Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

1

Scheduling Fairness of Real-Time Scheduling Algorithms in Wireless Multimedia Application Binyang Xu, Shaoqian Li and Heping Pu

Abstract This paper investigates the fairness of different scheduling algorithms for real-time multimedia applications over wireless shared link. We evaluate the scheduling fairness, which usually concerns with packet delay or throughput in existing literatures, by jointly considering traffic packet delay, packet drop rate and throughput requirements. A theoretical analysis method based on probability, statistics and random processes is presented to derive allocated scheduling opportunities from algorithms’ priority functions. Through study of two classical real-time scheduling algorithms: modified largest weighted delay first (MLWDF) and exponential rule (Exp), it is found that these two algorithms provide limited scheduling fairness in typical voice and video applications. Therefore, a modified exponential rule (MExp) is proposed to enhance the scheduling fairness by timely scheduling and optimal design of scheduling priority function. The algorithms are evaluated through system level simulation on high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) shared channel. Numerical results show that the MExp outperforms the two baseline algorithms in system outage capacity and throughput. Index Terms MExp, outage capacity, quality of service (QoS), scheduling fairness, scheduling opportunity,

I. I NTRODUCTION Wireless industry has been making its way to the field of real-time multimedia applications. Some traditional wire-line services have been realized on wireless links, and many new wireless services have been recently specified for business, learning and entertainment. Different from wire-line communication, wireless applications are subject to adverse propagation loss, multipath fading, Doppler spectrum shift and open air interference, which account for scarcity of radio resources and difficulties in wireless resource management. Providing wireless heterogeneous traffics with quality of service (QoS) guarantees over the open air turns out to be a challenging issue. And it gets much more complex for real-time wireless traffics, such as voice conversation, video communication [1] and interactive games, which are sensitive to transmission delay. A great deal of research efforts have been devoted to traffic QoS provisioning and system capacity maximizing through optimal design of radio resource management strategies. Wireless services in the 3G and beyond 3G cellular systems are getting packet-oriented for easy traffic integration across heterogeneous networks based on IP protocol [2]. It’s widely recognized that, for packet data applications over both wire-line and wireless channels, multiplexing transmission is a quite efficient way of resource utilization. The 3G cellular networks are providing high speed packet applications with QoS guarantees on shared transport channels in the high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) [3] and CDMA/HDR [4] systems. In radio resource management, packet schedulers are responsible for resource division and allocation among different traffic sessions and mobile users. As mentioned above, an efficient scheduling mechanism should not only provide wireless traffics with QoS guarantees but also make good use of radio resources. In multimedia application environment, component traffic sessions should be allocated proper radio resource This work was supported in part by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program, No.: 2005AA123910) and Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, No.: 60496313). Binyang Xu and Shaoqian Li are with the National Key Lab of Communication, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, P.R.C.. Fax: +86-28-8320 2174 E-mail: [email protected] Heping Pu is with the School of Applied Mathematics, UESTC.

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

2

shares (scheduling opportunities) proportional to their QoS requirements. Inappropriate resource allocation would lead to decrease in resource utilization. A metric for the fitness of allocated scheduling opportunity is termed as scheduling fairness, which is usually defined on traffic throughput or packet delay in existing literatures [5][6]. The max-min fairness [7] and proportional fairness [8] are two well-known fairness criteria for traffic throughput. Quantitative measure of fairness and design of fairness index functions for various performance objectives are investigated in [9]. In this paper, we evaluate the scheduling fairness by jointly considering traffic packet delay, packet drop rate and throughput requirements. General wireless schedulers assign scheduling opportunities to traffic sessions by means of scheduling priority functions. Therefore, analysis of these functions plays a significant part in scheduling fairness study. However, few efforts have been devoted to this. This paper proposes a theoretical analysis method based on probability, statistics and random processes to derive allocated scheduling opportunities from algorithms’ priority functions and guide the optimal design of scheduling algorithms. Two throughput optimal real-time scheduling algorithms, modified largest weighted delay first (MLWDF) [10][11] and exponential rule (Exp) [12][13], are adopted as the starting point. Analysis shows that the two algorithms provide limited scheduling fairness in typical wireless voice and video applications. Herein, we put forward a novel modified exponential rule (MExp) for scheduling fairness enhancement. The study is verified through system level simulation based on HSDPA system. Numerical results show that MExp can achieve considerable gains in system outage capacity and throughput over the two baseline algorithms. The rest of this paper is organized as follows: In section II, we outline the two classical scheduling algorithms, introduce the theoretical analysis method and investigate two algorithms’ scheduling fairness properties; The MExp algorithm is proposed and its scheduling fairness is studied in Section III; Section IV presents system level algorithm simulation environment; Numerical results and discussions are exhibited in section V; The work is concluded in Section VI. II. MLWDF E XP AND A NALYSIS OF S CHEDULING FAIRNESS In wireless multimedia application, a serving node usually keeps multiple classes of traffic session connections with mobile users. A scheduler in the node will manage one session queue per class of traffic session per user and decide the scheduling order by a priority function. Generally, the scheduling priority can be a function of channel condition, traffic QoS requirements, session queue’s state or information pertained to the packet in the head of session queue (line) (HoL). In the following formulation, i and j represent user and class of traffic session indices respectively; ri (t) is the channel capacity of user i at time t; r˜i,j (t) is the average data rate perceived by traffic session j of user i over time period T ; r¯j denotes the data rate requirement of traffic session j; wi,j (t) is the waiting time of HoL packet in session queue j of user i at time t; and Tj stands for the packet delay bound of traffic session j. A. Algorithm Description The MLWDF scheduler gives scheduling opportunity to session queue q(i, j) at scheduling time t [10]: ri (t) · wi,j (t)] r˜i,j (t) where αj = − log(δj )/Tj and δj is packet drop rate (PDR) limit of traffic session j. The Exp rule assigns the highest scheduling priority to session queue (i, j) [12]: q(i, j) = arg max[αj · i,j

