( Reaffirmed 1997 )

.

IS : 4651( Parr IHZ) - 1974

hdiaB Standard CODE OF PRACTICE FQR PLANNING AND DESIGN OF PORTS AND HARBOURS PART Ii-l (

LOADING

First Revision )

Ports and Harbours Sectional

Representing

Chairman B~c

Committee, BDC 66

Ministry of Shipping & Transport, New Delhi

0. P. NARULA

Members Mormugao Port Trust, Mormugao SHRI M. BALXUBRAMAX~ Madras Port Trust, Madras SHRI U. R. BALASUBRAMANIAM SHRI V. V. SESHADR~( Alternate ) Pre-investment Survey~of Fishing Harbour, Bangalore SHRI N. P. BHAKTA SHRI H. V. ~MASWAMY ( Alternate ) Hydraulic Study Department ( Ports Commissioners, DR S. K. BHATTACHARJEE Calcutta ) DR S. K. NAG (Alternate ) Public Works Department, Government of Gujarat SHRI R. K. BUDHBHA?TI SHRI B. I’. KC’KADIA ( Aftemofc j Calcutta Port Commissioners, Calcutta SW I. G. CHACXO SHRI R. C. GHOSH (Alternate ) Rodio Foundation Engineering; and Hazarat & Co, Sa A. H. DIYANJI Bombay SHRI A. N. JANGLE (AI&mate ) Consulting Engineering Services India Pvt Ltd, New S~nr K. K. FRAMJI Delhi SHRI S. GHOSTS(Alternate ) Bombay Port Trust, Bombav SHRI S. R. GAITONDE Braithwaite Bum & Jessop Construction Ltd, Calcutta SHRI A. GHOSHAL Centr&Tez & Power Commission ( CWPRS ), SHR1 c. V. GOLE DR A. S. TARAPORE (Alternate) Indian Navy ( Ministry of Defence ) REAR-ADU V. M. KATDARE LT-COL P. S. SETHEE ( Alternate ) ( Continued on page 2 )

@ Cwyriahr INDI.AN

STANDARDS

1980

INSTITUTION

This publication is protected under the Indian Copyright Act (XIV of 1957 ) and reproduction in whole or in part by any means except with written permission of the publisher shall be deemed to be an infringement of copyright under the said Act.

IS : 4651( Part III ) 9’1974

[email protected]

Md.PJ Calcu$u~~

SHRI B. L. MZTAL CAPT P. N. BATM ( Aftmate ) T. K. D. MUNSI SHRI H. S. CHEEMA( Altemafe ) BRIO P. H. NARURKAR

SW

cOmmissioncrs

( Marine Department ),

Engineers India Limited, New Delhi Engi;c&x-&ief’s

Branch,

Army

Headquarters,

LT-COL OMBIR SINGA ( Al&mute ) School of Planning, Ahmedabad Hasrruxc~ P. OZA Hindustan Construction Co Ltd, Bombay SHRI B. K. PANTHAD’ Visakhapatnam Port Trust, Visakhapatnam SHRI G. S. RAMLW SHRI H. R. LAXXINARAYAN( Alternate ) Howe ( India ) Pvt Ltd, New Delhi SHRI S. R. ROESSLER SHRI H. NANDI (Al&mate ) Director General, IS1 ( &-oficio Member ) SHRI D. AWXA SD~H~ _~ Dirccto; ( Civ Engg )

Sm

SHRIG.RAMAN Deputy Director ( Civ Engg ), IS1

IS : 4651 ( Part

III ) - 1974

Indian Standard CODE OF PRACTICE FOR PLANNING AND DESIGN OF PORTS AND HARBOURS PART (

ill

LOADING

First Revision ) 0.

FOREWORD

0.1 This Indian Standard ( Part III ) ( First Revision) was~adopted by the Indian Standards Institution on 15 March 1974, after the draft finalized by the Ports and Harbours Sectional Committee had been approved by the Civil Engineering Division Council. 0.2 A great need has ~been felt for formulating standard recommendations relating to various aspects of waterfront structures. This standard is one of a series of Indian Standards proposed to be formulated on this subject., IS: 465 1 ( Part I )-1974* relates to site investigation. This part ( Part III ) deals with loading. This standard was published in 1969. In first revision, besides other changes, details on ships characteristics and the methods for determining wave forces have been added. 0.3 In the formulation of this standard due weightage has been given to international co-ordination among the standards and practices prevailing in different countries in addition to relating it to the practices in the field in this country. e 0.4 For the purpose of deciding whether a particular requirement of this standard is complied with, the final value, observed or calculated, expressing the result of a test, shall be rounded off in accordance with IS : 2;1960t. The number of significant places retained in the rounded off value should be the same as that of the specified value in this standard. 1. SCOPE 1.1 This standard ( Part III ) deals with the loading on waterfront structures. It covers vertical live loads, horizontal forces due to berthing, bollard pulls, wave forces, currents and winds; reference is given to earthquake forces. *Code of practice for planning and design of investigation (&St revision). tRuies for rounding oiT numerical values ( mired).

