ Since :ÐBÑ only had degree 8 in the first place, ;8 ÐBÑ must be of degree 0 making ;8 ÐBÑ some constant, say ;8 ÐBÑ œ -Þ Now +8" is still a zero of :ÐBÑß and since +8" is distinct from all the other +3 ß we must have ;8 Ð+8" Ñ œ !Þ The only way this can happen is if - œ ! and this would imply :ÐBÑ ´ !ß a contradiction since we are assuming 8   "Þ Q.E.D.

page 3

6. Fundamental Theorem of Algebra a) Every polynomial of degree 8   " has at least one zero among the complex numbers. b) If :ÐBÑ denotes a polynomial of degree 8ß then :ÐBÑ has exactly 8 roots, some of which may be either irrational numbers or complex numbers. Fundamental Theorem of Algebra Proof: This is not proved here. Gauss proved this in 1799 as his Ph.D. doctoral dissertation topic.

7. Product and Sum of the Roots Theorem Let :ÐBÑ œ 1B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! be any polynomial with real coefficients with a leading coefficient of 1 where 8   ". Then +! is Ð"Ñ8 times the product of all the roots of :ÐBÑ œ ! and +8" is the opposite of the sum of all the roots of :ÐBÑ œ !. Product and Sum of the Roots Theorem Proof: By the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra we know :ÐBÑ has 8 roots which may be denoted by <" ß <# ß <$ ß á ß <8 Þ Now form the product of the 8 factors associated with these roots. Let ;ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <8 Ñ and multiply out all these terms. Then inspect the coefficient on B8" and inspect the constant term. This can also be formally proved by using induction on 8. When 8 œ " we have :ÐBÑ œ B  +! and in this case the only root of :ÐBÑ is <" œ +! Þ Since <" is the only root, <" is itself the product of all the roots. But then Ð"Ñ8 +! œ Ð"Ñ" +! œ +! œ <" Þ So this establishes the part about the constant term. Note again that since <" is the only root, <" is itself the sum of all the roots and the 2nd leading coefficient is the opposite of the sum of all the roots since +! œ Ð <" ÑÞ It is probably more instructive to manually look at the case when 8 œ # before setting up the induction step. Note that ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# Ñ œ B#  Ð<"  <# ÑB  <" <# Þ In this case it is immediately apparent that the 2nd leading coefficient is the opposite of the sum of all the roots and the constant term is product of all the roots. Because :ÐBÑ is quadratic, in this case 8 œ # so (1)8 œ (1)# œ "Þ Now lets assume the result is true whenever we have 5 roots and let :ÐBÑ be a polynomial with 5  " roots, say :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑâÐB  <5" ÑÞ Now consider that we may write :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑâÐB  <5 ÑÐB  <5" Ñ. Let ;ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑâÐB  <5 ÑÞ Then ;ÐBÑ has degree 5 and we may apply the induction hypothesis to ;ÐBÑ. If we write ;ÐBÑ œ B5  +5" B5"  â  +" B  +! then we know +5" œ   <3  and we know 5

3œ"

+! œ Ð"Ñ5 †   <3 . 5

3œ"

Now :ÐBÑ œ ;ÐBÑ † ÐB  <5" Ñ œ ÐB  <5" Ñ † B5  +5" B5"  â  +" B  +!  proof continued on the next page

page 4

œ B5"  +5" B5  â  +" B#  +! B  Ð<5" ÑB5  Ð<5" Ñ+5" B5"  â  Ð<5" Ñ+" B  Ð<5" Ñ+!  œ B5"  Ö+5"  Ð<5" Ñ×B5  â  Ð+!  <5" † +" ÑB  Ð<5" Ñ † +! . Clearly +5"  Ð<5" Ñ œ   <5   Ð<5" Ñ œ   <3  and Ð<5" Ñ † +! œ 5

5"

3œ"

3œ"

Ð<5" Ñ † Ð"Ñ5 †   <3  œ Ð"Ñ5" †   <3  which are what we needed to establish. 5

5"

3œ"

3œ"

Q.E.D.

8. Rational Roots Theorem Let :ÐBÑ œ +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! be any polynomial with integer coefficients. If the rational number is a reduced rational root of :ÐBÑ œ ! then - must . be a factor of +! and . must be a factor of +8 Þ Rational Roots Theorem Proof. +8" 8" +8# 8# +$ +# +" +! Let ;ÐBÑ œ B8  B  B  â  B$  B#  B  Þ +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 By the Product of the Roots Theorem, we know the product of the roots of this +! polynomial is the fraction Ð"Ñ8 † Þ Thus if is a root, - must be a factor of +! and . must +8 . be a factor of +8 Þ Q.E.D.

9. Integer Roots Theorem Let :ÐBÑ œ B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! be any polynomial with integer coefficients and with a leading coefficient of 1. If :ÐBÑ has any rational zeros, then those zeros must all be integers. Integer Roots Theorem Proof: By the Rational Roots Theorem we know the denominator of any rational zero must divide into the leading coefficient which in this case is 1. Thus any denominator must be „ 1 making the rational zero into a pure integer. Q.E.D.

page 5

10. Upper and Lower Bounds Theorem Let :ÐBÑ be any polynomial with real coefficients and a positive leading coefficient. (Upper Bound) If +  ! and :Ð+Ñ  ! and if in applying synthetic substitution to compute :Ð+Ñ all numbers in the 3rd row are positive, then + is an upper bound for all the roots of :ÐBÑ œ !. (Lower Bound) If +  ! and :Ð+Ñ Á ! and if in applying synthetic substitution to compute :Ð+Ñ all the numbers in the 3rd row alternate in sign then + is a lower bound for all the roots of :ÐBÑ œ !. [ In either bound case, we can allow any number of zeros in any positions in the 3rd row except in the first and last positions. The first number is assumed to be positive and the last number is :Ð+Ñ Á !. For upper bounds, we can state alternatively and more precisely that no negatives are allowed in the 3rd row. In the lower bound case the alternating sign requirement is not strict either, as any 0 value can assume either sign as required. In practice you may rarely see any zeros in the 3rd row. However, a slightly stronger and more precise statement is that the bounds still hold even when zeros are present anywhere as interior entries in the 3rd row.] Upper and Lower Bounds Theorem Proof: (Upper Bound). Let , be any root of the equation :ÐBÑ œ !Þ Must show ,  +Þ If , œ !, then clearly ,  + since + is positive in this case. So we assume , Á !. If the constant term of :ÐBÑ is !, then we could factor B or a pure power of B from :ÐBÑ and just operate on the resulting polynomial that is then guaranteed to have a nonzero constant term. So we can implicitly assume :Ð!Ñ Á !Þ The last number in the third row of the synthetic substitution process is positive and it is :Ð+ÑÞ Since , is a root, we know by the Factor Theorem that :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  ,Ñ † ;ÐBÑ where ;ÐBÑ is the quotient polynomial. The leading coefficient of :ÐBÑ is also the leading coefficient of ;ÐBÑ and since all of ;ÐBÑ's remaining coefficients are positive, and since +  !, we must have ;Ð+Ñ  !Þ Finally, :Ð+Ñ œ Ð+  ,Ñ † ;Ð+ÑÞ Since ;Ð+Ñ  !, we may :Ð+Ñ divide by ;Ð+Ñ and get Ð+  ,Ñ œ Þ Now since :Ð+Ñ and ;Ð+Ñ are both positive, Ð+  ,Ñ  ! ;Ð+Ñ which implies ,  +Þ Note that since the leading coefficient of ;ÐBÑ is positive and since +  !, we don't really need all positive numbers in the last row. As long as ;ÐBÑ's remaining coefficients are nonnegative we can guarantee that ;Ð+Ñ  !Þ (Lower Bound). Let , be any root of the equation :ÐBÑ œ !Þ Must show +  ,Þ As in the above Upper Bound proof, we can easily dispense with the case when , œ !Þ Clearly +  , when , œ ! because + is negative. We can further implicitly assume no pure power of B is a factor of :ÐBÑ and this also allows us to assume :Ð!Ñ Á !Þ Since :Ð,Ñ œ ! by the Factor Theorem we may write :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  ,Ñ † ;ÐBÑ. Substituting B œ + we have :Ð+Ñ œ Ð+  ,Ñ † ;Ð+ÑÞ Since :Ð+Ñ :Ð+Ñ Á ! we know ;Ð+Ñ Á !Þ So we can divide by ;Ð+Ñ to get Ð+  ,Ñ œ Þ ;Ð+Ñ Now ;Ð+Ñ is either positive or negative. Because +  ! and the leading term in ;ÐBÑ has a positive coefficient, the constant term in ;ÐBÑ has the same sign as ;Ð+Ñ. This fact can be established by considering the two cases of the even or odd degrees that ;ÐBÑ must have.

