2016-2017

SECTION ONE

EQUAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY In recognizing the rights to equal access, Wakefield Memorial High School admits students to all programs and courses of study and any associated activities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex or handicap. Should you need this information translated, please contact the principal. En caso de necesitar esta informacion traducida, por favor comuniquese con el director de la escuela de su hijo. Se voce precisar de informacoes traduzido, por favor, entre em contato com o director da escolar do seu filho. HUMAN RESOURCE OFFICE Non-Discrimination Statement The Wakefield Public Schools do not discriminate in admission to, access to, treatment in, or employment in its services, programs and activities, on the basis of race, color or national origin, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VI); on the basis of sex, in accordance with Title IX of the EDUCATION Amendments of 1972; on the basis of disability, in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA); or on the basis of age, in accordance with the Age Discrimination Act of 1974 (Age Discrimination Act), or on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, or religion in accordance with Mass General Laws, Chapter 71 and 151B. To file a complaint alleging discrimination Act, and their respective implementing regulations, please contact: Superintendent Dr. Kim Smith Wakefield Public Schools 60 Farm Street Wakefield, MA 01880 Phone: (781) 246-6400 Inquiries concerning the applicability of the aforementioned Federal laws and regulations to Wakefield Public Schools also may be referred to the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights (OCR) JW McCormack POCH, Boston, Massachusetts 02109-4557, Telephone (617) 223-9662 TTY (617) 223-9695.

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ADMINISTRATION 781-246-6440 Richard G. Metropolis, Principal Dennis M. O’Leary, Assistant Principal Terence J. Liberti, Assistant Principal Arthur J. Beebe, III, Director of Guidance

DEPARTMENT COORDINATORS & FACILITATORS Arthur Beebe James Callanan Sheri Prosperi Ruben Reinoso William Hoover Marlisa Burke Brendan Kent Thomas Bankert Paul Bavuso Robert Rozzi Joy Schilling

Guidance Business Science World Language Mathematics Life Skills Health and Wellness Performing Arts English Language Art Social Studies Visual Arts

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 781-246-6447 Arthur Beebe Suzanne Burns Kathryn O’Maley Brian Robertson Richard McKenna For alphabetical student assignments for each counselor please refer to the WMHS guidance website at www.wakefieldpublicschools.org

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION ONE Non-Discrimination Statement Mission Statement Guidance Services Course Selection Guidelines Schedule Distribution Timetable Instruction at Various Levels Requirements for WHS Diploma Promotion Criteria Guidelines for Post-Secondary Education Determination of Class Rank Honor Roll & Summer School Eligibility Academic Support Center MIAA & NCAA Athletic Eligibility Academic Expectations

1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 9 12 13 14 14 16

Business & Technology English Language Arts World Language Mathematics Performing Arts Science Social Studies Television Visual Arts Health & Life Skills Wellness Special Education Unique Programs

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17 20 26 32 37 41 47 53 54 57 58 59 61

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THE CHOICE OF A PROGRAM OF STUDIES High school students have reached a degree of maturity that permits them to exercise a considerable degree of choice in the selection of subjects for study during each of the four years of attendance. These choices should be made in terms of the individual's aspirations. Counselors will help students explore alternatives, inform them about requirements for specific career objectives, and discuss with them the value to be derived from particular subjects of study. A description of each subject offered in the curriculum is provided in this booklet. Teachers stand ready and willing to describe to students in greater detail the scope and depth of those subjects and make appropriate recommendations. Parental approval is required for the final course selection.

GUIDANCE SERVICES It is the primary purpose of the high school to provide opportunities for the fullest possible development of each individual student. Each student has different interests and abilities, plans and objectives, hopes and dreams, and ways of enjoying life. The guidance staff seeks to help each student develop to the best of his/her ability. To do this, counselors are dedicated to help students get the most out of the high school program and to develop long range plans for after graduation. To achieve these goals, counselors perform a number of different tasks: Counseling: Academic, vocational, personal, individual, group Helping: To make career, college, personal decisions Orientation: To all school services and facilities Information: Educational and vocational through fairs, discussion groups, computer programs Referral: Locating and planning programs to provide tutoring, special needs help, clinical therapy and social services through community agencies Consultation: With parents, teachers, administrators and specialists, provide appropriate intervention in crisis situations Follow-up: To help graduates and non-graduates beyond high school Teachers and counselors are eager to help students who may be having difficulties in school or with life outside of school. Sometimes talking things out is all that is needed to solve a problem. Counselors have received training in how to listen and help students who may be having a problem, and students should feel free to speak to their counselors. If necessary, a referral can be made for extra help. It is easy enough to see a counselor by making an appointment before or after school, or during an academic support block with the guidance department secretary. If an emergency exists, tell the secretary, and every effort will be made to arrange a meeting with the counselor.

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COURSE SELECTION GUIDELINES When you receive the Program of Studies  Read the course descriptions.  Review the academic requirements for graduation and college preparation in the following sections of this book.  Review your course choices with your teachers, guidance counselor, and parents.  Seek a balanced, challenging, and manageable course load. Remember  Six (6) major courses must be selected, in addition to Wellness and Health. Wakefield Memorial High School is on a modified extended block schedule. Classes will meet either for four (4) fifty-four (54) minute blocks and one (1) seventy-five (75) minute block, or six (6) forty-eight (48) minute blocks over a six (6) day cycle. There are seven blocks available for scheduling classes.  After scheduling any required courses, a student should select subjects for enrichment, enjoyment, or curiosity. All students must be fully scheduled in keeping with the demands of the Education Reform Act of 1993.  The number of students in a particular course will vary based on the requests of students. If there are an insufficient number of students requesting a particular course, the course will not be offered, and those students who have requested it will be given the opportunity to select another course.  Subjects have been assigned to different years with regard to the maturity required or the previous knowledge or skill essential for success. Students in any particular year may not elect subjects assigned to later years unless permission is granted by the subject department coordinator and the principal.  Certain subjects must be studied in a regular sequence. Such sequences include: 1. All world languages. 2. Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus. 3. The Honors and AP Science sequence.  All students must participate in Wellness unless there are severe medical reasons for excusing them. To request a medical exclusion, the student must present a written statement from a physician each year recommending removal from Wellness. If this exclusion is approved an alternative assignment will be required.  As part of the educational process, students should learn to reach and expand their experiences, whether they are as successful as they would like to be or not. That being said, students who select a particular course at the time of the initial course selection should choose the appropriate placement at that time. It may not be possible to adjust the placement at a later date given the tightness of the class size/course selection process. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with their teachers and counselors to make the most appropriate educational choices. The final course selection must be made by the close of the school year. Counselors will be available after the close of school periodically over the summer to address scheduling conflicts and urgent student needs. 4

Please contact them directly via email for information on their summer schedule and your scheduling issue. CHANGES IN A STUDENT’S PROGRAM OF STUDY WILL NOT BE MADE FROM AUGUST 1st THROUGH SEPTEMBER EXCEPT TO CORRECT ERRORS IN SCHEDULING.