3

ports and harbours:

Part I Site

IS : 4651.x Part III ) - 1974 2. DEFINITIONS

OF SHIP

TONNAGES

2.1 Gross

Registered Tonnage - Usually designated as GRT, is broadly the capacity in cubic feet of the spaces within the hull, and of the enclosed spaces above the deck available for cargo, stores, passengers and crew, with certain exceptions, divided by 100.

Thus 100 cubic feet of capacity is equivalent to 1 gross ton. Tonnage - Usually designated as NRT, is derived from the gross tonnage by deducting spaces used for the accommodation of the master, officers, crew, navigation, propelling machinery and fuel.

2.2 Net Registered

2.3 Dead Weight Tonnage - Usually designated as DWT, is the weight in tons ( of 2 240 lb ) of cargo, stores, fuel, passengers and crew carried by the ship when loaded to her maximum summer load line. 2.4 Displacement Tonnage - Is the actual weight of the vessel, or the weight of water she displaces when afloat and may be either ’ loaded ’ or ‘light ‘. Displacement, loaded, is the weight, in long tons, of the ship and its contents when fully loaded with cargo, to the plimsoll mark or load line. Displacement, light, is the weight, in long tons, of the ship without cargo, fuel and stores. 3. 3HI.P

cHARAcTERIsTIcS

3.1 Relationship

between the various tonnages are generally as follows:

Type of Ship

Gross

‘&g&red Tonnage ( GRT )

(2) Large sea going vessels Small sea going vessels Freighters Large taukers Large combined carriers Large passenger ships Passenger ships Inland water way craft Other types of ships

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

JVet Registered Tonnage

( NRT)

Dead Weight

(%!!)

Dis&cement Tonnage

(3)

(4)

0.6

-

-

0.4

-

-

-

1.5 2

2 see 3.13

-

I.8 -

1.9

1 1.2

-

-

0.8 -

(5)

1

4

c

IS : 4651( Part III ) - 1974 3.1.1 For bulk carriers,

relationship

between

GRT

and DWT

is generally

as follows: DWT 3.1.2 follows:

For tankers, 25 000

DWT DT/DWT

1.32

=

relationships

1.649 GRT

+

between

1 462

DWT

and DT

are generally

as

50 000

80 000

100 000

125 000

225 000 and above

1.26

1.25

1.20

1.17

1.15

3.2 Ship Dimensions -For preliminary design purposes the ship For detailed design ship dimensions given in ilppendix -4 may be used. dimensions appropriate to the type of service required may be obtained from a Register of Shipping, such as Lloyds Register of Shipping. 4. DEAD

LOADS

4.1 All dead loads of and on structures should be assessed and included 5. LIVE

relating in the design.

to docks

and harbours

LOADS

5.1 Vertical

Live Loads

5.1.1 Surcharges due to stored and stacked material, such as general cargo, bulk cargo, containers and loads from vehicular traffic of all kinds, including trucks, trailers, railway, cranes, containers handling equipment and construction plant constitute vertical live loads. 5.1.2 Truck Loading and Unifrm Loading - The berths shall be generally designed for the truck loading and uniform loading as given in Table 1. TABLE FUNCTION

1 TRUCK

OF~BERTH

LOADING

AND

TRUCK LOADING ( IRC CLASS)

(2)

(1) Passenger berth Bulk unloading and loading berth Container berth Cargo berth Heavy cargo berth Small boat berth Fishing berth

UNIFORM

B A A or AA or 70 R A or AA or 70 R A or AA or 70 R B B

LOADING UNIFORMVERTICAL LIVE LOADINGT/m* (3) 1-o 1 to l-5 3 to 5 2.5 to 3.5 5 or more 0.5 1-o

for NOTE -The relevant Indian Road Congress ( IRC ) codes may be referred axle load. The spacing of the loads may be eharwd to suit individual design requirements.

5

IS : 4651( Part III ) - 1974 loads from crane wheels and other 5.1.3 Crane Loads - Concentrated specialized mechanical handling equipment should be considered. An impact of 25 percent shall be added to wheel loads in the normal design of deckhand stringers, 15 percent where two or more cranes act together, and 15 percent in the design of pile caps and secondary framing members. 5.1.4 Railway Loads - Concentrated wheel loads due to locomotive wheels and wagon wheels in accordance with the specification of the Indian Railways for the type of gauge and service at the locality in question. 5.1.5 For impact due to trucks and railways one-third factors specified in the relevant codes may be adopted.

of the impact

5.1.6 Special Loads - Special loads like pipeline loads or conveyor loads or exceptional loads, such as surcharge due to ore stacks, transfer towers, heavy machinery or any other type of heavy lifts should be individually considered. 5.1.7 When the live loads act on the fill behind the structure, such as in a sheet pile wharf so that the loads are transmitted to the structure through increased earth pressure the retaining structure may be designed for uniformally distributed equivalent surcharge of half the value given in co1 3 of Table 1. In cases where higher load intensity is expected the actual value of surcharge may be taken.