proof continued on the next page

page 6

For examples: ;ÐBÑ œ "B&  #B%  $B$  %B#  &B  'Þ With +  !ß ;Ð+Ñ  ! and ;Ð+Ñ and ;ÐBÑw s constant term agree in sign. or ;ÐBÑ œ "B%  #B$  $B#  %B  &. With +  !, ;Ð+Ñ  ! and again ;Ð+Ñ and ;ÐBÑw s constant term agree in sign. We might note that in these examples, it would make no difference if any of the interior coefficients were 0. This is because the first term has a positive coefficient, and all the remaining terms just add fuel to the fire with the same sign as the first term. The presence of an interior zero just means you might not get as big a fire, but the first term guarantees there is a flame! Another note is that :Ð!Ñ œ Ð,Ñ † ;Ð!Ñß and since we are assuming , Á !ß we can divide this equation by , to conclude that ;Ð!Ñ Á ! when :Ð!Ñ Á !Þ So assuming neither , nor the constant term in :ÐBÑ are zero guarantees that the constant term in ;ÐBÑ must be strictly positive or strictly negative. Since the numbers in the third row alternate in sign, :Ð+Ñ differs in sign from the constant term in ;ÐBÑÞ But since the constant term in ;ÐBÑ has the same sign as ;Ð+Ñ we know :Ð+Ñ and ;Ð+Ñ :Ð+Ñ differ in sign. So Ð+  ,Ñ œ  !Þ +  ,Þ ;Ð+Ñ Q.E.D.

11. Intermediate Value Theorem If :ÐBÑ is any polynomial with real coefficients, and if :Ð+Ñ  ! and :Ð,Ñ  ! then there is at least one real number - between + and , such that :Ð-Ñ œ !Þ Intermediate Value Theorem Proof: This result depends on the continuity of all polynomials and is a special case of the Intermediate Value Theorem that normally appears in a calculus class.

12. Single Bound Theorem Let :ÐBÑ œ B8  +8" B8"  +8# B8#  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! be any polynomial with real coefficients and a leading coefficient of 1. Let Q" œ "  7+BÖ+! ß +" ß +# ß á ß +8" × and let Q# œ 7+BÖ"ß +!   +"   +#   á  +8" ×. Finally let Q œ 738ÖQ" ß Q# ×. Then every zero of :ÐBÑ lies between Q and Q . Single Bound Theorem Proof: We need to show Q is an Upper Bound and we need to show Q is a Lower Bound. Case 1: Q œ Q" Þ

Then we know for ! Ÿ 3 Ÿ 8  " that Q   "  +3 Þ This implies two things. First, Q   " and second, Q  +3    "Þ These two inequalities are crucial and further imply that Q Ÿ " and Q  +3  Ÿ "Þ proof continued on the next page

page 7

To show Q is an Upper Bound, consider the synthetic substitution calculation of :ÐQ ÑÞ We will label the second and remaining coefficients in the second row as ,3 values. We will label the second and remaining coefficients in the third row as -3 values. Q " "

+8" Q -8"

+8# ,8# -8#

+8$ ,8$ -8$

â â â

+" ," -"

+! ,! -!

We claim that each -3 value is not only positive, we claim each -3   "Þ Similarly we claim each ,3   Q Þ We will establish these two claims by working from left to right across the columns in the synthetic substitution table, one column at a time. First note that -8" œ +8"  Q   +8"   Q œ Q  +8"    "Þ We are done with the 2nd column. Now we will argue about the 3rd column in the above table. Having established in the 2nd column that -8"   "ß multiply both sides of this inequality by Q to obtain: ,8# œ -8" † Q   Q Þ Now we basically repeat the above argument to establish the size of -8# œ +8#  ,8# Þ Here we use the fact that ,8#   Q   "  +8# . So ,8#  +8#    "Þ So -8# œ +8#  ,8#   +8#   ,8# œ ,8#  +8#    "Þ We are now done with the 3rd column in the table. Each next column is handled like the 3rd column. Just to make sure you get the idea we will establish our claims for the 4th column. Since -8#   ", we can multiply across this inequality by Q to get -8# † Q   Q Þ ,8$ œ -8# † Q   Q Þ -8$ œ +8$  ,8$   +8$   ,8$ œ ,8$  +8$    Q  +8$    "Þ Clearly we can continue working across the columns of the above table, one column at a time. Since all the -3 coefficients are positive we know Q is an Upper Bound for the zeros of :ÐBÑÞ Next, to show Q is a Lower Bound, consider the synthetic substitution calculation of :ÐQ ÑÞ Q " "

+8" Q -8"

+8# ,8# -8#

a8$ ,8$ -8$

â â â

+" ," -"

+! ,! -!

proof continued on the next page

page 8

We claim that the coefficients in the 3rd row alternate in sign. Obviously the first coefficient is "  !Þ We claim not only that the -3 alternate in sign, we claim that when -3  ! then -3 Ÿ "Þ We also claim that when -3  ! then -3   "Þ

In the 2nd column of the table we have -8" œ +8"  Q Ÿ +8"   Q œ Q  +8"  Ÿ "Þ So we have established our claim within the 2nd column. Moving over to the 3rd column we note that ,8# œ -8" † Q  and since both of the numbers in this product are negative, we have ,8#  !Þ In fact when we start with the inequality that -8" Ÿ " and multiply across by the negative number Q we get -8# † Q    Q Þ But ,8# œ -8# † Q  so we know that ,8#   Q Þ Now lets compute -8# Þ -8# œ +8#  ,8#   +8#  Q   +8#   Q œ Q  +8#    "Þ Next, consider what happens in the 4th column of the above table. We just established that -8#   "Þ Multiplying across this inequality by Q we get -8# † Q  Ÿ Q Þ But ,8$ œ -8# † Q  so we know ,8$ Ÿ Q Þ Now lets compute -8$ Þ -8$ œ +8$  ,8$ Ÿ +8$  Q Ÿ +8$   Q œ Q  +8$  Ÿ "Þ Clearly the above arguments may be repeated as we move across the columns of the above table. Each time we multiply by Q to compute the next ,3 value we have a sign change. This is primarily why the -3 values alternate in sign. In any case, the values in the 3rd row alternate in sign and since Q  ! we know Q is a lower bound for any zero of the equation :ÐBÑ œ !Þ Case 2: Q œ Q# Þ

Subcase 1: Q œ " and +!   +"   +#   â  +8"   "Þ

In particular, for each 3 where ! Ÿ 3 Ÿ 8  " we know ! Ÿ +3   " œ Q Þ Then +3   Q œ "  +3   !Þ Since Q œ ", the Synthetic Substitution table takes on a particularly simple form. Note how the 2nd row elements are the same as the 3rd row elements shifted over one column. " " +8" +8# a8$ +8% â +" +! " -8" -8# -8$ â -# -" " -8" -8# -8$ -8% â -" -! We claim that all the -3 values are positive. Starting in the 2nd column, -8" œ +8"  "   +8"   " œ "  +8"   !Þ proof continued on the next page

page 9

Now consider the 3rd column. -8# œ +8#  -8" œ +8#  +8"  "   +8#   +8"   " œ +8#   +8"   "  !Þ Next consider the 4th column. c8$ œ +8$  -8# œ +8$  +8#  +8"  "   +8$   +8#   +8"   " œ +8$   +8#   +8"   "  !Þ Clearly we can continue to accumulate the sums of more and more terms and still apply the main inequality that appears in the Subcase 1: statement. So all the elements in the last row are positive and " œ Q is an upper bound for all the roots of :ÐBÑ œ ! by applying the Upper/Lower Bounds Theorem. To establish that 1 is a lower bound we compute synthetic substitution with Q œ  "Þ " " "

+8" " -8"

+8# -8" -8#

a8$ -8# -8$

+8% -8$ -8%

â â â

+" -# -"

+! -" -!