SCHEDULE DISTRIBUTION TIMETABLE As has been the practice in previous years, every attempt will be made to provide students a verification of their original requests in the spring. Every attempt will be made to resolve errors, conflicts, and omissions at that time. The highest priority will be placed on programming students new to WMHS and the continued resolution of errors, conflicts, and omissions. No changes that unreasonably overload or imbalance the size of a particular class, regardless of a student’s desire to change, will be made. Class size is 26 in major courses, 24 in Science Classes, and 20 in Life Skills classes.

WAKEFIELD MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL SCHEDULE 5 Minutes 54 Minutes 4 Minutes 54 Minutes 4 Minutes 75 Minutes 4 Minutes 48 Minutes 4 Minutes 54 Minutes 4 Minutes 54 Minutes



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1 HR A

2 HR C

3 HR B

4 HR A

5 HR C

6 HR B

B

A

C

B

A

C

C

B

A

F

G

E

D

D

D

D

D

D

G

E

F

G

E

F

E

F

G

E

F

G

WITHDRAWAL FROM CLASS No student may withdraw from any course at Wakefield Memorial High School without permission of the custodial parent or legal guardian. Withdrawal forms for a course must be signed first by the Department Coordinator, Guidance Counselor, the Classroom Teacher, and in some cases an Administrator. The process of adding or dropping from one course into a new course must be no later than fifteen school days after start of course. There will be no course changes the first five days of school; only errors will be addressed in that time frame. (Art 1 to TV 1) No student may be withdrawn from, or change levels in, any full year class beyond two days after Term II progress reports are issued, or after the course has been completed. (English 9 H to English 9 CP) For all level changes grades from the original courses will transfer with the student to the new course and will be used in determining the quarterly and final grades for the new course. 5

 

When a student withdraws from a course after Term I, a “W” will appear on the student’s report card, permanent record and transcript. Students who select Honors courses should do so only after conferring with his/her current teacher(s). Changes to College Prep levels may not be possible due to high enrollment. Changes are made on a seat available basis only.

INSTRUCTION AT VARIOUS COURSE LEVELS The focus of instruction varies by level. While all course levels require seriousness of purpose, students should be aware that teachers assume that those who choose the highest level courses are making academic success their highest priority and that students in those courses will put tremendous effort and time into those subjects. Instruction in College Preparatory level courses  Is at the recommended and appropriate level for WMHS students who are planning to attend college  Assumes good command (at or above grade level) of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills  Assumes mastery of basic skills across the curriculum -- formulating a hypothesis and designing an experiment to prove it in science, creating and supporting a thesis statement in a well-developed essay in social studies, and showing the work necessary to solve a multi-step problem in mathematics  Explores content information through class discussion questions that focus on knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation  Is differentiated to address learning styles and student interests  Results in homework every night Instruction in Honors level courses  Is at the recommended and appropriate level for WMHS students who are planning to attend college  Assumes strong command (above grade level) of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills  Assumes mastery of basic skills across the curriculum -- formulating a hypothesis and designing an experiment to prove it in science, creating and supporting a thesis statement in social studies, and showing the work necessary to solve a multi-step problem in mathematics and assumes that students want to grow and improve those skills through additional assignments  Explores content information through class discussion questions that focus on knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation  Is differentiated to address individual learning styles and student interests  Results in homework every night Instruction in Advanced Placement level courses  Is designed for the most dedicated and intellectually curious students  Assumes strong command (above grade level) of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills  Assumes mastery of advanced skills across the curriculum  Explores content information through class discussion questions that focus primarily on application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation  Results in homework every night Instruction in Open Enrollment level courses  Is recommended and appropriate level for WMHS students who want to build skills in particular subject areas  Is designed to address varied learning styles and skill levels  Is differentiated to address individual learning styles and student interests 6

 

Varies pacing to best suit the needs of learners Results in homework every night

INDICATORS OF COURSE LEVELS Open Enrollment Reading and Writing tasks directly teach skills in topic development, writer’s purpose, structure, grammar, spelling & punctuation.

College Preparatory Reading and Writing tasks require good skill and understanding of topic development, structure tone, purpose, and grammar, spelling & punctuation.

Honors Reading and writing require increasing independence in understanding of topic development, tone, purpose, voice, structure, and grammar, spelling & punctuation.

Advanced Placement Reading and Writing tasks require proficiency in and understanding of topic, development, tone, purpose, voice, structure, and grammar, spelling & punctuation.

Essays and open-ended questions include direct instruction in creating beginning, middle (development and organization) and end. Problems require considerable guidance in application of strategies to reach solutions. Research assignments include explicit teaching of skills of planning, writing and syntheses and revision using electronic and traditional sources Reading, lab experiences, media viewing, etc. require comparison and contrast and some analysis and evaluation with ongoing support.

Essays and open-ended questions regularly require development of ideas with some guidance.

Essays and open-ended questions regularly require students to extend and expand upon development of ideas.

Essays and open-ended questions regularly require independently developed of ideas.

Problems require some guidance in application of strategies to reach solutions.

Problems require minimal guidance in application of strategies to reach solutions.

Problems require independent application of multiple strategies to reach solutions.

Research assignments are carried out with some guidance and require electronic and traditional sources.