q(i, j) = arg max[αj · i,j

where AW =

ri (t) αj · wi,j (t) − AW √ · exp( )] r˜i,j (t) 1 + AW 1 XX αj wi,j (t) C i j

C is the total queue number in the scheduler and αj is defined as in (1).

(1)

(2)

3

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

B. Analysis of Scheduling Fairness Consider a scheduling model with two classes of traffic queues, Qa and Qb , in the scheduling buffer. The two kinds of queues hold packets for traffic sessions Sa and Sb with data rate requirements of r¯a and r¯b respectively. The transmission delay of packets in Sa is bounded by Ta , and that of packets in Sb is bounded by Tb . Any packets exceeding the bounds are to be discarded and contribute to increase of PDR. The PDR limit for Sa is δa , and the limit for Sb is δb . At the beginning of scheduling, each session queue is assumed to have obtained desired traffic throughput, i.e., r˜i,j (0)(j ∈ {a, b}) for all i are set to the required traffic data rate r¯j . And wireless channels are supposed to be static during one scheduling period. For the model, multipath Rayleigh fading is considered to characterize wireless channels. So, channel states hi (t)s can be treated as independent stochastic processes with random variables hi (t0 )s subject to Rayleigh distribution at scheduling time t0 . Proposition 1: For application of two kinds of real-time traffics, corresponding to two classes of session queues Qa and Qb in the scheduling buffer, the scheduling opportunities MLWDF and Exp allocate to queues of Qb (denoted by PM L {t 7→ Qb }) and PExp {t 7→ Qb }) are statistically deterministic. Proof: Packet generating processes for real-time traffics can be usually modeled by Poisson processes. When the queue numbers of Qa and Qb are large1 , the waiting time of HoL packets wi,j (t) across all queues of the same class j at scheduling time t0 can be approximately characterized by exponentially distributed random variable wj 2 with its rate λj related to traffic PDR limit δj . Specifically, the probability density function (PDF) of wj is given by (

fwj (x) = where, λj satisfies

Z

Tj

0

λj exp (−λj x), x > 0; 0, otherwise.

(3)

λj exp(−λj x)dx = 1 − δj

which leads to λj = − ln(δj )/Tj . The PDF for channel state random variable h 3 is given by fh (x) =

   x

σ2   0,

exp(−

x2 ), 2σ 2

x > 0;

(4)

otherwise.

For MLWDF algorithm, the scheduling priority function of (1) can be depicted by random variable function ξjI r ξjI = αj · · wj r˜j The probability MLWDF allocates its scheduling opportunity to queues of Qb can be formulated as PM L {t 7→ Qb } = Pr{ξaI ≤ ξbI } = Pr{

αa r˜b ra wb · · ≤ } r˜a αb rb wa

Let kj = αj /˜ rj , j ∈ {a, b}, k = ka /kb , ψ = ra /rb and φI = wb /wa . By Shannon’s theorem, ra log2 (1 + ha ) ln (1 + ha ) ψ= = = rb log2 (1 + hb ) ln (1 + hb ) where, channel bandwidth, transmit and noise powers have been normalized. 1

This assumption is followed throughout the paper. In the proof, time symbol and user subscript are omitted for brevity of notation, e.g., wj stands for wi,j (t0 ) . 3 The subscript  of h , forthcoming r and ψ is index of user holding session queue of class j. 2

(5)

4

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

Let ψ = ln(1 + h ),  ∈ {a, b}. Then the PDF for ψ is given by  x   e −1

fψ (x) =  

0,

exp[−

σ2

(ex − 1)2 ], 2σ 2

x > 0;

(6)

otherwise.

When h is in the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) regime4 , (6) can be approximated by (7) through Taylor series expansion.   x2  x exp(− ), x > 0; fψ (x) = (7) σ2 2σ 2   0, otherwise. Then, the PDF of ψ can be obtained   

2x , x > 0; (1 + x2 )2 fψ (x) =   0, otherwise.