Now we must establish that the -3 values in the last row alternate in sign. Starting in the 2nd column, -8" œ +8"  Ð"Ñ Ÿ +8"   "  !Þ In the 3rd column, -8# œ +8#    -8"  œ +8#  +8"  "   +8#   +8"   " œ +8#   +8"   "  !Þ

In the 4th column, -8$ œ +8$  -8#  œ +8$  +8#  +8"  " Ÿ +8$   +8#   +8"   "  !Þ Clearly this argument may be repeated to establish that the coefficients in the 3rd row really do alternate in sign. So Q œ " is a lower bound by the Upper/Lower Bounds Theorem. Subcase #: Q œ +!   +"   +#   â  +8"  and Q   "Þ To establish that Q is an upper bound, we consider the synthetic substitution table for computing :ÐQ Ñ and we will show that all the values in the last row are nonnegative. Q " "

+8" Q -8"

+8# ,8# -8#

+8$ ,8$ -8$

â â â

+" ," -"

+! ,! -!

proof continued on the next page

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Now consider the 2nd column in the above table. -8" œ +8"  Q   +8"   Q œ +!   +"   +#   â  +8#    !Þ Next consider the 3rd column in the above table. Since Q   "ß -8" † Q   -8" Þ But ,8# œ -8" † Q so ,8#   -8" Þ Next, -8# œ +8#  ,8#   +8#  -8" œ +8#  +8"  Q   +8#   +8"   Q œ +!   +"   +#   â  +8$    !Þ We continue to argue in the same manner for the 4th column. Since Q   "ß -82 † Q   -82 Þ But ,83 œ -82 † Q so ,83   -82 Þ Next, -83 œ +8$  ,8$   +8$  -8#   +8$  +8#  +8"  Q   +8$   +8#   +8"   Q œ +!   +"   +#   â  +8%    !Þ This argument may be repeated across the columns in the above table to establish that all the numbers in the last row are nonnegative. So by the Upper/Lower Bounds Theorem, Q is an upper bound for all the roots of :ÐBÑ œ !Þ Finally, consider the synthetic substitution table for computing :ÐQ ÑÞ Q " "

+8" Q -8"

+8# ,8# -8#

+8$ ,8$ -8$

+8% ,8% -8%

â â â

+" ," -"

+! ,! -!

We claim the nonnegative numbers in the 3rd row of this table alternate in sign. In the first column the number is 1 so we know we are starting with a positive value. Now look at -8" in the 2nd columnÞ -8" œ +8"  Q  œ +8"  +!   +"   +#   â  +8"  œ +8"  +8"   +!   +"   +#   â  +8#  Þ Now the last term in the above expression is obviously less than or equal to zero, and the first two terms either make ! or make # † +8"  so the whole expression is less than or equal to 0. Now consider the 3rd column. We must show -8#   !. We take the worst case from -8" assuming this has the smallest absolute value where -8" œ +!   +"   +#   â  +8#  Þ Then -8# œ +8#  +!   +"   +#   â  +8#   † Q  œ +8#  Q † +8#   +!   +"   +#   â  +8$   † Q    +8#  +8#   +!   +"   +#   â  +8$   † Q    ! since the third term is nonnegative and the first two terms make either 0 or # † +8# Þ proof continued on the next page

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Now consider the 4th column. We must show -8$ Ÿ !Þ We take the worst case from -8# assuming -8# has the smallest absolute value where -8# œ +!   +"   +#   â  +8$   † Q Þ Then -8$ œ +8$  +!   +"   +#   â  +8$   † Q #  œ +8$  Q # † +8$   +!   +"   +#   â  +8%   † Q #  Ÿ +8$  +8$   +!   +"   +#   â  +8%   † Q #  Ÿ ! since the third term is negative and the first two terms make either ! or # † +8$ Þ Just to make sure you get the idea we will continue with the 5th column. We must show -8%   !Þ We take the worst case from -8$ assuming -8$ has the smallest absolute value where -8$ œ +!   +"   +#   â  +8%   † Q # Þ Then -8% œ +8%  +!   +"   +#   â  +8%   † Q $  œ +8%  Q $ † +8%   +!   +"   +#   â  +8&   † Q $    +8%  +8%   +!   +"   +#   â  +8&   † Q $    ! since the third term is nonnegative and the first two terms make either 0 or # † +8% Þ This argument may be repeated across the columns of the above table to conclude that the nonnegative terms in the last row alternate in sign. By the Upper/Lower Bounds Theorem we know Q is a lower bound for all the zeros of :ÐBÑ œ !Þ Q.E.D.

13. Odd Degree Real Root Theorem If :ÐBÑ has real coefficients and has a degree that is odd then it has at least one real root. Odd Degree Real Root Theorem Proof: Without loss of generality we assume the leading coefficient of :ÐBÑ is positive. Otherwise we can factor " from :ÐBÑ apply the theorem to the polynomial that is the other factor. By choosing Q  ! sufficiently large we can establish that :ÐQ Ñ  ! and :ÐQ Ñ  !Þ For example, see the above Single Bound Theorem. Now apply the Intermediate Value Theorem. There exists a number + such that Q  +  Q and :Ð+Ñ œ !Þ + is real and is a root of :ÐBÑÞ Q.E.D.

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14. Complex Conjugate Roots Theorem If :ÐBÑ is any polynomial with real coefficients, and if +  ,3 is a complex root of the equation :ÐBÑ œ !, then another complex root is its conjugate +  ,3Þ (Complex number roots appear in conjugate pairs) Complex Conjugate Roots Theorem. This proof just depends on properties of the conjugate operator denoted by bars below. If :ÐBÑ œ +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! œ ! then +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! œ !. +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! œ !. +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B  +" B  +! œ !. +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B  +" B  +! œ !. This shows :ÐBÑ œ !Þ Q.E.D.

15. Linear and Irreducible Quadratic Factors Theorem Any polynomial :ÐBÑ with real coefficients may be written as a product of linear factors and irreducible quadratic factors. The sum of all the degrees of these component factors is the degree of :ÐBÑÞ Linear and Irreducible Quadratic Factors Theorem Proof: By the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, :ÐBÑ œ -ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <8 Ñ where the <5 denote the 8 roots of :ÐBÑÞ The constant - is simply :ÐBÑ's leading coefficient. If all the <5 roots are real then :ÐBÑ is a product of linear real factors only. However, if any <5 value is a complex number then it can be paired with some other <4 value which is its complex conjugate. If we assume <5 œ +  ,3 then <4 œ +  ,3Þ Note that since <5 is complex, we must have , Á !Þ Next we note that <5  <4 œ #+ and <5 † <4 œ +#  ,# and we compute (B  <5 ÑÐB  <4 Ñ œ B#  Ð<5  <4 ÑB  <5 <4 œ B#  Ð#+ÑB  Ð+#  ,# ÑÞ That this last expression is an irreducible quadratic factor follows by computing its discriminant that is Ð#+Ñ#  % † " † Ð+#  ,# Ñ œ %+#  %+#  %,# œ %,#  ! since , Á !Þ If we re-order or rename the indices of the roots so that <5 and <4 were the last two roots then we can assume that :ÐBÑ now takes the form in which we put the irreducible quadratic just found at the end. :ÐBÑ œ -ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑâÐB  <8$ ÑÐB#  #+B  +#  ,# ÑÞ Now if any two of the preceding linear factors form complex <-value conjugate roots, we treat them just like we did with the pair <5 and <4 . This produces another irreducible quadratic factor which we also place as the last rightmost factor. Clearly this process can be continued until only real linear factors remain at the beginning and only irreducible quadratic factors are at the end. There may be no linear factors at the beginning and only irreducible quadratic factors, or there may be no irreducible quadratic factors at the end and only linear factors at the beginning. It all depends on the nature of the roots <3 and how many of these roots are real and how many are complex. Q.E.D.