Research assignments are carried out with increasing independence and require electronic and traditional sources.

Research assignments are carried out independently and require electronic and traditional sources.

Reading, lab experiences, media viewing, etc. require comparisons, contrast and some analysis and evaluations with some support.

Reading, lab experiences, media viewing, etc. require increasing independence in drawing inferences, making comparisons, analysis and evaluations.

Student performance tasks and assignments require time management and study skills directly taught and reviewed by the instructor. Text-based and multi-genre (essays, works of art, magazines, newspapers, electronic) sources are complemented with primary sources and are regularly assigned and explored with considerable support. Student tasks regularly require demonstration of creativity and originality with guidance & considerable support. Student tasks require comprehensive idea formation and clearly supported personal opinion.

Student performance tasks and assignments require application of time management and study skills with guidance.

Student performance tasks and assignments are substantial and assume increasing independent time management and study skills.

Reading, lab experiences, media viewing, etc. lead to independently drawing inferences and making comparisons, analysis and evaluations. Student performance tasks and assignments are substantial and require independent time management and study skills.

Primary sources as well as multi-genre (essays, works of art, magazines, newspapers, electronic) and text-based sources are regularly assigned and require analysis with support.

Primary sources as well as multi-genre (essays, works of art, magazines, newspapers, electronic) and text-based sources are regularly assigned and require some independent analysis.

Primary sources as well as multigenre (essays, works of art, magazines, newspapers, electronic) and text-based sources are regularly assigned for independent analysis.

Student tasks regularly require demonstration of creativity and originality with increasing independence with support.

Student tasks regularly require demonstration of creativity and originality independently. Students may extend language and are increasingly independent in making original connections, and extrapolate information to new & different applications.

Student tasks regularly require demonstration of creativity and originality independently. Students are proficient in & regularly extend language in making original connections, and extrapolate information to new & different applications.

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REQUIREMENTS FOR A WAKEFIELD MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA SUBJECT English Language Arts Social Studies Math Science World Language (Class of 2018) Fine Arts (Class of 2019) Wellness Health MCAS

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YEARS 4 3 (including U.S. 1 & 2) 4 3 2

CREDITS 20 15 20 15 10

1 4 semesters 1 semester Math ELA Science *EPP Requirements

5 5 1.25

It is recommended that all college-bound students prior to the Class of 2018 take at least two (2) years of a world language. A student should elect programs so that a minimum of thirty (30) credits per year will be accumulated toward graduation. A student must maintain a minimum of 6 classes (not including Wellness and Health) unless approved by an assistant principal, the principal, or a special education team. If students opt to take 6 ½ classes, a ½ year class may be taken P/F. Seniors enrolled in four (4) Advanced Placement courses may carry a reduced schedule.

MASSACHUSETTS COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (MCAS) All students must pass the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) in English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science as one of the criteria for earning a high school diploma. Students will have multiple opportunities to earn the MCAS competency required for high school graduation. A scaled score of 220 is generally considered to be a passing score. However, students who achieve a scaled score between 220 and 240 on the English Language Arts or Mathematics MCAS must continue to take course work in that subject area per the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and pass that coursework. An Educational Proficiency Plan (EPP) will be developed to guide further study in areas of need and sent home to parents.

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PROMOTION CRITERIA

Grade 9  Grade 10

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Earn fifteen (15) credits Pass three (3) courses Two (2) of the three (3) courses must be graduation requirements

Grade 10 Grade 11

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Earn forty (40) credits Pass five (5) courses required for graduation Pass a minimum of one (1) English Language Arts course and one (1) Wellness course

Grade 11 Grade 12

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Earn sixty-five (65) credits Pass seven (7) courses required for graduation Pass a minimum of two (2) English Language Arts courses and two (2) Wellness courses

GUIDELINES FOR POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION As the job market becomes more competitive and jobs become more technical, the need for obtaining skills beyond high school increases. Post-secondary preparation will help make students more qualified for the working world and broaden their outlook for making life decisions. In addition, research studies show that workers with more education generally earn more money over a lifetime. Students should work with their guidance counselor and teachers to pursue the most challenging and appropriate course selections in order to achieve postsecondary goals. The following information is provided to assist in this preparation. Information regarding many of these options may be obtained from guidance counselors. I.

TYPES OF INSTITUTIONS AND PROGRAMS A. Four-year degree granting institutions. 1. A student planning to attend a four-year college should plan a minimum of 16 college preparatory subjects. Suggested Academic Courses for College Preparation English Language Arts 4 courses Mathematics 4 courses (Algebra I & II and Geometry, Trigonometry or comparable coursework), 4 course Fall of 2016. 9

Sciences Social Studies World Languages Electives

3 courses (including 3 lab sciences) 3 courses (including 2 courses of U.S. History) 2 courses in the same language in High School 2 courses (from above subject areas or other college prep areas)

The admissions standards for the University of Massachusetts and the State College system emphasize a strong academic high school background so that students can enter college prepared to learn. The standard minimums are the 16 collegiate courses, a B average (3.0 GPA), and a set minimum SAT score. Each campus may choose to consider additional factors in their admissions decisions. 2.

Types of Four-Year Institutions and Programs 1. Liberal Arts 2. Engineering 3. Business 4. Nursing 5. U.S. Military Service Academies 6. University/ Colleges B. Two-Year Institutions 1. Junior Colleges 2. Community Colleges 3. Technical Schools C. Nursing Programs 1. Baccalaureate degree program 2. Associate degree program 3. Diploma Program 4. Practical Nursing program D. Preparatory Schools E. Business Schools F. Career & Technical Schools

II.

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS TESTING PROGRAM Applications and materials are available on-line and in the Guidance Office. A. Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) usually taken October of the junior year. B. Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I) recommended in May of junior year and again in October of senior year. C. Achievement Tests (SAT II) recommended in June of junior year and again in November or December of senior year, if required. D. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Advanced Placement (AP) Exams to obtain college credit before entering college. E. ACT (American College Testing) is offered at area high schools and may in most cases be submitted in lieu of SAT I. III. COLLEGE APPLICATION POLICIES A. Early Action - Highly qualified candidates may apply to colleges before November 1. If accepted, students may still apply to other colleges. 10

B. Early Decision - A candidate applied to only one college before November 1 and is usually notified of a decision before December 15. If accepted and the student decides to attend, contract is binding. C. Rolling Admissions - A program where students apply to a college and are notified of a decision as soon as their application is processed by the college. D. Deferred Entrance - A program whereby students are accepted to college but may postpone enrollment from one semester to two years. IV.