5.1.8 If truck cranes are to be used in cargo handling, or if the backfill in a retaining structure is proposed to be placed with earth moving equipment of the crawler type, the uppermost portion of the waterfront structures, including the upper anchorage system should be designed according to the following loadings, whichever of the two is more unfavourable: a) Live load of 6.0 tonnes per square metre coping inboard for a 1.50-m width.

from

back

edge of the

b) Live load of 4.0 tonnes per square metre from the back edge of the coping inboard for a 3.5-m width. 5.2

Berthing Load

5.2.1 Berthing Energy-When an approaching vessel strikes a berth a horizontal force acts on the berth. The magnitude of this force depends on the kinetic energy that can be absorbed by the fendering system. The reaction force for which the berth is to be designed can be obtained and deflection-reaction diagrams of the fendering system chosen. These diagrams are obtainable from fender manufacturers. The kinetic energy, E, imparted to a fendering system, by a vessel moving with velocity V m/s is &en by:

-

x 6

c,

x

c, x c,

XS: 4651( Part

III ) - 1974

where .M;b L= displacement

tonnage

V = velocity of vessel 5.2.1.1 ); g

= acceleration

in

( DT ) of the vessel, in tonnes; m/s,

due to gravity

Gn = mass coefficient

normal

= eccentricity

coefficient

C,

= softness coefficient

berth

( see

in m/G;

( see 5.2.1.2

C,

to the

);

(set 5.2.1.3

( see 5.2.1.4

); and

).

NOTE -Some authorities believe that it is difficult to establish consistent mathematical relationship between approach velocity of a vessel and the energy of impact because of many unknown and uncontrollable factors. A statistical approach based on recorded measurement of approach velocities and berthing energy at some British Petroleum Company tanker terminals provides a sound basis for design criteria than mathematical calculations based on velocity. According to Dent and Saurin* the folio-wring criteria for berthing energy should be considered adequate: a) For off-shore terminals with average exposure condition

1) Fender capacity at each end of the jetty 2.30 tonne-mctre

per 1000 DWT of design ship at yield stress in the fenders 1.52 tonne-mctrc per 1 000 DWT as a normal maximum allied to approximately working stress in the fenders.

2) Fender reaction:

A fender reaction of not more than 500 tonnes relative to 2.30 tonne-metre energy criteria. A fender rc action of the order of 300 tonne for the 1.52 tonne-mctre energy criteria.

thrust in (2) above to be distributed over 3) Distribution of thrust on ship -The a length.of hull not less than the spacing between the transverse frames of the dcagnship. 4) For protected harbour condition and for terminals where vessels berth in ballast, the design criteria to be adopted for the design of berthing structure is 62.5 percent of the vessels specified under (1) and (2).

-5.2.1.1 Approach velocities - Normal components of approach velocities of berthing vessels are recommended to be taken as given in Table 2. Berthing conditions will depend on alignment of the berth currents, availability of tugs, physical layout of the harbour, waves at time of berthing.

relative to winds and

Mass coefficient - When a vessel approaches a berth and is suddenly checked, the force of impact which the vessel imparts comprises of the weight of the vessel and an effect from the water moving along with the moviyg vessel. Such an effect, expressed in terms of weight of water moving with the vessel, is called the additional weight 5.2.1.2 as its motion

*Tanker

Terminals

Berthing

Structures

by G. E. Dent & B. F. Saurin.

7

IS : 4651 ( Part III ) - 1974 TABLE 2 NORMAL VELOCITIES OF VESSELS (Clause5.2.1.1 ) Srre CONDITION E.

BERTHINQVELOCIN NORMAL BERTHIN~/~ h

BERTHING CONDITION

‘up to

(2)

(1)

(3)

Up to

TO \

5 000 DT

up to 10 000 DT

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

l%?O

More thad 100000 DT

i)

Strong wind and swells

Difficult

075

O-55

O-40

0.20

ii)

Strong wind and swells

Favourable

o-60

0.45

0.30

O-20

iii)

M$;late

Moderate

0.45

0.35

0.20

O-15

iv)

Sheltered

Difficult

0.25

0.20

O-15

0.10

v)

Sheltered

Favourable

0.20

0.15

O-10

0.10

wind and

( W, ) of the vessel or the hydrodynamic weight of the vessel. Thus the effective weight in berthing is-the sum of displacement tonnage of a vessel and its additional weight, which is known as virtual weight ( WV ) of a vessel. a) The mass coefficient

C,,, should be calculated

c, =

1+

as follows:

T

D = draught of the vessel in m, B = beam of the vessel in m. b)

Alternative to (a) in case of a vessel which has a length much greater than its beam or draught generally for vessels with displacement tonnage greater than 20 000 the additional weight may be approximated to the weight of a cylindrical column of water of height equal to the length of vessel and diameter equal to the draught of vessel, then c m--l+

x/4 D= Lw WD

8

IS : 4651( Part III )-- 1974 where D = draught of the vessel in m, L = length of the vessel in m, w = unit weight of water ( 1.03 tonnes/m2 -for sea water ), and WD== displacement tonnage of the vessel in tonnes. Virtual weight-The

NOTE follows:

virtual w,

weight of the vessel ehould be calculated

as

= WD X cm

where W, = virtual weight -of the vessil in tonnes, and WD = displacement tonnage of the vessel in tonnes.