page 13

Let :ÐBÑ be any polynomial with rational real coefficients. If +  ,- is a root of the equation :ÐBÑ œ ! where - is irrational and + and , Á 0 and - are all real and rational, then another root is +  ,- Þ (Like complex roots, irrational real roots in the special format +  ,appear in conjugate pairs, but only when the polynomial has rational coefficients.) Irrational Conjugate Roots Theorem Proof: Assume +  ,- is one root. Must show +  ,- is also a root. We assume , Á !Þ Let >ÐBÑ œ B  +  ,-  † B  +  ,-  œ B  +#  ,# -Þ Then >ÐBÑ is a quadratic polynomial with rational coefficients. Next, consider dividing :ÐBÑ by >ÐBÑÞ By the Division Algorithm, there is a quotient polynomial ;ÐBÑ and there exists a remainder polynomial <ÐBÑ such that :ÐBÑ œ >ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ  <ÐBÑ where the degree of <ÐBÑ is 1 or 0. If we assume <ÐBÑ œ GB  H then G and H must be rational. In fact, since :ÐBÑ and >ÐBÑ have only rational coefficients, both ;ÐBÑ and <ÐBÑ must have only rational coefficients. So we may write :ÐBÑ œ >ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ  GB  H and when we substitute B œ +  ,- we conclude that ! œ G +  ,-   H from which we can further conclude that G œ H œ !Þ So we really have :ÐBÑ œ >ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑÞ Finally we substitute B œ +  ,- in this last equation to conclude that :+  ,-  œ ! which is what we needed to show. Q.E.D.

16. Irrational Conjugate Roots Theorem

17. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 1. If :ÐBÑ has real coefficients, and if :Ð+Ñ œ ! where +  !ß then :ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation than the quotient polynomial ;ÐBÑ has sign variations where :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  +Ñ;ÐBÑÞ [When the difference in the number of sign variations is greater than 1, the difference is always an odd number.] Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 1 Proof: The following particular example shows that ;ÐBÑ may indeed have fewer sign variations than :ÐBÑ has. In this example, :ÐBÑ has three variations in sign while ;ÐBÑ has only two variations in sign. Had the number 152 in the top row been 102 instead, then ;ÐBÑ would have had even fewer sign variations as is shown in the next example. # "# (( "&# (( $! #% "!' *# $! "# &$ %' "& ! In the next example, :ÐBÑ has four sign variations while ;ÐBÑ has only one sign variation. So the difference of the sign variation counts in the example below is the odd number $. # "# (( "!# (( "(! #% "!' ) "(! "# &$ % )& ! proof continued on the next page

page 14

Finally we show one more example before starting the formal proof. In this example, :ÐBÑ has four sign variations and ;ÐBÑ has only three sign variations. Moreover, the coefficients in :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ match signs column by column from left to right through the constant column in ;ÐBÑÞ $ " ' "" "" "& $ * ' "& " $ # & ! Assume the leading coefficient of :ÐBÑ is positive and consider the synthetic substitution form used to compute :Ð+ÑÞ Consider the constant term in :ÐBÑÞ If this constant term is negative as in the first example above, then in the previous column the constant term in ;ÐBÑ must have been positive in order for the final column numbers to add to make 0. If the constant term in :ÐBÑ were positive as in the second example above, then in the previous column the constant term in ;ÐBÑ must have been negative in order for the final column numbers to add to make 0. So the constant terms in :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ must have opposite signs. This argument has depended on the facts that +  ! and that :Ð+Ñ œ !Þ But ;ÐBÑ and :ÐBÑ both start with the same positive coefficient. Next, reading from left to right, we claim ;ÐBÑ cannot change signs until :ÐBÑ changes signs. Whenever ;ÐBÑ changes signs from one column to the next, :ÐBÑ must also change signs between those same two columns. But as in the second example above (columns 2 & 3 and columns 3 & 4), ;ÐBÑ can keep the same sign even when :ÐBÑ does change sign. But ;ÐBÑ can never change signs unless :ÐBÑ changes signs first. Now suppose in counting sign changes that at some point :ÐBÑ changes signs when ;ÐBÑ does not as in the first two examples above. Then :ÐBÑ has one more sign variation, and from that point forward, :ÐBÑ will continue to lead in the sign variation count because each further time ;ÐBÑ changes signs, so does :ÐBÑÞ We can rest our case in this case. The other case that needs to be considered is when counting sign changes, if we reach the end of ;ÐBÑ, and if at that point :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ have the same sign variation count, as in the third example above. Then :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ will have the same sign in the next to the last column, but then :ÐBÑ will change signs one more time in its last column. No matter how you look at it, :ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation count than ;ÐBÑÞ If the leading coefficient of :ÐBÑ is not positive, then factor out 1 from :ÐBÑ and then apply the above argument to the resulting polynomial. We have already proved :ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation than the quotient polynomial ;ÐBÑ. To prove that the difference is always an odd number, we reiterate that the constant terms in both polynomials always differ in sign while the first terms always agree in sign. So when more than one sign variation occurs, it occurs at some interior coefficient. But changing the sign of any interior coefficient either raises or lowers the sign variation count by 2 because such a change applies to the term before it and to the term after it. So when the difference in the number of sign variations is more than ", it must be an odd difference. Q.E.D.

page 15

18. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 2. If :ÐBÑ has real coefficients, the number of positive zeros of :ÐBÑ is not greater than the number of variations in sign of the coefficients of :ÐBÑÞ Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 2 Proof: Let <" ß <# ß <$ ß á ß <5 denote all the positive roots of the equation :ÐBÑ œ !Þ Then we may write :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑÞ Now consider the following regrouping of these factors: :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# ÑÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑÞ By Lemma 1 we know :ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation than the rightmost factor. Let ;" ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <# ÑÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑÞ Then :ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation than ;" ÐBÑ has. Moreover, since we may write ;" ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <# ÑÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑ we can again apply Lemma 1 to conclude that ;" ÐBÑ has one at least more sign variation than the polynomial ÖÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑ×. Let ;# ÐBÑ œ ÖÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑ×Þ Now :ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation than ;" ÐBÑ and ;" ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation than ;# ÐBÑß so :ÐBÑ has at least two more sign variations than ;# ÐBÑÞ Clearly we may continue to regroup the rightmost factors and reduce the number of factors. ;# ÐBÑ œ ÖÐB  <$ ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑ× œ ÐB  <$ Ñ † ÖÐB  <% ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑ×Þ So ;# ÐBÑ has one or more sign variations than ;$ ÐBÑ œ ÖÐB  <% ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † UÐBÑ×Þ We argue that for each factor we drop, :ÐBÑ has yet at least another sign variation more than the resulting rightmost factor. After dropping all 5 factors we conclude that :ÐBÑ has 5 or more sign variations than does UÐBÑ, since after dropping 5 factors, UÐBÑ is all that remains. Now assume UÐBÑ has 7 sign variations in its coefficients and assume :ÐBÑ has 8 sign variations in its coefficients. Then because 7   !, 7  5 Ÿ 8 implies 5 Ÿ 8. The number of positive zeros of :ÐBÑ is less than or equal to the number of sign variations in the coefficients of :ÐBÑÞ Q.E.D.

page 16

19. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 3.