(8)

And PDF of φI is given by   

λa λ b , x > 0; fφI (x) = (λa + λb x)2   0, x ≤ 0. Note that random variable functions ψ and φI are independent, (5) is computed as follows [14]: PM L {t 7→ Qb } = Pr{k · ψ ≤ φI } Z

= =

+∞

0

Z

0

y/k

2x fφI (y)dxdy (1 + x2 )2

π λ2b k 3 − λ2a k λa · 2 + 2 2 2 2 2 (λa + λb k ) λb (λa + λ2b k 2 )

− ln(

(9)

2λa λb k 2 λb k )· 2 λa (λ2a + λ2b k 2 )

which concludes the proof of Proposition 1 for MLWDF. And for the Exp rule, the scheduling priority function of (2) can be alternatively formulated as r αj wj −c α w −c √ ) = kj · r · exp( j j√ ) ξjII = αj · · exp( r˜j 1+ c 1+ c rj , j ∈ {a, b} and c = AW . where kj = αj /˜ Then the scheduling opportunity allocated to queues of Qb is given by αb wb − αa wa ka ra √ ≤ exp( )} PExp {t 7→ Qb } = Pr{ξaII ≤ ξbII } = Pr{ · 1+ c kb r b

(10)

Let k = ka /kb , ψ = ra /rb and define

. √ φII = exp[(αb wb − αa wa ) (1 + c)] . √ pj = αj (1 + c), j ∈ {a, b}

4

For high h , the PDF of ψ becomes rather complex. Without lose of generality, we here take into account low SNR regime for simplicity.

5

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

TABLE I Q O S PARAMETERS FOR VOICE AND V IDEO T RAFFICS Class of

Delay

Packet Drop

Required Data

Traffic Session

Bound Tj (ms)

Rate Limit δj

Rate r¯j (kbps)

Voice

80

0.01

32

Video

280

0.001

144

Then the PDF for φII is given by

fφII (x) =

 λa λb λb ln x    · exp(− ),    (p λ + p λ ) x p b a a b b  

λa λb

 · exp(   (pb λa + pa λb ) x      0,

λa ln x ), pa

x ≤ 1; 0 < x < 1; otherwise.

Thus, with the given PDF of ψ in (8) and independent ψ and φII , (10) can be figured out PExp {t 7→ Qb } = Pr{k · ψ ≤ φII } Z

Z

2x fφII (y)dxdy 0 0 (1 + x2 )2 Z 1 y λa λ b λa ln y [ )dy = exp( 2 2 p b λ a + p a λb 0 y + k pa Z 1 y λb ln x + exp(− )dy] 2 2 pb 0 y +k

=

+∞

y/k

(11)

So ends the proof of Proposition 1 for Exp. If there are M queues of Qa and N queues of Qb , the ratio of scheduling opportunities for individual queue qa and queue qb is given by 1 − P {t 7→ Qb } P {t 7→ Qb } : M N 1 − Pr{ξa ≤ ξb } Pr{ξa ≤ ξb } = : M N From the perspective of traffic QoS requirements, a fair scheduler should keep r¯a r¯b Pb {t 7→ qa }: Pb {t 7→ qb } = f (δa ) · : f (δb ) · Ta Tb P {t 7→ qa }: P {t 7→ qb } =

(12)

(13)

where, f (.) should be a positive, nonlinear and monotonically decreasing function. Here f (.) takes the form of logarithm function. Then, (13) becomes r¯b r¯a (14) Pb {t 7→ qa }: Pb {t 7→ qb } = − log(δa ) · : − log(δb ) · Ta Tb An efficient scheduling mechanism should keep (12) and (14) as close as possible to provide adequate scheduling opportunity for each traffic session. For voice [15] and video [16] applications with their QoS parameters listed in Table. I, by (14), an efficient scheduling mechanism will keep Pb {t 7→ qvo }: Pb {t 7→ qvi } ≈ 0.4: 0.6

(15)

6

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

The scheduling opportunities MLWDF allocates to individual voice or video session queue can be figured out by substituting the QoS parameters into (9) and (12). So we have PM L {t 7→ qvo }: PM L {t 7→ qvi } = 0.79: 0.21, f or M : N = 1: 1; PM L {t 7→ qvo }: PM L {t 7→ qvi } = 0.88: 0.12, f or M : N = 1: 2; PM L {t 7→ qvo }: PM L {t 7→ qvi } = 0.65: 0.35, f or M : N = 2: 1;

(16)

In (16), three kinds of traffic load settings for voice and video applications are considered. The fairness index (FI) function defined on resource demand in [9] is adopted as one of the metrics of scheduling fairness. P [ xj ]2 f (x) = (17) P n x2j where

(

xj =

aj /dj , a j < dj ; 1, otherwise.

dj is scheduling opportunity demand of traffic session j, and aj is the corresponding allocation. By (15), (16) and (17), the scheduling fairness indices of MLWDF for the voice and video applications can be obtained F IM L = 0.81, f or M : N = 1: 1; F IM L = 0.69, f or M : N = 1: 2; (18) F IM L = 0.94, f or M : N = 2: 1; For Exp rule, we can get the following results by substituting the traffic QoS parameters into (11) and (12). PExp {t 7→ qvo }: PExp {t 7→ qvi } = 0.99: 0.01, f or M : N = 1: 1; PExp {t 7→ qvo }: PExp {t 7→ qvi } = 0.995: 0.005, f or M : N = 1: 2; (19) PExp {t 7→ qvo }: PExp {t 7→ qvi } = 0.98: 0.02, f or M : N = 2: 1; Similarly, by (15), (19) and (17), the following scheduling fairness indices for Exp can be obtained F IExp = 0.52, f or M : N = 1: 1; F IExp = 0.51, f or M : N = 1: 2; F IExp = 0.53, f or M : N = 2: 1;