5.2.13 Eccentricity coejh’ent - A vessel generally approaches a berth at an angle, denoted by 0 and touches it at a point either near the bow or stern of the vessel. In such eccentric cases the vessel is imparted a rotational force at the moment of contact, and the kinetic energy of the vessel is partially expended in its rotational motion. _ a) The eccentricity coefficient ( C, ) may then be derived as follows: c

~ = 1 + ( 1/f )” Sin* 0 1 + ( l/r )”

where 1 = distance from the centre of gravity of the vessel to the point of contact projected along the water line of the berth in m, and r = radius of gyration of rotational radius on the plane of the vessel from its centre of gravity in m ( P-CG in Fig. 1 ). Table 3 gives eccentricity coefficient values of l/r.

FIG. 1

b)

VESSELAPPROACHINGBERTH AT AN ANGLE

The approach angle B unless otherwise known with accuracy should be taken as IO”. For smaller vessels approaching wharf structures, the approach angle should be taken as 20”. 9

IS : 4651( Part III ) - 1974 c) The rotational radius of a vessel may be approximated to L/4 and, in normal case, the point of contact of the berthing vessel with the structure is at a point about L/4 from the bow or stern Also, if of the vessel, which is known as a quarter point contact. the approach angle 0 is nearly O”, then For large tankers, Then

r == 0.2 L

C, = 0.4. TABLE 3

VALUES OF ECCENTRICITY

COEFFICIEZW

[Clause 5.2.1.3 (a) ] I/r

ANKLE -h10"

r-----0" 0’50 0.39

1 1.25

0.51 0.41

/j -27 0.56 046

5.2.1.4 Softness coeficient - This softness coefficient ( C, ) indicates the relation between the rigidity of the vessel and ,that of the fender, and hence also that between the energy absorbed by the vessel and bv the Since the ship is relatively rigid compared with the usually yieldfender. ing fendering systems, a value of 0.9 is generally applied for this factor, or 0.95 if higher safety margin is thought desirable.

5.2.2

High

energy absorption is required during the mooring of very However, the reaction force against the side of large vessels not exceed 40 tonnes/m’.

large vessels.

should

5.2.2.1 Deflection-reaction diagram should give the berthing energy the fender system can absorb. A fender system includes fenders and The reaction force for the fenders and the structhe berthing structure. tures will be the same.

which

5.2.3 Berthing load and, therefore, the energy of impact is to be considered for pier, dolphin and the like, with no backfill. In the case of continuous structures with backfill thrs may not form a governing criterion for design, because of the enormous passive pressure likely to be mobilized. However, short lengths of gravity type, sheet pile type or relieving platform type berths may have to be checked for impact of vessels. 5.3

Mooring

Loads

5.3.1 The mooring loads are the lateral loads caused by the mooring lines when they pull the ship into or along the dock or hold it against the forces of wind or current. 5.3.2

The maximum mooring loads are due to the wind forces on exposed side of the ship in light condition:

area on the broad

F=C,,,A, 10

P

IS : 4651( Part III ) - 1974 where

F = force due to wind in kg, C,,, = shape

factor

=

1.3 to 1.6,

A w = windage area in mz ( see 5.3.2.1), and P = wind pressure in kg/m2 to be taken in accordance IS : 8751964*. 5.3.2.1

The windage

area ( A,) can be estimated A, = 1.175 L, ( DAf - DL )

with

as follows:

where

L 9 = -length between perpendicular B.u DL

in m,

= mould depth in m, and =

average

light draft in m.

5.3.3 When the ships are berthed on both sides of a pier, the total wind force acting on the pier, should be increased by 50 percent to allow for wind against the second ship. 5.3.4 The appropriate load on the bollard shall then be calculated, which depends upon the layout of harbour, and position of bow line, stern line, spring line and breasting lines; for guidance the bollard pulls independent of the number of laid-on hawsers, may be taken as given in Table 4 since the hawsers are not fully stressed simultaneously. TABLE

4

BOLLARD

PULLS

( Clauses 5.3.4 and 6.1 ) DLSPLACZEMEN~ ( Tons )

LINE PULL (To=) (2)

(1)

10 30 60 80 100 150

2000 10 000 20 000 50 000 100 000 200 000 Greater than 200 000

200

NATE 1 - For ships of displacement tonnage 50 000 and over the value of line pulls given above should be increased by 25 percent at quays and berths where there is a strong current. NOTE 2 -Main bollards at the ends of individual large vessel berths at river structures should be designed for a line pull ~of 250 tons for ships up to 100 000 tons displacement and for double the vaiues given above for larger ships. *Code of practice for structural safety of buildings: Loading standards (rcvhd).