Let <" ß <# ß <$ ß á ß <5 denote 5 positive numbers and let :ÐBÑ œ  ÐB  <3 ÑÞ 5

3œ"

Then the coefficients of :ÐBÑ are all alternating in sign and this polynomial has exactly 5 sign variations in its coefficients. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 3 Proof: Either use induction on 5 or else apply Lemma 2 to conclude that UÐBÑ œ " has 5 fewer variations in sign than :ÐBÑÞ But since " has no variations in sign we know :ÐBÑ must have 5 variations in sign which means all the coefficients alternate in sign. As a simple example: ÐB  <" ÑÐB  <# Ñ œ B#  Ð<"  <# ÑB  "# <" † <# Þ Using induction, if 5 œ ", then we note ÐB  <" Ñ has exactly " sign variation. Next, assume the theorem is true for any polynomial with 5 factors or less, and let :ÐBÑ œ  ÐB  <3 Ñ œ ÐB  <5" Ñ †   ÐB  <3 Ñ 5"

5

3œ"

3œ"

If we consider the second factor to be the quotient polynomial then we can apply the induction assumption to conclude this quotient has exactly 5 sign variations. Next we apply Lemma " to :ÐBÑ to conclude that :ÐBÑ has at least one more sign variation than the quotient. This means :ÐBÑ has exactly 5  " sign variations. Being a Ð5  "Ñ=> degree polynomial, :ÐBÑ cannot have more than 5  " sign variations because it has only 5  # coefficients. Q.E.D.

20. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 4. The number of variations in sign of a polynomial with real coefficients is even if the first and last coefficients have the same sign, and is odd if the first and last coefficients have opposite signs. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 4 Proof: Before giving the proof we look at one example. :ÐBÑ œ B%  'B$  ""B#  "#B  "&Þ In this case, the first and last coefficients have the same sign and we can see that :ÐBÑ has an even number of sign changes in its coefficients; it has 4 sign changes. The degree of :ÐBÑ is %, it has & coefficients, and thus it has an a priori possibility of having at most 4 sign variations. If we were to change the sign of either the first or the last coefficient, we would have one less sign change, or an odd number of sign changes. If we were to increase the degree of :ÐBÑ by adding just one term, then we would not add a sign change unless the sign of that new term differed from the existing leading term's sign. We prove this theorem by strong induction on the degree 8 of the polynomial :ÐBÑÞ When 8 œ ", we assume :ÐBÑ œ +B  ,. If + and , have the same sign then we have 0 or an even number of sign changes. If + and , have opposite signs then we have 1 or an odd number of sign changes. So the theorem is true when 8 œ "Þ proof continued on the next page

page 17

Next, assume the theorem is true whenever 8 Ÿ 5 , and let :ÐBÑ be a polynomial of degree 5  "Þ Must show the theorem is true for :ÐBÑÞ Consider the polynomial of degree 5 , obtained by dropping the leading term from :ÐBÑÞ Call this polynomial ;ÐBÑÞ The theorem is assumed true for ;ÐBÑ since its degree can be assumed to be either 5 , or even better, less than 5 . There are two cases. Case 1: ;ÐBÑ's leading and trailing terms have the same sign. Then we know by the induction assumption that ;ÐBÑ has an even number of sign changes. There are only two possibilities for the sign of the leading term that was dropped. If the dropped leading term has the same sign as the leading term in ;ÐBÑ, then there is no sign change when this term is added back. So :ÐBÑ would still have an even number of sign changes and the leading and trailing terms of :ÐBÑ would still agree in sign. If the dropped leading term has a different sign from the leading term in ;ÐBÑß then there is one additional sign change that gets added when this term is put back. So in this case :ÐBÑ would have an odd number of sign changes. But also in this case, the leading and trailing terms of :ÐBÑ would have opposite signs. Case 2: ;ÐBÑ's leading and trailing terms have opposite signs. Then we know by the induction assumption that ;ÐBÑ has an odd number of sign changes. There are only two possibilities for the sign of the leading term that was dropped. If the dropped leading term has the same sign as the leading term in ;ÐBÑ, then there is no sign change when this term is added back. So :ÐBÑ would still have an odd number of sign changes and the leading and trailing terms of :ÐBÑ would still have opposite signs. If the dropped leading term has a different sign from the leading term in ;ÐBÑß then there is one additional sign change that gets added when this term is put back. So in this case :ÐBÑ would have an even number of sign changes. But also in this case, the leading and trailing terms of :ÐBÑ would have the same signs. In either case, the theorem is true for :ÐBÑ with degree 5  "Þ This completes the proof by induction on 8. Q.E.D.

page 18

21. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 5. If the number of positive zeros of :ÐBÑ with real coefficients is less than the number of sign variations in :ÐBÑ, it is less by an even number. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 5 Proof: If the leading coefficient of :ÐBÑ isn't ", we can factor it out and just assume :ÐBÑ œ ÐB  <" ÑâÐB  <5 Ñ † ÐB  8" ÑâÐB  84 Ñ † ÐB#  ," B  -" ÑâÐB#  ,6 B  -6 Ñ where the <3 denote all the positive zeros of :ÐBÑ, the 83 denote the all the negative zeros of :ÐBÑ, and the remaining factors are quadratics corresponding to all the complex-conjugate paired complex zeros of :ÐBÑ. Let = be the number of sign changes in the coefficients of :ÐBÑÞ We assume 5  = and we must show there exists an even integer / such that /  ! and 5  / œ =Þ Let 0 ÐBÑ œ ÐB  8" ÑâÐB  84 Ñ † ÐB#  ," B  -" ÑâÐB#  ,6 B  -6 ÑÞ By Lemma 2, we know the 0 ÐBÑ polynomial has at least 5 fewer sign variations than :ÐBÑÞ We let > be the number of sign changes in the 0 ÐBÑ polynomial. Then we know >   =  5  !Þ Next we note a special property of each of the irreducible quadratic factors. The discriminant of each quadratic must be negative, so we know ,3#  % † " † - 3  !Þ So ! Ÿ ,3#  %-3 and we conclude that all the -3 coefficients are strictly positive. Also, each ÐB  83 Ñ factor of 0 ÐBÑ may be written as ÐB  :3 Ñ where :3 œ 83 is positive. So we may write 0 ÐBÑ œ ÐB  :" ÑâÐB  :4 Ñ † ÐB#  ," B  -" ÑâÐB#  ,6 B  -6 ÑÞ Now it is clear that the leading coefficient of 0 ÐBÑ is ", and the constant term of 0 ÐBÑ is also positive since it is the product of all positive numbers. The constant term of 0 ÐBÑ œ   :3   -3 . By Lemma 4, the number of sign variations 4

6

3œ"

3œ"

in the coefficients of 0 ÐBÑ is even. > is even. From above we have >   =  5  !Þ Therefore >  5   =Þ Now if it happens that >  5 œ = then we let / œ > and we are done. Otherwise, if >  5  = then we have to argue about the first 5 factors in :ÐBÑÞ Having just established that the constant term in 0 ÐBÑ is positive, the sign of the constant term in :ÐBÑ is

the sign of "5 †   <5  œ the sign of "5 since all the <3 values are positive. If 5 is even 5

3œ"

then by Lemma %, :ÐBÑ has an even number of sign variations in its coefficients which means = is even. If 5 is odd then again by Lemma 4 we conclude = is odd. So 5 and = are even together or are odd together. Now consider that >  5  =  !Þ What kind of a positive number is this? Well > is even, and if 5 and = are both even then >  5  = must be even. By the same token, if 5 and = are both odd, then 5  = is still even, and since > is always even, >  Ð5  =Ñ must be even. Therefore >  5  = œ #@ for some positive integer @Þ Then Ð>  #@Ñ  5 œ =Þ Let / œ Ð>  #@ÑÞ All that remains is to show that Ð>  #@Ñ is a positive even integer. First, Ð>  #@Ñ œ =  5 and since =  5  !, we know Ð>  #@Ñ is a positive integer. Second, both > and #@ are even, so their difference Ð>  #@Ñ is even. In any case, there exists a positive even integer / such that /  5 œ =Þ So when = is larger than 5 , it is larger by a positive even integer. Q.E.D.

page 19

22. Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 6. Each negative root of :ÐBÑ corresponds to a positive root of :ÐBÑÞ That is, if +  ! and + is a zero of :ÐBÑ, then + is a positive zero of :ÐBÑÞ Descartes's Rule of Signs Lemma 6 Proof: The graph of the function C œ :ÐBÑ is just the graph of C œ :ÐBÑ reflected over the C-axis. So, if +  ! and :Ð+Ñ œ !, then +  !ß and when B œ +ß then :ÐBÑ œ :+ œ :Ð+Ñ œ !Þ So + is a positive zero of :BÞ Q.E.D.