(20)

Comparison of (18), (20) with the ideal scheduling fairness index of 1 shows that there exists much fairness index room for MLWDF and Exp. In other words, these two algorithms provide limited scheduling fairness for these typical voice and video applications. III. ME XP AND I TS S CHEDULING FAIRNESS Preceding the presentation of the MExp algorithm, some comments are to be made on the scheduling properties with MLWDF and Exp. In MLWDF, the scheduling priority function is mainly composed of queue’s waiting time weighted by traffic factor αj and proportional fair term, as indicated by (1). Without considering queue HoL packet’s transmission delay bound, the MLWDF scheduler cannot discern whether a queue is urgent or not compared with its packet delay requirement. When it is applied to real-time multimedia application, a queue that has more stringent delay requirement and nearly hits its delay bound may not be timely served. Whereas, the scheduling priority is allocated to queue which has been waiting for a relatively long time but still has a long way to its delay deadline. This will lead to increase of obsolete packets in delay stringent traffic sessions. As for Exp rule, it decides the scheduling priority according to the difference between a queue’s weighted waiting time and average waiting time over all traffic queues in the scheduler, as formulated by (2). This brings certain fairness across diverse traffic sessions, however equalizes different queues’ packet

7

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

delay requirements. Therefore, the same problem as with MLWDF still exists, urgent queues can not be well distinguished from less urgent ones. And this problem accounts for inefficient real-time scheduling and results in unfair scheduling in MLWDF and Exp. To enhance the scheduling fairness, we substitute the difference between packet waiting time and its delay bound for the argument of exponential function in the Exp rule. In addition, traffic data rate requirement is introduced into the scheduling priority function. Then, a modified exponential rule (MExp) scheduling algorithm is proposed for real-time multimedia application, the scheduling policy of which can be formulated by: q(i, j) = arg max[αj · r¯j2 · i,j

ri (t) wi,j (t) − εTj · exp( )] r˜i,j (t) Tj

(21)

where ε is algorithm parameter set within [0, 1] for decreasing scheduling delay. For the proposed MExp, its scheduling fairness property is studied in the following. Proposition 2: For real-time multimedia application with two kinds of traffics, corresponding to two classes of session queues Qa and Qb in the scheduling buffer, the scheduling opportunity MExp allocates to queues of Qb (PM E {t 7→ Qb }) is statistically deterministic. Proof: By following the same notation and convention as in Section II, the scheduling priority function of MExp in (21) can be written as r wj −ε · Tj wj −ε · Tj ξjIII = αj · r¯2j · · exp( ) = κj · r · exp( ) r˜j Tj Tj where κj = αj ·

r¯j2 , r˜j

j ∈ {a, b}

Herein, the scheduling opportunity that the MExp scheduler assigns to queues of Qb is calculated by PM E {t 7→ Qb } = Pr{ξaIII ≤ ξbIII } = Pr{

κa ra Ta wb − Tb wa · ≤ exp( )} κb rb Ta Tb

(22)

Let φIII = exp[wb /Tb − wa /Ta ]. Then the PDF of φIII is derived as

fφIII (x) =

 Ta Tb λa λb    · exp(−Tb λb ln x),    (Ta λa + Tb λb ) x  

Ta Tb λa λb

 · exp(Ta λa ln x),   (Ta λa + Tb λb ) x      0,

x ≤ 1; 0 < x < 1; otherwise.

Let κ = κa /κb and ψ = ra /rb . With the given PDF of ψ in (8) and independent ψ and φIII , (22) can be figured out through double integration PM E {t 7→ Qb } = Pr{κ · ψ ≤ φIII } Z +∞ Z y/κ 2x = fφIII (y)dxdy 0 0 (1 + x2 )2 y Ta Tb λa λb Z 1 [ = exp(Ta λa ln y)dy 2 Ta λa + Tb λb 0 y + κ2 Z 1 y + exp(−Tb λb ln y)dy] 0 y 2 + κ2

(23)

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

8

By substituting the traffic QoS parameters of Table I into (23) and (12), we can get the following results for voice and video applications PM E {t 7→ qvo }: PM E {t 7→ qvi } = 0.23: 0.77, f or M : N = 1: 1; PM E {t 7→ qvo }: PM E {t 7→ qvi } = 0.37: 0.63, f or M : N = 1: 2; PM E {t 7→ qvo }: PM E {t 7→ qvi } = 0.13: 0.87, f or M : N = 2: 1;

(24)

By (15), (24) and (17), the scheduling fairness indices of MExp for the applications are F IM E = 0.93, f or M : N = 1: 1; F IM E = 0.998, f or M : N = 1: 2; F IM E = 0.79, f or M : N = 2: 1;

(25)