FINANCIAL AID A. FAFSA on the Web Worksheets Forms are available in the Guidance Office in mid-December. FAFSA information can also be found on www.fafsa.ed.gov . Financial Aid information is based in part on the Federal Income Tax data. Some schools verify a student’s need by requesting a copy of the Federal Income Tax return. B. Types of awards based on FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA) and the College Scholarship Selection PROFILE (CSS). 1. Pell Grant 2. Massachusetts State Scholarship Program 3. Perkins Loan 4. Stafford Loan 5. College Work Study Program 6. Institutional Award

V. AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS Outstanding achievement in any field should be recognized. High school students become eligible for awards and/or scholarships as the result of service, scholastic achievement, or talents. Scholarship information is disseminated by the guidance department to the guidance website, maintained in the guidance office, and announced periodically in the morning announcements. Morning announcements are posted daily on the high school web page.

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ACADEMIC AVERAGING & DETERMINATION OF CLASS RANK Unweighted Equivalents 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0.0 0.0

Letter Grades

Numerical Equivalents

A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DE* F

93-100 90-92 87-89 83-86 80-82 77-79 73-76 70-72 67-69 63-66 60-62 50-59 00-59

*E is a failing grade but will qualify a student to attend Summer School.

WEIGHTED GRADE POINT AVERAGE- WEIGHTED GPA A weighted grade point average is used to determine a student’s class rank. Weighted class rank is a statistic widely used for making decisions relative to college admission. To establish class rank, numerical values are assigned to final grades earned according to the following schedule. Using these values, a student rank average is computed. Courses are weighted according to their level of rigor. For example, an Advanced Placement course carries a higher value than a College Preparatory course.

GRADE A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DE/F/M/N

(1) A 5.0 4.7 4.3 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2 1.7 0

(2) H 4.5 4.2 3.8 3.5 3.2 2.8 2.5 2.2 1.8 1.5 1.2 0

(3) C 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1 0.7 0

LEVEL: 1=Advanced Placement 2=Honors 3=College Prep 4= Open Enrollment

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(4) O 3.5 3.2 2.8 2.5 2.2 1.8 1.5 1.2 0.8 0.5 0.2 0

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Election to the National Honor Society is determined by a B+ weighted or unweighted grade point average. (3.3 or better with no rounding) Any courses taken outside of Wakefield Memorial High School for enrichment or remediation will not be counted as part of the class rank/gpa computation. Any courses taken at another high school not offered here will not be computed in the rank. No WMHS credit will be awarded for courses taken outside of WMHS where no credit was granted by the provider or sending institution. Students must attend WMHS for a minimum of three (3) semesters to be included in class rank.

The system of determining class rank is as follows: 1. All courses are utilized where a regular letter grade is given, except for Wellness and Health. 2. The official computation takes place at the end of the junior, at the midpoint of senior year, and after graduation for mailing final transcripts to post-secondary schools. 3. The appropriate numerical value for each grade is taken from the weighted grade point chart. Course levels are weighted for their difficulty. 4. The credit for each course is multiplied by the numerical value for each grade; this process provides an index number. 5. The index numbers are added for each subject and divided by the total number of credits to create a weighted grade point average. 6. The calculation is carried to three (3) places beyond the decimal. 7. The calculation is based on the number of attempted credits, not the number earned. Courses failed are included in this calculation.

HONOR ROLL High Honors Honors Honorable Mention

A- and above in all courses B+ in 15 credits, nothing less than a B- in remaining credits B- or above in all courses

SUMMER AND NIGHT SCHOOL ELIGIBILITY COURSE MAKE-UP PROCEDURES 1. The Director of Guidance, Department Coordinator, and Principal must authorize any course taken outside of Wakefield Memorial High School during the regular school year or in the summer. Authorization for a course will be granted only if the course corresponds to Wakefield Memorial High School requirements in terms of hours of class time and curriculum. 2. A student who attends a summer school for make-up credit must receive authorization for the course from the Director of Guidance, the Department Coordinator, and the Principal in advance. Students may attend summer school to make up failed courses in which a final letter grade of E (50-59) is earned. 3. Wakefield Memorial High School credit will be granted if the student passes the course. Summer school grades will not be included in class rank/gpa calculations.

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4. No WMHS credit will be awarded for courses taken outside of WMHS where no credit was granted by the provider or sending institution. 5. Any courses taken outside of Wakefield Memorial High School for enrichment or remediation do not replace failing grades, nor are failing grades removed from the transcript.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER (ASC) The Academic Support Center is a valuable classroom centered experience designed to provide students with academic support and assistance throughout their high school career. These centers provide students with targeted academic assistance and resources necessary for continued academic success. Role of the Student 1. Come prepared! Students should take responsibility for their learning. You are expected to have a plan in mind on how to best accomplish your work. 2. Sign in with your assigned ASC teacher every day and inform him/her of your plan. 3. Maintain a learning atmosphere. Be courteous to others. Keep on task. Have an alternative plan in case you finish your task. 4. Actively seek out help from the ASC teacher or peer tutor.

MASSACHUSETTS INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ACADEMIC ELIGIBLITY REQUIREMENTS According to MIAA Regulations:  A student must secure during the last marking period preceding the contest (e.g. second quarter marks and not semester grades determine third quarter eligibility) a passing grade in the equivalent of four major subjects (20 credits).  To satisfy this requirement, a student must have passed sufficient courses for that marking period which carry credits totaling the equivalent of four one-year major English Language Arts courses. A student cannot at any time represent a school unless that student is taking courses that would provide credit equivalent to four one-year major English Language Arts courses.  To be eligible for the fall marking period, students are required to have passed for the previous academic year the equivalent of four one-year major English Language Arts courses. The academic eligibility of all students shall be considered as official and determining only on the date when the report cards for that ranking period are issued to the parents of all students.  Incomplete grades may not be counted toward eligibility, nor Health or Wellness classes.  A student who repeats work upon which he/she has once received credit cannot count that subject a second time for eligibility.  A student cannot count for eligibility any subject taken during the summer vacation, unless that subject has been taken previously and failed.  Academically ineligible special education students may not participate unless a waiver has been requested and granted by the MIAA.