23. Descartes's Rule of Signs Theorem Let :ÐBÑ be any polynomial with real coefficients. (Positive Roots) The number of positive roots of :ÐBÑ œ ! is either equal to the number of sign variations in the coefficients of :ÐBÑ or else is less than this number by an even integer. (Negative Roots) The number of negative roots of :ÐBÑ œ ! is either equal to the number of sign variations in the coefficients of :ÐBÑ or else is less than this number by an even integer. Note that when determining sign variations we can ignore terms with zero coefficients. Proof of Descartes's Rule of Signs Theorem: The statement about the number of positive roots of :ÐBÑ œ ! is exactly the statement of Lemma 5 that has already been proved. To prove the statement about the number of negative roots of :ÐBÑ we need only apply Lemma 6. Each negative root of :ÐBÑ corresponds to a positive root of :ÐBÑ and by Lemma 5, the number of positive roots of any polynomial Ölike :ÐBÑ × is either equal to the number of sign variations in that polynomial Ö :ÐBÑ ×, or is less than the number of sign variations in that polynomial Ö :ÐBÑ × by a positive even integer. Q.E.D.

page 20

24. Lemma On Continuous Functions. Let 0 ÐBÑ and 1ÐBÑ be two continuous real-valued functions with a common domain that is an open interval Ð+ß ,Ñ. Furthermore let - − Ð+ß ,Ñ and assume that except when B œ - we have 0 ÐBÑ œ 1ÐBÑ for all B − Ð+ß ,ÑÞ Then we must also have 0 Ð-Ñ œ 1Ð-ÑÞ Proof of Lemma On Continuous Functions: By contradiction. Assume 0 Ð-Ñ Á 1Ð-ÑÞ Without loss of generality we may assume 0 Ð-Ñ  1Ð-Ñ 1Ð-Ñ  0 Ð-Ñ Þ Note that %  !Þ By the continuity of both 0 ÐBÑ and 1ÐBÑ at # B œ - , there exists a $0  0 and there exists a $1  ! such that for all B − Ð+ß ,Ñ and choose % œ

1) if !  B  -   $0 then 0 ÐBÑ  0 Ð-Ñ  %

and

2) if !  B  -   $1 then 1ÐBÑ  1Ð-Ñ  %

Let $ œ 738Ö$0 ß $1 × and choose B" − Ð+ß ,Ñ such that !  B"  -   $ Þ Note that since B" is chosen so that B" Á - , we must have 1ÐB" Ñ œ 0 ÐB" ÑÞ Also, by our choice of $ , parts 1) and 2) above apply so we can conclude that 0 ÐB" Ñ  0 Ð-Ñ  % and with a little bit of thought, we can see that we must also have 1Ð-Ñ  1ÐB" Ñ  %Þ So adding both inequalities we must have 0 ÐB" Ñ  0 Ð-Ñ  1Ð-Ñ  1ÐB" Ñ  #% œ 1Ð-Ñ  0 Ð-ÑÞ Now since 1ÐB" Ñ œ 0 ÐB" Ñ the left expression simplifies and may be rearranged so that we have 1Ð-Ñ  0 Ð-Ñ  1Ð-Ñ  0 Ð-Ñ, a contradiction. Q.E.D.

25. Theorem On the Equality of Polynomials Let :ÐBÑ œ +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! and let ;ÐBÑ œ ,7 B7  ,7" B7"  â  ,$ B$  ,# B#  ," B  ,! be any two real polynomials of degrees 8 and 7 respectively. If for all real numbers B, :ÐBÑ œ ;ÐBÑ then 1) 7 œ 8 and 2) for all 3, if 0 Ÿ 3 Ÿ 8 then +3 œ ,3 Þ Proof of Theorem On the Equality of Polynomials: The following informal argument can be formalized using Mathematical Induction. However, we prefer a more relaxed discussion that emphasizes technique over formality. First note that if +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B  +! œ ,7 B7  ,7" B7"  â  ,$ B$  ,# B#  ," B  ,! for all B, we may let B œ ! to conclude that +! œ ,! Þ proof continued on the next page

page 21

Next, we subtract the common constant term from both sides of the equation to conclude that for all B +8 B8  +8" B8"  â  +$ B$  +# B#  +" B œ ,7 B7  ,7" B7"  â  ,$ B$  ,# B#  ," BÞ Now divide both sides of this last equation by B, assuming B Á !. Then we have: +8 B8"  +8" B8#  â  +$ B#  +# B  +" œ ,7 B7"  ,7" B7#  â  ,$ B#  ,# B  ," for all nonzero B. However, both of these last polynomials are defined and are continuous in a neighborhood about B œ !, so we may apply the above Lemma with - œ ! to conclude this new equation is true for all Bß including when B œ !Þ Now we can repeat the above argument and let B œ ! to conclude that +" œ ," ß and we again subtract this common constant term from both sides of the last equation to obtain the statement that for all B +8 B8"  +8" B8#  â  +$ B#  +# B œ ,7 B7"  ,7" B7#  â  ,$ B#  ,# BÞ Again we divide both sides by B to obtain the simpler equation that +8 B82  +8" B83  â  +$ B  +# œ ,7 B72  ,7" B73  â  ,$ B  ,# Þ Even though this equation is only true for nonzero B because we just divided by B, we can apply the above Lemma to conclude this equation must also be true when B œ !Þ So again we may let B œ ! to conclude that +# œ ,# Þ Clearly this argument may be continued to repeatedly pick off each of the coefficients one by one in order until we run out of both coefficients. So every coefficient of :ÐBÑ matches the same degree term coefficient of ;ÐBÑ. That we must run out of both coefficients at the same time is because otherwise, if :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ had different degrees, we could find a ! coefficient in one of these polynomials that would match a nonzero coefficient in the other and that would be a contradiction. A final note about this theorem and its lemma is that the lemma is very easy for a non-calculus student to understand when continuity is presented in an intuitive way (no epsilons or deltas!). This theorem can also be proved assuming the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, but the advantage of this alternative approach is that we don't have to assume the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra and we can introduce the fundamental property of continuity of polynomials. Q.E.D.

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26. Theorem Euclidean Algorithm for Polynomials Let :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ be any two polynomials with degrees   1. Then there exists a polynomial .ÐBÑ such that .ÐBÑ divides evenly into both :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ. Moreover, .ÐBÑ is such that if +ÐBÑ is any other common divisor of :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ, then +ÐBÑ divides evenly into .ÐBÑ. The polynomial .ÐBÑ is called the Greatest Common Divisor of :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ is sometimes denoted by KGHÐ:ÐBÑß ;ÐBÑÑÞ Except for constant multiples, .ÐBÑ is unique. Proof of the Euclidean Algorithm for Polynomials Without loss of generality we assume the degree of :ÐBÑ is larger than or equal to the degree of ;ÐBÑÞ By the Division Algorithm we may write :ÐBÑ œ ;ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ

(1)

where ;" ÐBÑ is the quotient polynomial and <" ÐBÑ is the remainder. If <" ÐBÑ ´ ! then we stop. Otherwise, if <" ÐBÑ ´ Î ! we note from the above equation that any common divisor of both ;ÐBÑ and <" ÐBÑ must be a divisor of the right side of the above equation and therefore a divisor of the left side. Any common divisor of ;ÐBÑ and <" ÐBÑ must be a divisor of :ÐBÑÞ Next, by writing :ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ œ <" ÐBÑ we can see that every common divisor of :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ must be a divisor of <" ÐBÑ and thus a common divisor of ;ÐBÑ and <" ÐBÑÞ So KGHÐ:ÐBÑß ;ÐBÑÑ œ KGHÐ;ÐBÑß <" ÐBÑÑÞ We continue by applying the Division Algorithm again to write ;ÐBÑ œ < " ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ  <# ÐBÑ