11

I!S:4651(PartIII)-1974 5.3.5 The line pull angle to the longitudinal to act horizontally.

will be towards the water and may make any direction of the structure and is usually assumed

5.3.6 In the design calculations of the bollard itself and its connections to the structure, line pull up to 30” and above the horizontal should be considered. 5.3.7 Pressure on the vessel as well as the structure due to the current should be taken into account, especially with a strong current and where Determinathe berth alignment deviates from the direction of the current. tion of these forces is dealt with in 5.6. 5.4

Differential

Water

Pressure

5.4.1 In the case of waterfront structures with backfill, th;e pressure caused by difference in water levels at the fillside and the waterside has to The magnitude of this hydrostatic presbe taken into account in design. sure is influenced by the tidal range, free water fluctuations, the ground water influx, the permeability of the foundation soil and the structure as well as the efficiency of available backfill drainage. 5.4.2 In the case of good and poor drainage conditions of the backfill be calculated on the guidelines given the differential water pressure ma is ‘ assumed LLW ‘_ in Fig. 2. The level between M IZWS and LLW

ElEVAllON OF FLAP VALVE BOllOt.4~

v MHW

2A

Poor

Drainage

Condition

2B

Good

MHW

= Mean high water

MLW

= Mean low water

Drainage

Condition

ML WS = Mcamlow water springs LL W - Lowest low water GW = Ground water FIG.

2

GUIDE FOR CALCULATINGDIFFERENTIALWATER PRESSURE

5.5 Earthquake Forces - In areas susceptible to seismic disturbance, horizontal force equal to a fraction of the acceleration of gravity times the weight afiplied as its centre of' gravity should be taken. The fraction will 12

IS : 4651(

Part III ) - 1974

depend upon the likely seismic intensity of the area, and shall be taken in The weight to be used is the total dead accordance with IS : 1893-1970*. load plus one-halfof the live load. 5.6~ Forces due to Current - Pressure due to current will be applied to the area of the vessel below the water line when fully loaded. It is approximately equal to w us/Z g per square metre of area, where v is the velocity in m/s and w is the unit weight of water in tonnes/m3. The ship is generally berthed parallel to the current. With strong currents and where berth alignment materially deviates from the direction of the current, the likely force should be calculated by any recognized method and taken into account. 5.7

Wave

Forces

5.7.1 As far as analysis and computation of forces exerted by waves on structures are concerned, there are three distinct types of waves, namely: a) Non-breaking

waves,

b) Breaking waves, and c) Broken waves. 5.7.2

_Non-breaking Waves

5.7.2.1 Generally, when the depth of water against the structure is greater than about 13 times the maximum expected wave height non-breaking wave conditions occur. Forces due to non-breaking waves are essentially hydrostatic. hlethod ’ may be used for the determination of pressure due to non-breaking-waves. The method of computation using Sainflou Method is outlined in Appendix B. 5.7.2.2

‘ Sainflou

5.7.3

Breaking

5.7.3.1

Waves

Breaking

waves cause both static and dynamic

pressures.

5.7.3.2 Determination of the design wave for breaking wave conditions may be based on depth of water about seven breaker heights Hb, seaward of the structure, instead of the water depth at which the structure is located. 5.7.3.3 The actual pressures caused by a breaking wave is obtained by following the method suggested by Minikin. The method of computation using Minikin’s Method is outlined in Appendix C. 5.7.4

Broken Waues

5.7.4.1 Locations of certain structures like protective structure will be such that waves will break before striking them. In such cases, no exact formulae have been developed so far to evaluate the forces due to broken waves, but only approximate methods based on certain simplifying assumptions are available and these are given in Appendix D. *Criteria for earthquake resistant design of structures.

13

L

IS:4651(PartIIl)-1974 5.7.5 Wave Forces on Vertical Cylindrical Structures, such as Piles 5.7.5.1 The total force ( F’ exerted by non-breaking waves cylindrical pile can be divided into two components: a) Force due to drag, and b) Force due to inertia.

on a

In many of the cases it may be sufficient to know the maximum crest elevation, wavelength and maximum total force and overturning moments. A set of generalized graphs which are available in accepted pu’blica*ions *together with the following formulae may be used to compute these: FDM

-

&CDPDH’KDM

FIM=+CMPD=H~~M

FM = -

FM

FDM

MDM

=

FDM

SD

FDM FIM

MIM

=

SI

MM

_

%_ FDM

MDM

where FDnf = total drag force on a vertical pile from the sea bottom to the surface crest elevation and this occurs at the crest positions, in kg; = drag coefficient -- value of O-53 is suggested for design CD purposes; p = mass density of sea water =