IV. A LGORITHM S IMULATION E NVIRONMENT We evaluate these scheduling algorithms and verify the effectiveness of the proposed analysis method through system level simulation in HSDPA system. The following gives a brief summary of the simulation environment. A. System Layout and Mobility Model The system is composed of 19 hexagonal cells with radius of 500 m. The central cell is equipped with omnidirectional antenna of unit gain, and the outer eighteen cells are treated as interference sources. Mobile users are uniformly distributed in the central cell. They move at constant speed of 5 km/h and change moving directions every 5 seconds with probability of 0.3. New directions are uniformly chosen within [−π/2, π/2]. B. Traffic Model Two typical wireless real-time traffics, voice and video, are adopted in the simulation. The voice sessions are modeled by ON/OFF process with exponentially distributed ON/OFF period [15]. The mean durations of ON and OFF periods are set to 1.0 and 1.5 seconds respectively. The video stream sessions are generated by [16] with the data rate parameter modified to provide 144 kbps traffic rate. The QoS parameters for the two kinds of traffic sessions are listed in Table I. C. Channel Model In the channel modeling, free-space propagation loss, long term shadow fading and short term fading are considered. The propagation loss is modeled according to [17] L = 128.1 + 37.6 log10 R where R is the base station-mobile user separation in kilometers and L is path loss in dB. The correlation model for shadow fading is modeled by [18] S = C(d) · S ∗ +

q

1 − | C(d) |2 · N (0, σ)

C(d) = e− ln 2·d/dcor

(26)

In (26), C(d) is a normalized autocorrelation function of shadowing and dcor is the de-correlation distance, which is set to 20 m. d is the distance that a mobile user has moved since the last calculation of shadowing. The lognormal shadowing with zero mean and a standard deviation of 8 dB is considered. S is the shadowing value represented in dB and is updated with the last calculated shadowing value S ∗ . The shadowing fading is updated every HSDPA transmit time interval (TTI). The fast fading is modeled by a Jake’s spectrum model [19] with one path and is updated every TTI. The carrier frequency is set to 2 GHz.

9

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

TABLE II M ODULATION AND C ODING S CHEMES IN S IMULATION MCS

Modulation

Peak Data

Transmission

Index

Coding Rate

Rate(kb/s/code)

Capability(bit/TTI)

1

QPSK 1/2

240

480 720

2

QPSK 3/4

360

3

16QAM 1/2

480

960

4

16QAM 3/4

720

1440

5

64QAM 3/4

1080

2160

D. HSDPA Application Configurations Adaptive modulation and coding (AMC) is introduced for channel adaptation. The selecting of modulation and coding scheme (MCS) is based on user’s channel condition and its traffic bit error rate requirement. Five MCSs are provided and shown in Table II. A hybrid adaptive repeat request (HARQ) mechanism of Chase combing [20] is applied to deal with transmission failure. Packets are segmented into transport blocks in transmission. Erroneous transport blocks can be transmitted as much as five times. The acknowledge delay is set to 5 ms. The high speed downlink shared transport channel (HS-DSCH) can operate on up to 15 parallel channels with spreading factor of 16. Downlink transmitting power is evenly divided among 15 HS-DSCH channels. No power control is applied. V. N UMERICAL R ESULTS AND D ISCUSSION In the simulation, 5% outage capacity in terms of PDR is defined as the metric of system capacity. We conclude that 5% traffic outage capacity has been reached when short term PDR exceeds traffic PDR limit 5% of the time. The short term PDR for voice session is collected every 500 packets and that for video session is every 5000 packets. It is specified that the 5% outage capacity has been approached when either voice or video traffic hits its 5% traffic outage capacity bound. Figure 1 to figure 3 present outage capacities of Exp, MLWDF and MExp. When M:N=1:1, M:N=1:2 and M:N=2:1, the maximum outage capacities of {48/48, 66/66, 70/70}, {28/56, 37/74, 39/78} and {74/37, 106/53, 116/58} voice/video sessions can be achieved without exceeding 0.01/0.001 PDR 5% of the time for Exp, MLWDF and MExp respectively. On the bounds of 5% outage capacities, the average packet delay and system throughput for the three algorithms are illustrated in Fig.4 to 6. As is shown that the average system throughput of {7.2Mbps, 9.8Mbps, 10.4Mbps} for M:N=1:1, {8.2Mbps, 10.9Mbps, 11.4Mbps} for M:N=1:2 and {5.7Mbps, 8.1Mbps, 8.9Mbps} for M:N=2:1 can be achieved by Exp, MLWDF and MExp correspondingly. The performance differences in average packet delay are within 26.7 ms in three kinds of traffic load settings. The scheduling fairness indices presented in Section II and III can give some basic explanation to these numerical results. As indicated by comparison of (18), (20) and (25), for Exp, there are {0.29, 0.41}, {0.18, 0.49} and {0.41, 0.26} fairness indices less than those of MLWDF and MExp when M:N=1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 respectively. In other words, Exp is the weakest in providing fair scheduling opportunities for voice and video sessions. Since unfair scheduling will lead to inappropriate resource allocation between component traffic sessions, Exp accommodates the fewest traffic sessions and sees the lowest system outage capacities and throughput. Whereas, with the increased {0.29, 0.18, 0.41} fairness index, MLWDF obtains {18/18, 9/18, 32/16} voice/video sessions outage capacity and {2.6Mbps, 2.7Mbps, 2.4Mbps} throughput gains over Exp for M:N=1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 respectively. Furthermore, on account of the enhanced fairness of {0.41, 0.49, 0.26}, MExp outperforms Exp with {22/22, 11/22, 42/21} more voice/video session capacity and {3.2Mbps, 3.2Mbps, 3.2Mbps} higher throughput for M:N=1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 correspondingly. And, it attains {4/4, 10/5} voice/video sessions and {0.6Mbps, 0.8Mbps} throughput gains over the MLWDF when