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NCAA CLEARINGHOUSE CRITERIA FOR POSTSECONDARY ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), an organization founded in 1906 that has established rules on eligibility, recruiting, and financial aid, now regulates many college athletic programs. The NCAA has three membership divisions - Division I, Division II and Division III. Institutions are members of one or another division according to the size and scope of their programs and whether they provide athletic scholarships. If you are planning to enroll in college as a freshman and you wish to participate in Division I or Division II athletics, you must be certified by the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse ensures consistent application of NCAA initial-eligibility requirements for all prospective student athletes at all member institutions. The required NCAA Clearinghouse eligibility form can be accessed on the Internet at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net .

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ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS All departments regularly incorporate the academic, social, and civic learning expectations from the Wakefield Memorial High School Mission, Core Values, and 21st Century Learning Expectations into their written and taught curricula. All teachers assess the academic expectation “students will assume responsibility and self-direct their own learning”, using a school wide rubric and reporting student progress to students, parents, and school community twice per year. In addition, each department has adopted a specific academic expectation from the school’s Mission, Core Values, and 21st Century Learning Expectations. Teachers report student progress to students, parents, and school community. In this Program of Studies, the targeted academic learning expectation adopted by department is listed at the beginning of each curricular area. The targeted level of achievement for all students is to demonstrate proficiency, a rating of three (3) on the mission assessment report. The following school wide rubric is used in reporting student progress:

Mission Assessment Report Students are rated in each category using the following rationale: (4) Always (3) Often (2) Sometimes (1) Rarely Students will assume responsibility and self-direct their own learning by completing assigned work, preparing for assessments/class discussion, seeking help when needed, completing work missed due to absence, bringing needed materials to class, participating actively in class discussions and activities and planning, organizing and managing work independently. Students will communicate effectively in a variety of forms by organizing information/material with clarity and coherence, demonstrating technical proficiency, incorporating information and material insightfully and creatively and exhibiting an awareness of an audience. Students will use technology to access, enhance and demonstrate their learning by exhibiting fluency in the use of technology and resources available, researching questions to gain a greater understanding of content, presenting learning through various technology and identifying and utilizing reliable sources. Students will utilize critical thinking skills to solve problems both individually and collaboratively by identifying and interpreting information, evaluating information, developing and using an action plan to solve a problem or approach a new solution and correctly creating and expressing a solution or conclusion. Students will apply acquired knowledge and skills to new and/or real-world contexts by identifying pertinent concepts, demonstrating relationships between concepts, transferring concepts between academic disciplines and transferring concepts beyond the classroom. Students will create new and innovative ideas based on acquired knowledge and thinking skills by applying acquired knowledge to new situations, demonstrating creativity and originality in forming new ideas and developing innovative solutions to complex problems.

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BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CULINARY ARTS This is an area of study in which courses emphasize logic, problem-solving, decision-making, ethics, critical thinking, the involvement of media in the curriculum, and the mastery of the computer. Through a structured and sequential program of studies, students develop knowledge in the areas of accounting, banking, business law, computer science, entrepreneurship, marketing and the stock market. The use of the Internet and technology is interwoven throughout the curricula. The standards maintained in all courses are those expected of well-prepared students entering college or of qualified workers by employers. The Business curriculum provides an excellent foundation for those students who wish to major in Business Administration at the college level, pursue a Liberal Arts course of study or enter the business world as an entrepreneur. The Business Department will assess the following academic competencies from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student uses technology to access, enhance, and demonstrate their learning. The student utilizes critical thinking skills to solve problems both individually and collaboratively. College Preparatory

AP

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Personal Finance Computer Science & Software Engineering Marketing Education 1 Accounting Principles of Business

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Personal Finance Computer Science Applications Computer Science & Software Engineering Intro to Computer Programming Marketing Education 1 Marketing Education 2 Accounting Principles of Business

AP Computer Science AP Economics AP Human Geography

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Personal Finance Computer Science Applications Computer Science & Software Engineering Intro to Computer Programming Marketing Education 1 Marketing Education 2 Accounting Principles of Business Business Organization & Management Culinary Arts 1

AP Computer Science AP Economics AP Human Geography

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Personal Finance Computer Science Applications Computer Science & Software Engineering Intro to Computer Programming Marketing Education 1 Marketing Education 2

AP Computer Science AP Economics AP Human Geography

17

Accounting Principles of Business Business Organization & Management Banking Culinary Arts 2 519

PERSONAL FINANCE C 5 credits Grades All Prerequisite: None Full Year Financial literacy and decision making skills are taught in the course. Topics covered include banking, budgeting, credit and debt, investing, and insurance. Students are introduced to the workings of Wall Street and will participate in The Stock Market Game, which is a realistic, online simulation game. Extensive use will be made of Federal Reserve educational resources. Through practical exercises and case studies, students will learn how to become a wise consumer and members of a global workforce and society. 520

COMPUTER SCIENCE & SOFTWARE C 5 credits ENGINEERING (CSE) Grades All Prerequisite: None Full Year The CSE course teaches students how to solve problems using computational thinking and skills. CSE introduces students to professional programming languages and platforms and encourages students to use these tools to discover, collaborate, and create. Using Python and other languages, students develop their own app, create dynamic websites, and construct their own graphical user interface. CSE challenges students to discover connections between computer science and digital electronics and data visualization. 521

COMPUTER SCIENCE C 5 credits APPLICATIONS (CSA) Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: CSE or Permission of Dept. Full Year The CSA course focuses on integrating technologies across multiple platforms and networks, including the Internet. Students collaborate to produce programs that integrate mobile devices and leverage those devices for distributed collection and data processing. Students analyze, adapt, and improve each other's programs while working primarily in Java™ and other industry-standard tools. This course prepares students for the AP Computer Science course. 537