-!!= 104.99 kgss/m; ( g )

D = diameter of pile, in m; H = wave height, in m; KDM = drag force factor, in m/ss; total inertial force on a vertical pile from the seabed to FIM = the free surface elevation, in kg ( occurs at some phase position between the crest and one-quarter of the wavelength ) ; CM = inertial coefficient, usually taken as 2-O for vertical circular pile; KIhf = inertial force factor, in m/s”; FM = maximum value of the combined drag and inertial force, in kg; +Rcfercncc may be made to ‘ Shore Protection, Planning and Design ‘, Technical Report No. 4 ( Third Edition ), U. S. Army Coastal Engineering Research Ccntrc.

14

.

IS : 4651(

Part III ) - 1974

MDM = moment on pile about bottom associated with maximum drag force, in kg.m; so = -effective lever arm for FDM from the bottom of pile, in m; MIM = moment on pile about bottom associated with maximum inertial force, in kg-m; S[ = effective lever arm for FIM from the bottom of pile in m; and MM = maximum total moment, in kgm. 5.7.5.2 The wave forces are smallest for piles of cylindrical cross section. For piles with flat or irregular surfaces, such as concrete and H pipes, very little is known of the effect of shape on drag and inertial forces. 5.7.5.3 Tests have indicated that the wave forces are smallest for a cylindrical section, increasing about 25 percent for a flat plate of the same projected width, between 42 and 158 percent for H sections perpendicular to the wave and between 122 and 258 percent when oriented at 45”. These figures have been indicated for guidance purposes. 5.8 Wind Forces -Wind forces on structures ance with IS : 875-1964* as applicable. 6. COMBINED

shall be taken

LOADS

6.1 The combination of loadings for design is dead plus either berthin,g ioad, or line pull, or earthquake the current and ahgnment of the berth are likely to excess of that given in Table 4, provisions for such tion of likely wind should be made. The worst taken for design.

APPENDIX ( Clause 3.2 ) DIMENSIONS A-l.

BULK

in accord-

OF

load, vertical live loads, or wave pressure. If give rise to line pull in extra pull in combinacombination should be

A

SHIPS

CARRIERS

Dead Weight Tonnage Tons

.

c

Ooerall Length

Width

Height

m

m

m

Fully Laden Draught m

4 000

100.0

15.4

7.0

6.3

6 000

118.0

16.6

8.3

6.9

8 OCO

130.0

17.6

9.5

7.4

*Code of practice for structural safety of buildings: Loading standards ( revised).

15

c

IS : 4651 ( Part III ) - 1974 Dead Weight Tonnage Tons 10 000 12 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 40 000 50 000 60 000 80 000 100~000

Overall Length

Width

150.0 163-O 180.0 194-o 205.0 223-O ~235.0 245-O 259.0 268-O

lZ5 19.4 20.7 22.8 24.7 26.5 29-7 ~32.5 35-o 39.2 42.5

Length

Width

4ro 53.0 68.0 81.0 92.0 102.0 111.0 126-o 140-o 150.0 163.0 170.0 178-o 190-o 200-o 208.0 215.0 223.0 230-O 250.0 260.0 285.0 310.0 339-o 3 70.0 398.0

8: .

Fulb Luden Draught

Height m 10-5 11.2 12.0 13’0 13.8 14.3 15.4 16.2 17-l 18.8 20.4

F9 8.5 “9:; 10-3 IO.7 11-l 11 i.? 12-o 12.6 13-o

A-2. TANKERS Dead Weight Tonnage Tons 700 Gi 3 000 4000 5 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 15 000 17000 20 000 25 000 30 000 35 000 40000 45 000 50 000 65 000 85 000 100 000 200 000 300 000 400 000 500 000

poem 11-3 12.3 13.3 14-l 15-7 17-2 18.4 20.0 21-o 22.4 24.2 25.8 27.4 29.0 30-5 32-O 34.0 38-l 41.2 47.1 53.2 57.0 69.0 16

J-wy Laden Draught

Height m 42 4-7 5-5 6.3 6.9 7.5 8-l

3’8 4.1 4-8 5.4 2;; 6.7 7.4 7.9 8.3

3:; 10’4 11.2 11.7 12.3 13-o 13.6 14-2 14-7 15.2 15-7 18.0 18.7 20.6 26.3 30.7 36.5 39.4

9”:;

P

9.5 IO.0 10.3 10-6 IO-9 11.2 11.4 13.3 14.0 14.6 18-9 21.9 26.7 26-Q

IS : 4651 ( Part III ) - 1974 CARRIERS

A-3. COMBINATION BentKjORE ( 100000 DWT NOMINAL ) Dead Weight Tonnage

Ouerall Length

Breadth (Moulded)

Depth ( Moulded )