10

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

Exp voice Exp video MLWDF voice MLWDF video MExp voice MExp video

100

PDR Outage Probability (%)

80

60

40

20

0

45/45

48/48

51/51

54/54

62/62

64/64

66/66

68/68

70/70

72/72

Voice/Video Session Number

Fig. 1.

Outage capacity of Exp, MLWDF and MExp for M:N=1:1.

Exp voice Exp video MLWDF voice MLWDF video MExp voice MExp video

100 90

PDR Outage Probability (%)

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 -10 26/52

28/56

30/60

37/74

38/76

39/78

40/80

Voice/Video Session Number

Fig. 2.

Outage capacity of Exp, MLWDF and MExp for M:N=1:2.

Exp voice Exp video MLWDF voice MLWDF video MExp voice MExp video

100 90

PDR Outage Probability (%)

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 -10 --

72/36

78/39

84/42

102/51

108/54

114/57

Voice/Video Session Number

Fig. 3.

Outage capacity of Exp, MLWDF and MExp for M:N=2:1.

120/60

--

11

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics. 80 11000

voice packet delay video packet delay system throughput

70

MExp

Exp

50

9000

40 8000 30 7000 20

System Throughput (kbps)

Average Packet Delay (ms)

10000

MLWDF

60

6000

10

5000

0 46 /46

48 /48

50 /50

52 /52

54 /54

56 /56

58 /58

60 /60

62 /62

64 /64

66 /66

68 /68

70 /70

72 /72

Voice/Video Session Number

Fig. 4.

Packet delay and system throughput for Exp, MLWDF and MExp as M:N=1:1.

M:N={1:1, 1:2} due to the increment of {0.12, 0.31} fairness index. However, MExp still outperforms MLWDF in outage capability 10/5 voice/video sessions and in system throughput 0.8Mbps, even though MLWDF can obtain 0.15 more scheduling fairness index than MExp when M:N=2:1. We can find the explanation from the preceding analysis in Section III. Since MLWDF cannot distinguish urgent packets from ordinary ones, its scheduling opportunity is not real-time oriented. So, packets trend to run out of time without any awareness, which results in more obsolete packets in MLWDF scheduler. In contrast, MExp can allocate its scheduling opportunity by knowing whether a packet is emergent or not. Thus, obsolete packets can be well suppressed and packet drop rate can be effectively diminished. Consequently, the timely scheduling capability of MExp contributes to improvement in system outage capacity and throughput. Whereas, the weak real-time scheduling capability of MLWDF becomes one bottleneck of system performance. This phenomenon indicates that the real-time scheduling capability of a scheduling algorithm plays a significant role in scheduling efficiency for real-time multimedia applications. Examining Fig.1 to 3, we can find that the PDR outage probability curves of video sessions are always going above those of voice sessions for MLWDF and Exp. However, MExp is in the opposite situations. This can be explained by studying the allocated scheduling opportunities of (16) (19) and (24). Compared with the ideal scheduling target (15), MLWDF and Exp provide {0.39, 0.59}, {0.48, 0.60} and {0.25, 0.58} less scheduling opportunities for video sessions and the corresponding amount more scheduling opportunities for voice sessions when M:N=1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 respectively. So, video sessions are short of services and always reaching 5% traffic outage capacity bound ahead of voice sessions in MLWDF and Exp. However, MExp can make up the shortage of scheduling opportunity allocated to video sessions. Since MExp serves video sessions {0.17, 0.3, 0.27} more scheduling opportunities than voice sessions as indicated by comparison of (24) and (15), the outage probability curves for voice sessions run slightly higher than those for video sessions. Note that, in Fig.1 to 3, the outage probability curves of MExp for two kinds of traffic sessions overlap almost on each other in the vicinity of (even far from) system capacity bounds, which are different from the separated ones of MLWDF and Exp. These adjacently running curves prove that MExp scheduler can strike a better balance between the two classes of traffic sessions in scheduling opportunity and radio resource allocation than the other two algorithms. So, near optimal scheduling fairness can be achieved by MExp. VI. C ONCLUSION This paper investigated scheduling fairness for real-time multimedia application over wireless shared channel. The work began with studying, in a proposed probability, statistics and random processes method,

12

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics. 80

MExp voice packet delay video packet delay system throughput

70

12000

MLWDF

11000

10000

Exp

50

9000 40 8000 30 7000

20

System Throughput (kbps)

Average Packet Delay (ms)

60

6000

10

5000

0 27 /54

28 /56

29 /58

30 /60

31 /62

32 /64

33 /66

34 /68

35 /70

36 /72

37 /74

38 /76

39 /78

40 /80

Voice/Video Session Number

Fig. 5.