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER C 5 credits PROGRAMMING Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: None Full Year This course will teach students the basic concepts of computer programming. The course will be projectbased, and students will be introduced to programming concepts by learning how to code computer games and other projects. Java will be the primary language used, but other development languages will be used as well. Organizational skills including project management will be an integral part of the learning process. Students will build a portfolio of their work over the school year. This course is a prerequisite for AP Computer Science. 538

MARKETING EDUCATION 1 C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: None Full Year Marketing Education is a program of instruction in marketing, merchandising, and management intended to give the student an exploratory investigation of career opportunities in the marketing. 18

Promotion, buying and distribution, pricing, marketing information management, product planning, and career planning are explored in this course. Critical thinking, the ability to formulate ideas, and the interpretation of case studies are heavily emphasized. 548

MARKETING EDUCATION 2 C 5 credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Marketing 1 Full Year Marketing Education is an advanced program of instruction in product management. Promotion, buying and distribution, pricing, marketing information management, product planning, and career planning are explored in this course. Critical thinking, the ability to formulate ideas, and the interpretation of case studies are heavily emphasized. 539

ACCOUNTING C 5 credits Grades All Prerequisite: None Full Year Designed for those students who plan to major in Business Administration in college or who plan to enter the workforce after high school. Accounting provides the accounting and financial analysis skills needed to be successful in a college business program. Major emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills and decision-making. 542

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: None Full Year Students are exposed to a number of different areas in the field of Business Administration such as banking, marketing, business law, advertising, financial planning, entrepreneurship, and business in a global economy. Students will develop skills through case studies, oral and written reports and analyses, and research skills. Ethical business practices are discussed through the reading of current periodicals and trade papers. Career choices are investigated and researched. It is an ideal course for those who wish to explore major fields in Business Administration. 543 AP ECONOMICS AP 5 credits Grades 10 - 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Full Year This course prepares the student to take both the AP Microeconomics and the AP Macroeconomics Exams administered by the College Board. Basic economic concepts will be stressed. Analytical, problem-solving and policy-making skills will be based on these concepts. Projects will be used to add depth and realism. Students are expected to take the AP Exam(s) in May. 545

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY AP 5 credits Grades 10 - 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Knowledge of Microsoft Office Full Year This course prepares the student to take the AP Human Geography Exam administered by the College Board. Key concepts include regional and urban economics, location, scale, spatial patterns, and globalization. The course is centered on the spatial organization of population, cities, land use, transportation, and the spread of items such as products, ideas, culture and diseases. Marketing topics such as trade and business location will be addressed specifically. This course provides important marketing knowledge through projects and data analysis. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 547

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE AP 5 credits Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Intro and/or Computer Sci. Application Full Year This course prepares the student to take the AP Computer Science Exam administered by the College Board. AP Computer Science is for serious math, economics, and computer science students with above 19

average grades in math classes. The course will focus on learning the Java computer language, the most common and powerful programming language in industry today. Project-based learning will be relied upon to develop critical thinking skills. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 549

BUSINESS ORG. & MGMT. C 5 credits Grades 11 - 12 Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing or Dept. Permission Full Year 21st Century Skills are gained through working in the school store. This course is designed to provide students with practical working knowledge of the principles and procedures essential to the success of a business. Instruction in starting and growing a business, types of business ownership, familiarization of business laws, the development of a business plan, marketing a business, the hiring and managing of staff, and financing and insuring a business. Students will have an opportunity to exchange ideas on how to build a business and writing a business plan for a new venture. Students will apply their knowledge by operating the school store. They will perform all store operations including sales, ordering and inventory control, pricing, product management, and promotion. Simulation software will be used to demonstrate concepts. 554

BANKING C 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: Interview with Banking Supervisor Full Year This course is for senior students who have been recommended to the positions of Student Bankers of the First Educational Savings Bank, a branch of The Savings Bank, which operates daily at Wakefield High School. The First Educational Savings Bank trains students to interact with the public, develop a knowledge of the banking system in the United States, and stress responsibility and accuracy. Support, instruction, and employment opportunities exist in conjunction with The Savings Bank of Wakefield. 727

CULINARY ARTS I C 5 credits Grade - 11 Prerequisite: None Full Year After acquiring basic culinary and nutritional planning skills, the students in this course will learn food service techniques and participate in the planning and preparation of quantity cooking on a regular basis by operating a school based restaurant/cafe. Knowledge of budgeting, food preparation and quantity and quality control will be stressed. The essentials of service, presentation and creativity will be emphasized. 729

CULINARY ARTS II C 7.5 credits Grade - 12 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I Full Year In Culinary Arts II students will continue preparation to be able to make the choice of entering the food service workforce or to pursue further education in the culinary arts. Advanced food preparation and the essentials of excellent service, presentation and creativity will be stressed. Continuing education options will be explored.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Students study multiple subjects within this broad topic of English Language Arts. The many components of our subject reading literature, analysis writing, narrative writing, and research writing are divided into Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The processes of communication with diverse populations are embedded throughout, as is the need for students to college and career ready, and to be ready for a technological society. The ability to conduct original research in order to answer questions or solve problems; and to analyze their work is also embedded throughout the curriculum. 20

Students may have a summer reading assignment that is due at the commencement of the school year. Teachers will review this assignment with their students in the springtime of the previous year. Students seeking placement in Honors and Advanced Placement courses should consult with their current teachers to discuss the appropriateness of the selection. These classes are rigorous and require interest, ability, and discipline on the part of the students. Students taking Honors or Advanced Placement courses may be required to attend meetings in June. The English Language Arts Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student communicates effectively in a variety of forms.

College Preparatory

Honors

9

English Language Arts 9

10

English Language Arts 10

11

English Language Arts 11

12

English Language Arts 12

English Language Arts 9H English Language Arts 10 H English Language 11 H English Language Arts 12 H

10 - 12

Creative and Technical Writing

9 - 12

Public Speaking Journalism Dark Days of Future Past

Advanced Placement

AP English Lang. and Comp. AP English Lit. and Comp.