Draught ( Loaded)

Draught ( Ballast )

Tons

m

m

m

m

m

119 190

,270

42.00

21.20

15.60

112 900

261

40.20

2140

15.50

10.62

( Max )

1‘13 180

261

40.60

24.00

16.00

IO.69

,,

102 824

259

~41.30

2040

14.20

8.29

,,

118000

261

42.00

22.80

16.13

9.0

,,

104 330

259-7

38.00

2 l-30

15.52

9.37

111 120

261

40: 60

23.00

16.00

9.36

98 720

255

40.20

23.90

14.63

9.00

113 180

261

40.60

23.00

16.00

9.74

A-4. MIXELB

CARGO

Gross Regisiered Tonnage

Dead Weight Tonnage

8.4

FREIGHTERS Displace~ment Tonnage

Overall Length

Length Between Perpendiculars

Width

Draught

Tons

Tons

Tons

m

m

m

m

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

10 000

15 000

20 000

165

155

21.5

9.5

7 500

11000

15 000

150

140

20.0

9-o

7 500

10 000

135

125

17.5

8.0

4900

6 000

8 000

120

110

16.0

7.5

3000

4 500

6 000

105

100

14.5

7.0

2 DO0

3 000

4 000

95

90

13-o

6.0

1500

2 200

3 000

90

85

12.0

3.5

1000

1500

2 000

75

70

10-5

4.5

500

700

1 000

60

55

8.5

3.5

5000

17

L

IS : 4651( Part HI ) - 1974

A-5. PASSENGER Gross Registered Tonnage

SHIPS

Displacement Tonnage

Tons

Tons

(1)

(2)

80 000 70 000 60 000 50 000 40 000 30 000 20 000 10 000 5 000

75 000 65 000 55 000 45 000 35 000 30 000 -

A-6. FISHING Gross Registered Tonnage

Length Between Perpendiculars

Width

Draught

l;

315

295

310 300

290 280

265

245

230

210

28.0

200 155

180

23.0

145 115

19.0 16.0

1 I.5 11.0 10.5 10.5 10.0 10.0 9.0 8.5 7.0

Length Between Perpendiculars

Width

Draught

89 80

15.5 14.0

315

295

35.5 34.0 32.5

125

31.0 29.5

VESSELS

Displacement Tonnage

Tons

Tons

(1)

(2)

-3 225 2 500 2 000 1500 1000 800 600 400 200 96 20 10

Overall

Letzgth

4 279 2 800 2 500 2 100 1 750 1 550 1 200 800 400 113 15.07 11

Overall Length

h 95 90 85

75

80

70

13.0 12.0

75

65

Il.0

70

60

10.5

65

55 45

IO.0

55 40 23 15

10

35

8.5 7.0

21 12

4.6

8.9

18

5.7 3.1

7.3 5.9 5.6 5.3 5.0 4.8 4.5 4.0 3.5 2.7 2.25 1.1

-

IS:4651(PartIII)-1974 A-7. INLAND

WATER

Cajacity

Oirerall

Tons

m

WAY VESSELS O&all Breadth

Length

Overall Depth

m

m

Draught Light ‘rn

Draught Loaded m

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

600 500 400 300 300 200 125

57 49.1 41 37.3 42 35.2 22

11.58 8.75 8.76 7.60 7.80 7.05 5.85

3.05 2.50 1.94

0.91 0.40 0.76 0.91 0.57 1.63 0.76

2.29 I.85 l-85 2.13 1.82 0.75 1.83

E 2.25 2.20

APP_ENDIX

B

1 Clause 5.7.2.2) SAINFLQU El.

FORMATION

METHOD

OF CLAPOTIS

R-l.1 Suppose a wave of length L and height H strikes the vertical AC, a standing wave or clapotis is ‘formed, features of which are given in Fig. 3: h, =

PI5

zFcothy wH cash 2xd L

Symbols are explained in Fig. 3. NOTE- Plotted graphs are available giving vpluer of LJz, and PI corresponding to

various values of d/L ratio, from which values of h, and PI can be readily obtained.

Assuming the same still water level on both sides of the wall, the pressure diagram will be as given in Fig. 4. El.2

B-2. OTHER

CASES

B-2.1 When there is no water on the landward side of the wall, aen the total pressure on the wall will be represented by the _triangle ACB ( Fig. 3 ) when the clapotis crest is at A. 19

c

IS : 4651 ( Part III ) - 1974 MEAN

LEVEL tORBl1 OF CLAPOTIS)

INCIDENT

dENlRE

WAVE

STILL

WATER

d = depth from stillwater level

H = height

oforiginal

free wave

L = length of wave w = weight per ms of water PI = pressure the clapotis adds to or subtracts frem still water pressure

ho = height of orbit centre ( on mean level) above still water level PI = 2!L.!zGosh ‘2