Packet delay and system throughput for Exp, MLWDF and MExp as M:N=1:2. 10000

80

voice packet delay video packet delay system throughput

70

MExp

9000

MLWDF 50

8000

40

Exp 7000

30

20

System Throughput (kbps)

Average Packet Delay (ms)

60

6000 10

5000

0 72 /36

76 /38

80 /40

84 /42

88 /44

92 /46

96 /48

100 /50

104 /52

108 /54

112 /56

116 /58

120 /60

Voice/Video Session Number

Fig. 6.

Packet delay and system throughput for Exp, MLWDF and MExp as M:N=2:1.

the scheduling properties of two classical scheduling algorithms MLWDF and Exp. Theoretical study shows that the two algorithms provide limited scheduling fairness among different traffic sessions in typical voice and video applications. Therefore, we put forward the MExp algorithm to enhance scheduling fairness. These algorithms’ system level performances in terms of outage capacity and throughput are evaluated in HSDPA based simulation environment. Analytical and numerical results show that Exp obtains the worst scheduling fairness, and gets the lowest outage capacity and system throughput performances in cases of M:N=1:1, 1:2 and 2:1. For M:N=1:1 and 1:2, MExp achieves the highest scheduling fairness, outage capacity and throughput. In case of M:N=2:1, although MExp obtains a lower scheduling fairness index than MLWDF, it still outperforms the latter in outage capacity and system throughput. It is the timely scheduling capability of MExp that contributes to improvement of its system performance. This claims the significance of real-time scheduling capability for a scheduling algorithm applied in real-time multimedia applications. In summary, the proposed MExp algorithm outperforms the two classical ones in scheduling fairness, outage capacity and system throughput in typical voice and video applications, which verifies the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical analysis method for scheduling fairness study and scheduling algorithm design.

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

13

ACKNOWLEDGMENT The authors would like to thank Prof. Dongmei Zhao at McMaster University and Prof. Xinsheng Zhao of SouthEast University for their valuable comments and discussions. R EFERENCES [1] 3GPP TS23 107, v5.8.0, ”Quality of service concept and architecture”, March 2003. [2] Zahariadis T. and Doshi, B., ”Applications and services for the B3G/4G era”, Wireless Communications, IEEE, Vol. 11, Issue: 5, pp.3 - 5, Oct. 2004. [3] 3GPP Technical Report 25.848, version 4.0.0, ”Physical layer aspects of UTRA High Speed Downlink Packet Access”, March 2001. [4] Bender P., Black P., Grob M., Padovani R., Sindhushyana N. and Viterbi S., ”CDMA/HDR: a bandwidth efficient high speed wireless data service for nomadic users”, Communications Magazine, IEEE, Vol. 38, Issue: 7, pp. 70 - 77, July 2000. [5] Huei-Wen Ferng, Chung-Fan Lee, Jeng-Ji Huang and Ge-Ming Chiu, ”Designing a fair scheduling mechanism for IEEE 802.11 wireless LANs”, Communications Letters, IEEE, vol. 9, Issue 4, pp.301 - 303, April 2005 [6] Liang Xu, Xuemin Shen and Mark J.W., ”Dynamic fair scheduling with QoS constraints in multimedia wideband CDMA cellular networks”, Wireless Communications, IEEE Transactions on, Vol. 3, Issue 1, pp.60 - 73, Jan. 2004 [7] D.Bertsekas and R.Gallager, Data Networks. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1992. [8] F. Kelly, A. Maulloo, and D. Tan, ”Charging and rate control for elastic traffic”, European Transactions on Telecommunications, vol. 8, pp.33-37, 1997. [9] R. Jain, DM Chiu and W. Hawe, ”A quantitative measure of fairness and discrimination for resource allocation in shared systems”, TechReport DEC-TR-301, September 1984. Available: http://www.cse.wustl.edu/ jain/papers/ftp/fairness.pdf [10] M.Andrews, K.Kumaran, K.Ramanan, A. Stolyar, R. Vijayakumar and P. Whiting, ”CDMA data QoS scheduling on the forward link with variable channel conditions”, Bell Laboratories Technical Report. April 2000. [11] Andrews M., Kumaran K., Ramanan K., Stolyar A., Whiting P. and Vijayakumar R., ”Providing quality of service over a shared wireless link”,Communications Magazine, IEEE, Vol. 39, Issue: 2, pp.150 - 154, Feb. 2001. [12] Sanjay Shakkottai and Alexander L. Stolyar, ”Scheduling for Multiple Flows Sharing a Time-Varying Channel- The Exponential Rule”, Bell Laboratories Technical Report. Dec. 2000. [13] Sanjay Shakkottai and Alexander L. Stolyar, ”Scheduling algorithms for a mixture of real-time and non-real-time data in HDR”, Bell Laboratories Technical Report, Oct. 2000. [14] Hwei P. Hsu, Schaum’s outline of theory and problems of probability, random variables, and random processes. New York, NY, USA: McGraw-Hill Inc., 1997. [15] A. Sampath and J. M. Holtzman, ”Access control of data in integrated voice/data CDMA systems: benefits and tradeoffs,” IEEE J. Select. Areas Commun., Vol. 15, Issue 8, pp.1511 - 1526, Oct. 1997. [16] 1xEV-DV Evaluation Methodology-Addendum (V6), WG5 Evaluation AHG, July 25, 2001. [17] ETSI Technical Report 101 112, ”Selection procedures for the choice of radio transmission technologies of the UMTS”, UMTS TR 30.03, V3.2.0, April 1998. [18] Recommendation ITU-R M.1225, ”Guideline for evolution of radio transmission technologies for IMT-2000”. [19] W. C. Jakes, Microwave Mobile Communications. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 1994. [20] D. Chase, ”Code combing-a maximum-likelihood decoding approach for combing an arbitrary number of noisy packets,” IEEE Trans. Commun., vol.33, Issue 5, pp.385 - 393, May 1985.