(2)

If <# ÐBÑ ´ ! we stop. Otherwise, repeating the above reasoning, KGHÐ;ÐBÑß <" ÐBÑÑ œ KGHÐ<" ÐBÑß <# ÐBÑÑ. Now apply the Division Algorithm again. <" ÐBÑ œ <# ÐBÑ † ;$ ÐBÑ  <$ ÐBÑ

(3)

If <$ ÐBÑ ´ ! we stop. Otherwise we note KGHÐ<" ÐBÑß <# ÐBÑÑ œ KGHÐ<# ÐBÑß <$ ÐBÑÑ and we continue to apply the Division Algorithm to get <2 ÐBÑ œ <3 ÐBÑ † ;4 ÐBÑ  <4 ÐBÑ proof continued on the nex page

page 23

(4)

If <% ÐBÑ ´ ! we stop. Otherwise we continue this process. However, we cannot this process forever because the degrees of the remainders <3 ÐBÑ keep decreasing by 1. degreeÐ<% ÐBÑÑ  degreeÐ<$ ÐBÑÑ  degreeÐ<# ÐBÑÑ  degreeÐ<" ÐBÑÑ Ÿ degreeÐ;ÐBÑÑ So after applying the Division Algorithm at most the number of times that is the degree of ;ÐBÑ we must have some remainder become the identically zero polynomial. We claim KGHÐ:ÐBÑß ;ÐBÑÑ is the last nonzero remainder. For example, suppose <8# ÐBÑ œ <8" ÐBÑ † ;8 ÐBÑ  <8 ÐBÑ

Ð8Ñ

and <8" ÐBÑ œ <8 ÐBÑ † ;8" ÐBÑ

Ð8  "Ñ

where <8" ÐBÑ ´ ! and is not written. The last equation shows <8 ÐBÑ is a divisor of <8" ÐBÑ so KGHÐ<8" ÐBÑß <8 ÐBÑÑ œ <8 ÐBÑ. Now KGHÐ:ÐBÑß ;ÐBÑÑ œ KGHÐ;ÐBÑß <" ÐBÑÑ œ KGHÐ<" ÐBÑß <# ÐBÑÑ œ KGHÐ<# ÐBÑß <$ ÐBÑÑ œ â œ KGHÐ<8" ÐBÑß <8 ÐBÑÑ œ <8 ÐBÑ, the last nonzero remainder. Q.E.D.

page 24

27. Corollary to the Euclidean Algorithm for Polynomials The KGH of any two polynomials :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ may be expressed as a linear combination of :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑÞ Proof of the Corollary to the Euclidean Algorithm for Polynomials. The following were the series of equations that led up to the creation of the KGH polynomial. :ÐBÑ œ ;ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ

Ð"Ñ

;ÐBÑ œ < " ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ  <# ÐBÑ

Ð#Ñ

<" ÐBÑ œ <# ÐBÑ † ;$ ÐBÑ  <$ ÐBÑ

Ð$Ñ

<2 ÐBÑ œ <3 ÐBÑ † ;4 ÐBÑ  <4 ÐBÑ

Ð%Ñ

ã <8$ ÐBÑ œ <8# ÐBÑ † ;8" ÐBÑ  <8" ÐBÑ

Ð8  "Ñ

<8# ÐBÑ œ <8" ÐBÑ † ;8 ÐBÑ  <8 ÐBÑ

Ð8Ñ

Now starting with the last equation, we solve for the KGH. <8 ÐBÑ œ <8# ÐBÑ  <8" ÐBÑ † ;8 ÐBÑ

ЇÑ

Note this shows how to write the KGH as a linear combination of <8# ÐBÑ and <8" ÐBÑÞ But in the next to the last equation we can solve for <8" ÐBÑ and substitute into ЇÑ. <8 ÐBÑ œ <8# ÐBÑ  Ò <8$ ÐBÑ  <8# ÐBÑ † ;8" ÐBÑ Ó † ;8 ÐBÑ œ <8# ÐBÑ  <8$ ÐBÑ † ;8 ÐBÑ  <8# ÐBÑ † ;8" ÐBÑ † ;8 ÐBÑ œ Ò"  ;8" ÐBÑ † ;8 ÐBÑÓ † <8# ÐBÑ  Ò  ;8 ÐBÑÓ † <8$ ÐBÑ We have now shown how to write <8 ÐBÑ as a linear combination of <8# ÐBÑ and <8$ ÐBÑÞ Clearly we can continue to work backwards, and solve each next equation for the previous remainder, and then substitute that remainder (which is a linear combination of its two previous remainders) into our equation to continually write <8 ÐBÑ as a linear combination of the two most recent remainders. proof continued on the next page

page 25

As we work our way up the list, we will eventually have <8 ÐBÑ œ 0 ÐBÑ † <1 ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † <2 ÐBÑ and when we solve the second equation for <# ÐBÑ and substitute we get <8 ÐBÑ œ 0 ÐBÑ † <" ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑÒ ;ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ Ó œ 0 ÐBÑ † <" ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ;ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † <" ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ œ Ò 0 ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ Ó † <" ÐBÑ  Ò 1ÐBÑ Ó † ;ÐBÑ Lastly we solve the first equation for <" ÐBÑ and substitute and we get <8 ÐBÑ œ Ò 0 ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ Ó † Ò :ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ Ó  Ò 1ÐBÑ Ó † ;ÐBÑ œ Ò 0 ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ Ó † :ÐBÑ  Ò 0 ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ Ó † ;ÐBÑ † ;" ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ œ Ò 0 ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ Ó † :ÐBÑ  Ò 1ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ  0 ÐBÑ Ó † ;" ÐBÑ  1ÐBÑ † ;ÐBÑ

This shows that the KGH can be written as a linear combination of :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑÞ Q.E.D.

page 26

28. Lemma 1 for Partial Fractions If 0 ÐBÑ œ

+ÐBÑ where KGHÐ,ÐBÑß -ÐBÑÑ œ " then there exist polynomials .ÐBÑ and /ÐBÑ such ,ÐBÑ-ÐBÑ

that 0 ÐBÑ œ

.ÐBÑ /ÐBÑ  ,ÐBÑ -ÐBÑ

Proof of Lemma 1 for Partial Fractions The two polynomials ,ÐBÑ and -ÐBÑ are called relatively prime when their KGH is ". Of course this means that ,ÐBÑ and -ÐBÑ have no common factor. Apply the Corollary to the Euclidean Algorithm for polynomials to construct polynomials =ÐBÑ and >ÐBÑ such that " œ =ÐBÑ † ,ÐBÑ  >ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ Then multiply both sides of this equation by +ÐBÑ to get +ÐBÑ œ +ÐBÑ † =ÐBÑ † ,ÐBÑ  +ÐBÑ † >ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ and finally divide both sides of this last equation by the product ,ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ +ÐBÑ +ÐBÑ † =ÐBÑ † ,ÐBÑ +ÐBÑ † >ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ œ  ,ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ ,ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ ,ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ

0 ÐBÑ œ

+ÐBÑ +ÐBÑ † =ÐBÑ +ÐBÑ † >ÐBÑ œ  ,ÐBÑ † -ÐBÑ -ÐBÑ ,ÐBÑ

Now let .ÐBÑ œ +ÐBÑ † >ÐBÑ and let /ÐBÑ œ +ÐBÑ † =ÐBÑÞ Q.E.D.

page 27

29. Lemma 2 for Partial Fractions If 0 ÐBÑ œ

:ÐBÑ then there exists a polynomial 1ÐBÑ and for " Ÿ 3 Ÿ 7 there exist polynomials  ;ÐBÑ 7