L

FIG.3

CLAPOTIS ON VERTICAL WALL

B-2.2 If there is wave action on the landward side also, then the condition

of crest of clapotis on the seaside and trough of the wave on the harbour side will produce maximum pressure from the seaside. The maximum pressure from the harbour side will be produced when the trough of the clapotis on the seaside and the crest of wave on the landside are at the structure. B-2:3 Wall of Low Meight -If the height of the wall is less than the predicted wave ~height eat the wall, forces may be approximated by drawing the force polygon as if the wall were higher than the impinging waves then analyzing only that portion below the wall crest. Forces due to a wave crest at the wall are computed from the area AFBSC, as shown in Fig. 5. 20

+--

wd

Wd-4

TROUGH PRESSURE OIAGRAW

ME:,

A’$XZ&URE:

Considering unit length of wall, R, _

M =

(d-+H+hO)

M,=-

Pl)

(d+H+&(d+Plt

l

Ri=

(wd+

d 6

6 d

Cd+li,--H)

WG

(d+ho

T-

6-

d 2

(d--p11

2 -H)*(wd-F’,) 6

whexc

R‘ = the resultant prcssurc with maximum crest level, Me = the moment due to R, about the base, Rt = the resultant pressure with minimum trough level, and

Md = the moment due to Ri about the base.

Fro. 4

SAINFLOUWAVE PRESSURE DIAGRAM STILL WATER

FIG. 5

LEVEL

PRESSURE ON WALLSOF Low I-IE~HT 21

IS:4651 (PartIn)-

APPENDIX

C

( Clause 5.7.3.3) METHOD

MINIKIN’S C-l. FORCE

DUE TO BREAKING

WAVES

Gl.1 Pressure caused by breaking waves is due to a combination namic and hydrostatic pressures as given below: a) The given by

dynamic pressure is concentrated Pm=

101

:Dw;

of dy-

at still water level and is

(D+d)

where P, = dynamic pressure, in kg/ma; KJ = height of wave just breaking on the structures,. in m; w = unit weight of the water, in kglms; d = depth of water at the structure, in m; D = deeper water depth, in m; and L, = deeper water length, in m. Values of LD and D may be computed by accepted methods*. b) The hydrostatic pressure P, on the seaward side at still water level and the pressure Pa at the depth, d, are given by

P*= For explanation c-2. G2.1

CALCULATION

w(Jq.s)

of symbols, su Fig. 6. OF FORCE

AND MOMENT

The Minikin Wave Pressure diagram is given in Fig. 6.

C-2.1.1 With Water on Land Side The resultant wave thrust R on structure. per .&near metre of structure is determined from the area of pressure diagram and is R=y+P_q(

d++)

*Reference may be made to ‘Shore Protection, Planning and Design’, Technical Report No. 4 (Third Edit& ), U. S. Army Coastal Engineering Research Centre.

22

Is:4651(ParmI)-1974 The resultant overturning moment M about the ground line before the wall is the sum of the moments of the individual areas and is given by

For explanation of symbols, see Fig. 6. C-2.1.2

With .No Water on Lund Side

Thrust

R per linear metre is

Moment M about the ground line is M=~d+ For explanation

FIG. 6

+(d++)

of symbols, see Fig. 6.

MINIKIN WAVE PRESSURE DIACUUX

APPENDIX D ( CZawe 5.7.4.1 > BROKEN

WAVES

SS:4651 (Pa.reIH)-1974 --I

ps

tSTILL WATER LEVEL

FIG. 7

WAVE PRESSURES FROMBROKENWAVES, WALL OF SHORELINE

SEAWARD

Dynamic part of the pressure Pm will be P*=2

Wdb

where w = unit weight of water, in kg/ma; ‘and db 5 breaking wave depth, in m. The static part will vary from zero at a height h,, where h, is the height of that portion of the breaking wave above still water level which is given by h, -

0.7 &,

to the maximum static pressure eat the wall base and this maximum pressure P, will be given by P, = w (d+h,) where d = depth of water at structure, in m. Assuming that the dynamic pressure is uniformly distributed from the still water level to a height, h,, above the still water level, the total wave thrust R will be R .= R, + R, = P,,,h, Jr P,(q)

=---WAh, -I- ~(d+M2 2 24

Is:4651(Part

In).1974

The overturning moment Al, about the ground line at the seaward face of the structure will be

where w = unit Tvcight of water, in kg/n+. For expli;nation

of other

symbols, set Fig, 7.

D-2.X Wave pressure diagram in this case wil! be as given in Fig. 8. Dynatnic pressure P, = *[I-z_]’ Static pressure Ps = wh’ = wh,

[1+-j

Wave thrust = R = K, + R, = Pm h’ + P, h’

Moment M=

M,

+ M,

w = unit weight of water. For explanation

of symbols, SECFig. 8. 25

Is : 4651 ( Part III ) - 1974

FIG.8 WAVE PRFMURES FROM BROKEN WAVES: WALL LANDWARD OF &iORELINE

26

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