Binyang Xu received the M.S. degree in Signal and Information Processing from University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, P.R.C., in 2003 and B.S. degree in Applied Electronic Technology from Chengdu University of Technology (formerly Chengdu Institute of Technology) in 1998 respectively. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. degree at the School of Communication and Information Engineering and serves as research assistant in the National Key Lab of Communication, UESTC. His research interests include radio resources management/optimization, QoS provisioning, multimedia applications in wireless/mobile networks.

Preliminary Edition for the Chinese Journal of Electronics.

14

Shaoqian Li received the B.S.E.E. degree from University of Electronic Science and Technology of Xi’an, China, in 1982 and the M.S.E.E. degree from University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, in 1984 respectively. Since July 1984, he has been a faculty member with the Institute of Communication and Information Engineering, UESTC, China, where he is a professor, since 1997, and Ph.D. Supervisor, since 2000. He is also the director of National Key Lab of Communication in UESTC and a member of Telecommunication Subject with National High Technology RD Program of China (863 Program). His main research interests include mobile communications systems (3G, Beyond 3G), wireless communication (CDMA, OFDM, MIMO and etc.), integrated circuit in communication systems and radio/spatial resource management.

Heping Pu received his B.S degree in Foundation Mathematics from Sichuan University, Chegndu, China, in1988. Now, he is an associate professor and chief teacher in the college of applied mathematics at University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China. His research interests include combination mathematics and differential dynamic system.

Scheduling Fairness of Real-Time Scheduling ...

MExp, outage capacity, quality of service (QoS), scheduling fairness, ... Wireless industry has been making its way to the field of real-time multimedia applications. ... data applications over both wire-line and wireless channels, multiplexing ...

271KB Sizes 2 Downloads 57 Views

Recommend Documents

Insertion Scheduling: An Alternative to List Scheduling ...
constraints between the tasks, build a schedule which satisfies the precedence and the ... reservation vector, for the conditional stores of the DEC Alpha 21064.

FCFS Scheduling
To schedule snapshot of processes queued according to FCFS (First Come First Serve) scheduling. Algorithm. 1. Define an array of structure process with members pid, btime, wtime & ttime. 2. Get length of the ready queue, i.e., number of process (say

planning and scheduling
ment of PDDL (Planning Domain De nition Language), a language for ... Satisfaction (CSP) or Constraint Programming. The dis- ..... cision Procedure for AR.

planning and scheduling
from those arising in more realistic application domains. Real-sized planning domains are ... development of problems with increasingly complex fea- tures. Functional to the ..... to the problem of plan life-cycle management. REFERENCES.

Re Scheduling of Screening and Evaluation of Head Teacher's ...
Re Scheduling of Screening and Evaluation of Head Teacher's Position.pdf. Re Scheduling of Screening and Evaluation of Head Teacher's Position.pdf. Open.

Block Scheduling at Kingswood.pdf
There was a problem previewing this document. Retrying... Download. Connect more apps... Try one of the apps below to open or edit this item.

[EBOOK] Maintenance Planning and Scheduling ...
PDF Download Maintenance Planning And Scheduling Handbook Full Online, ... Planning And Scheduling Handbook pdf ebook, Download Best Book .... used to present documents in a manner independent of application software, ... You can download textbooks a

[PDF] Maintenance Planning and Scheduling ...
... the software International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications .... additions to the business case for planning and scheduling, new case ... and a new appendix illustrating how to easily conduct an in-house productivity study.

Download Construction Planning and Scheduling
designed for construction management, planning and scheduling. ... click the downloaded file to install the software Pink Pigs in Mud English and ... this window and PRESS F5 to view this edition Find the latest business news on Wall ... housing mark

Google Calendar Basics Training Doc, Scheduling & Settings ...
Google Calendar Basics Training Doc, Scheduling & Settings - Google Drive.pdf. Google Calendar Basics Training Doc, Scheduling & Settings - Google Drive.

Web-scale Job Scheduling - CS - Huji
other issues in Web cluster management that, while not the focus of this paper, ... as the sum value in the database must be accurate to within the past few ..... some problems and challenges, as well as describing some working novel solutions.