=3 ÐBÑ each with degree less than ;ÐBÑ such that

0 ÐBÑ œ

:ÐBÑ =" ÐBÑ =# ÐBÑ =$ ÐBÑ =7 ÐBÑ   â 7 œ 1ÐBÑ  # $  ;ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ 7  ;ÐBÑ   ;ÐBÑ 

Proof of Lemma 2 for Partial Fractions Apply the Division Algorithm for the first time to write À

:ÐBÑ œ ;ÐBÑ †  ;" ÐBÑ   <" ÐBÑÞ Note the degree of <" ÐBÑ is less than the degree of ;ÐBÑÞ Now divide ;" ÐBÑ by ;ÐBÑ to get a second quotient and a second remainder so we may write :ÐBÑ œ ;ÐBÑ †  ;ÐBÑ † ;# ÐBÑ  <# ÐBÑ   <" ÐBÑ

:ÐBÑ œ  ;ÐBÑ # † ;# ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ † <# ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ Note that the degree of <# ÐBÑ is less than the degree of ;ÐBÑÞ Now divide ;# ÐBÑ by ;ÐBÑ to get a third quotient and a third remainder and write :ÐBÑ œ  ;ÐBÑ # †  ;ÐBÑ † ;$ ÐBÑ  <$ ÐBÑ   ;ÐBÑ † <# ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ

:ÐBÑ œ  ;ÐBÑ $ † ;$ ÐBÑ   ;ÐBÑ # † <$ ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ † <# ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ We continue to divide each newest quotient ;3 ÐBÑ by ;ÐBÑ to get a newer quotient and a newer remainder and substitute for the ;3 ÐBÑ quotient. Each remainder has a degree smaller than the degree of ;ÐBÑÞ :ÐBÑ œ  ;ÐBÑ $ †  ;ÐBÑ † ;% ÐBÑ  <% ÐBÑ    ;ÐBÑ # † <$ ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ † <# ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ

:ÐBÑ œ  ;ÐBÑ % † ;% ÐBÑ   ;ÐBÑ $ † <% ÐBÑ   ;ÐBÑ # † <$ ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ † <# ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ We may continue breaking down and substituting for each ;3 ÐBÑ quotient until we have

:ÐBÑ œ  ;ÐBÑ 7 † ;7 ÐBÑ   ; B 7" † <7 ÐBÑ  â   ;ÐBÑ # † <$ ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ † <# ÐBÑ  <" ÐBÑ Finally we divide both sides of this last equation by  ;ÐBÑ 7 to get 0 ÐBÑ œ

:ÐBÑ <7 ÐBÑ <$ ÐBÑ <# ÐBÑ <" ÐBÑ â   â  7 œ ;7 ÐBÑ   ;ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ  ;ÐBÑ 7  ;ÐBÑ 7#  ;ÐBÑ 7"

Now we may let 1ÐBÑ œ ;7 ÐBÑ and let =3 ÐBÑ œ <73" ÐBÑÞ Q.E.D.

page 28

30. Partial Fraction Decomposition Theorem Let

:ÐBÑ be a rational function where :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ are polynomials such that the degree of :ÐBÑ ;ÐBÑ

is less than the degree of ;ÐBÑÞ Then there exist algebraic fractions J" ß J# ß á ß J< such that :ÐBÑ œ J"  J#  â  J< and where each J3 fraction is one of two forms: ;ÐBÑ E3 E5 B  F5 or where E3 , +3 ß ,3 ß E5 ß F5 , +5 ß ,5 ß -5 are all real numbers and 8 # 3 Ð+3 B  ,3 Ñ Ð+5 B  ,5 B  -5 Ñ75 the 83 and the 75 are positive integers and each quadratic expression +5 B#  ,5 B  -5 has a negative discriminant. Proof of the Partial Fraction Decomposition Theorem Since ;ÐBÑ is a polynomial, by the Linear and Irreducible Quadratic Factors Theorem we may write ;ÐBÑ œ   Ð+3 B  ,3 Ñ:3  †   Ð+5 B#  ,5 B  -5 Ñ;5  4

6

3œ"

5œ"

where for each 3, Ð+3 B  ,3 Ñ is a real linear factor of ;ÐBÑ of multiplicity :3 and for each 5 , Ð+5 B#  ,5 B  -5 Ñ is an irreducible quadratic factor of ;ÐBÑ of multiplicity ;5 Þ The +3 ß ,3 are different from the +5 ß ,5 Þ Since the real linear and irreducible quadratic factors have no factors in common their KGH is " and we may apply Lemma 1 for Partial Fractions to write: :ÐBÑ œ ;ÐBÑ

+ÐBÑ



 Ð+3 B  ,3 Ñ:3 4

3œ"





,ÐBÑ

  Ð+5 B#  ,5 B  -5 Ñ;5  6

5œ"

Now for each different 3, each factor of the form Ð+3 B  ,3 Ñ:3 is different from the next so we may again apply Lemma 1 for Partial Fractions 4  " times to split the first fraction above into a sum of 4 other fractions. For each of those fractions that have an exponent of # or higher in the denominator we apply Lemma 2 for Partial Fractions :3  " more times to split each denominator with Ð+3 B  ,3 Ñ:3 into a sum of :3 more fractions. For each different 5 , each factor of the form Ð+5 B#  ,5 B  -5 Ñ;5 is different from the next so we may again apply Lemma 1 for Partial Fractions 5  " times to split the second fraction above into a sum of 5 other fractions. For each of those fractions that have an exponent of # or higher in the denominator we apply Lemma 2 for Partial Fractions ;5  " more times to split each denominator with Ð+5 B#  ,5 B  -5 Ñ;5 into a sum of ;5 more fractions. As a final note, the 1ÐBÑ term that appears in Lemma 2 for Partial Fractions will be the ! polynomial because we are assuming the degree of :ÐBÑ is strictly less than that of ;ÐBÑÞ So our partial fraction decomposition really does break down into a sum of pure algebraic fractions. Q.E.D.

page 29

31. Partial Fraction Decomposition Coefficient Theorem Let

:ÐBÑ be a rational function where :ÐBÑ and ;ÐBÑ are polynomials such that the degree of :ÐBÑ ;ÐBÑ

is less than the degree of ;ÐBÑ. If B œ + is a root of ;ÐBÑ œ ! of multiplicity ", then in the partial fraction decomposition of

:ÐBÑ E :Ð+Ñ which contains a term of the form , the constant E œ w Þ ;ÐBÑ ÐB  +Ñ ; Ð+Ñ

Proof of the Partial Fraction Decomposition Coefficient Theorem: Assume

:ÐBÑ E :ÐBÑ œ  0 ÐBÑ is the partial fraction decomposition of where 0 ÐBÑ is itself ;ÐBÑ ÐB  +Ñ ;ÐBÑ

a rational function, but is such that 0 Ð+Ñ is well-defined. In fact, 0 ÐBÑ will be continuous at B œ +Þ Then

ÐB  +Ñ † :ÐBÑ œ E  0 ÐBÑÐB  +Ñ ;ÐBÑ

Since B œ + is a simple zero of ;ÐBÑ,

ÐB  +Ñ † :ÐBÑ ! is an indeterminate form and we may BÄ+ ;ÐBÑ ! lim

thus apply L'Hopital's Rule when evaluating the limit. Taking the limit on both sides of the above equation we have

ÐB  +Ñ:ÐBÑ œ lim E  0 ÐBÑÐB  +Ñ BÄ+ BÄ+ ;ÐBÑ lim

" † :ÐBÑ  ÐB  +Ñ † :w ÐBÑ œ lim E  lim 0 ÐBÑ † lim ÐB  +Ñ BÄ+ BÄ+ BÄ+ BÄ+ ; w ÐBÑ lim

lim

:ÐBÑ

BÄ+ ; w ÐBÑ

œ E  lim 0 ÐBÑ † ! BÄ+

:Ð+Ñ œ E  0 Ð+Ñ † ! œ E ; w Ð+Ñ Q.E.D.

page 30

Some Polynomial Theorems

Decomposition of a rational function and Descartes's Rule of Signs. It is rare to find proofs of either of these last two major theorems in any precalculus text. 1.

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