011

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 9 C 5 credits Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Full Year In grades 9 and 10, the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts challenges students to investigate a wide range of literary genres as well as delve deeply into substantive, complex expository works of nonfiction. Students will be exposed to a balance of grade-level informational texts and literature that answer and explore the understanding of oneself, others, and the world through what they read. At least ninety percent of reading will be done independently. Student writing at this level is 80 percent analytical and 20 percent narrative. Technology also plays a role in the evolution of writing through brainstorming, researching, outlining, drafting, revising, and sharing with a broad audience.

21

Students in grades 9 and 10 are also expected to meet the grade-specific grammar and conventions standards as well as vocabulary acquisition standards. Students will also be asked to speak with growing maturity to convey ideas and information both clearly and persuasively. 012

HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 9 H 5 credits Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Full Year The decision to enroll in ELA 9 or 10 Honors should not be taken lightly. As an honors student at these levels, students should be able to work independently and think abstractly. Students should also be voracious, independent readers, as well as have a passion for writing with a decreased level of guidance, as abstract analysis will anchor most of what is written. Students must also have a strong grasp of the foundational pieces of the English Language Arts curriculum, such as American English Grammar, reading, and writing at the appropriate level. Honors-level students should be able to balance an outside reading requirement with assignments that increasingly ask for abstract analyses in what they have read. Honors-level students should be active participants in class discussions and should be comfortable generating higher-order thinking questions for those discussions. Finally, students who wish to enroll in an honors-level class should seek the recommendation of their current English Language Arts teachers. 021

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10 C 5 credits Grade 10 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 9 Full Year In grades 9 and 10, the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts challenges students to investigate a wide range of literary genres as well as delve deeply into substantive, complex expository works of nonfiction. Students will be exposed to a balance of grade-level informational texts and literature that answer and explore the understanding of oneself, others, and the world through what they read. At least ninety percent of reading will be done independently. Student writing at this level is 80 percent analytical and 20 percent narrative. Technology also plays a role in the evolution of writing through brainstorming, researching, outlining, drafting, revising, and sharing with a broad audience. Students in grades 9 and 10 are also expected to meet the grade-specific grammar and conventions standards as well as vocabulary acquisition standards. Students will also be asked to speak with growing maturity to convey ideas and information both clearly and persuasively. 022

HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10 H 5 credits Grade 10 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 9 Full Year The decision to enroll in ELA 9 or 10 Honors should not be taken lightly. As an honors student at these levels, students should be able to work independently and think abstractly. Students should also be voracious, independent readers, as well as have a passion for writing with a decreased level of guidance, as abstract analysis will anchor most of what is written. Students must also have a strong grasp of the foundational pieces of the English Language Arts curriculum, such as American English Grammar, reading, and writing at the appropriate level. Honors-level students should be able to balance an outside reading requirement with assignments that increasingly ask for abstract analyses in what they have read. Honors-level students should be active participants in class discussions and should be comfortable generating higher-order 22

thinking questions for those discussions. Finally, students who wish to enroll in an honors-level class should seek the recommendation of their current English Language Arts teachers. 033

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 11 C 5 credits Grade 11 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 10 Full Year The Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts in grades 11 and 12, calls for students to be able to understand and analyze complex works of literary nonfiction as well stories, poems, plays, and novels such that they can produce ample amounts of evidence to support inferences. Students will also perform a variety of complex reading tasks from grasping the subtleties of an author’s point of view to perceiving when a text leaves matters ambiguous. Students will also become skilled at determining how multiple themes or ideas combine and intertwine to produce a complex narrative or explanation as well as evaluating the premises, arguments, and rhetoric. Students will demonstrate their listening skills by synthesizing the comments and claims of others and exercising outstanding teamwork when functioning in groups. 032

HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 11 H 5 credits Grade 11 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 10 Full Year The decision to enroll in ELA 11 or 12 Honors should not be taken lightly. As an honors student at these levels, students should be able to work independently and think abstractly. Students should also be voracious, independent readers, as well as have a passion for writing with a decreased level of guidance, as abstract analysis will anchor most of what is written. Students must also have a strong grasp of the foundational pieces of the English Language Arts curriculum, such as American English Grammar, reading, and writing at the appropriate level. Honors-level students should be able to balance an outside reading requirement with assignments that increasingly ask for abstract analyses in what they have read. Preparation for class discussion is essential for success, and students are expected to complete an average of 30-40 pages of reading a night. Honorslevel students should be active participants in class discussions and should be comfortable generating higher-order thinking questions for those discussions. Along with the requirements of the Grade 12 ELA curriculum, students are expected to successfully complete a capstone project. Finally, students who wish to enroll in an honors-level class should seek the recommendation of their current English Language Arts teachers. 035

AP ENGLISH LANGUGAGE AND COMPOSITION AP 5 credits Grade 11 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 10 Full Year This course is designed to help students become skilled readers and writers through engagement with college-level work in language and composition. AP English Language and Composition challenges students through the composition of narrative, expository, analytical, and argumentative writing about a variety of subjects as well as based on reading representing a variety of prose styles and genres. Students will read nonfiction (e.g., essays, journalism, science writing, autobiographies, and criticism) selected to give opportunities to identify and explain an author’s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques. Students will also develop research skills and the ability to evaluate, use, and cite primary and secondary sources, through conducting research and writing argument papers in which students present an argument of their own that includes the analysis and synthesis of ideas from an array of sources. A portion of the course is geared toward preparing students for the AP English Language and Composition exam. Students should expect nightly homework as well as multiple quizzes, tests, projects, and writing assignments to assess their progress. Those who elect this course should do so only after conferring with 23

their current English Language Arts teachers and their counselors. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 067

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 12 C 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 11 Full Year The Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts in grades 11 and 12, calls for students to be able to understand and analyze complex works of literary nonfiction as well stories, poems, plays, and novels such that they can produce ample amounts of evidence to support inferences. Students will also perform a variety of complex reading tasks from grasping the subtleties of an author’s point of view to perceiving when a text leaves matters ambiguous. Students will also become skilled at determining how multiple themes or ideas combine and intertwine to produce a complex narrative or explanation as well as evaluating the premises, arguments, and rhetoric. Students will demonstrate their listening skills by synthesizing the comments and claims of others and exercising outstanding teamwork when functioning in groups. 062

HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 12 H 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 11 Full Year The decision to enroll in ELA 11 or 12 Honors should not be taken lightly. As an honors student at these levels, students should be able to work independently and think abstractly. Students should also be voracious, independent readers, as well as have a passion for writing with a decreased level of guidance, as abstract analysis will anchor most of what is written. Students must also have a strong grasp of the foundational pieces of the English Language Arts curriculum, such as American English Grammar, reading, and writing at the appropriate level. Honors-level students should be able to balance an outside reading requirement with assignments that increasingly ask for abstract analyses in what they have read. Preparation for class discussion is essential for success, and students are expected to complete an average of 30-40 pages of reading a night. Honorslevel students should be active participants in class discussions and should be comfortable generating higher-order thinking questions for those discussions. Along with the requirements of the Grade 12 ELA curriculum, students are expected to successfully complete a capstone project. Finally, students who wish to enroll in an honors-level class should seek the recommendation of their current English Language Arts teachers. 060

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSTITION AP 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: English Language Arts 11 Full Year This course is for students of superior aptitude and ability who wish to undertake college-level work in literature and composition. AP English Literature and Composition is designed to challenge students’ analytical skills as they relate to reading literature, writing about literature, and discussing literature. A variety of literary forms will be explored including novels, plays, short stories, and an extensive selection of poetry. Students are held to very high standards in terms of writing and analytical skills, and each quarter students can expect numerous writing assignments taking a variety of forms. Class participation may be considered when determining quarterly grades. A portion of the course is geared toward preparing students for the AP English Literature and Composition exam. Students should expect nightly homework as well as multiple quizzes, tests, projects, and writing assignments to assess their progress. Those who elect this course should do so only after conferring with their current English Language Arts teachers and their counselors. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 24

089

PUBLIC SPEAKING C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: None Full Year The Massachusetts College and Career Readiness anchor standards state: “To become college and career ready, students must have ample opportunities to take part in a variety of rich, structured conversations—as part of a whole class, in small groups, and with a partner—built around important content in various domains...Whatever their intended major or profession, high school graduates will depend heavily on their ability to listen attentively to others so that they are able to build on others’ meritorious ideas while expressing their own clearly and persuasively. “New technologies have broadened and expanded the role that speaking and listening play in acquiring and sharing knowledge and have tightened their link to other forms of communication. The Internet has accelerated the speed at which connections between speaking, listening, reading, and writing can be made, requiring that students be ready to use these modalities nearly simultaneously. Technology itself is changing quickly, creating a new urgency for students to be adaptable in response to change.” Students electing to take this course should be prepared for an exciting exploration of what it means to communicate in today’s world. 090

JOURNALISM C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: None Full Year An interactive, hands-on course, Journalism provides students with a broad range of media experiences. Students will learn how to write news stories, features, editorials, and sports stories. Topics covered include the history of American media, current issues and events, public relations, bias, ethics, court cases, and the First Amendment. In addition, Journalism is the lab course for creating the school newspaper, WMHS exPRESS, which is published each term. Journalism students work as reporters by covering events and writing articles for the newspaper. In the process, they will improve their researching, interviewing, writing, and editing skills. The textbook for this course, Journalism Today, is supplemented by various videos and films related to the media industry. 091

CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WRITING C 5 credits Grades - 10, 11 & 12 Prerequisite: None Full Year Creative and Technical Writing is a course designed for students who are deeply interested in exploring their creative writing and technical writing skills. In creative writing, students will learn the various elements of genres such as long fiction, short stories, poetry, playwriting/screenwriting, and personal essay writing, among others. They are expected to try all genres, but they will also have the opportunity to work specifically in the genre that appeals to them. Class activities include reading and discussing published works, writing in and out of class, sharing and critiquing their writing in a writer’s workshop format, editing their work based on teacher and peer feedback, and preparing their work for publication. One requirement of the course is to participate in the creation of Reflections, the school’s literary and art online magazine, which includes writing pieces that are completed both in and out of the Creative Writing class. At the end of this course, students also compile their writing into a portfolio which will factor into their final grade. Texts for this course include Stephen King’s On Writing and the compilation American Short Stories. In technical writing, students will explore complex subjects and how to make them more easily understood. They will learn how to write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Students will learn how the Internet is changing the face of scientific and technological writing. Students will also learn what makes technical writers successful, interviewing 25

skills, the importance of the revision process, and will experience communicating and sharing ideas globally. 094

DARK DAYS OF FUTURE PAST C 5 credits Grades All Prerequisite: None Full Year This course offers students the opportunity to explore, analyze, and compare Gothic and dystopian fiction. Students will explore representative works from each genre, reading both foundational texts as well as modern manifestations. As such, students will not only read seminal texts such as Stoker’s Dracula and Orwell’s 1984, but also explore how these works forged the paths for the likes of American Horror Story and The Hunger Games, respectively. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify the recurring themes, tropes, archetypes, and motifs found in Gothic and dystopian fiction, and will make inferences while juxtaposing the two genres. Students enrolling in this elective should be self-motivated and interested in literature and/or the genres at hand. Students are not only expected to keep up with regular reading and writing assignments associated with standard English classes, but also to read extensively for this class while creating multimedia products inspired by the readings. These products may take the form of hypertextual readings, crowdsourced annotations, remixes, digital stories, videos, and infographics. Extended texts may include 1984, Brave New World, Dracula, Frankenstein, and Fahrenheit 451.

WORLD LANGUAGE Learning a world language can be an exciting and rewarding experience for all students. Courses meet the needs of students of differing abilities on various levels. Proficiency in the foreign language is the goal in all courses. In addition to learning another language, students learn about the customs, music, literature, and other interesting aspects of the people who speak the language and the countries where the language is spoken. The use of movies, audio and video tapes, computers, CD-ROM, and the personal experiences of the teachers affords the students contact with the language and culture that is very realistic. Students seeking placement in Honors and Advanced Placement courses should consult with their current teacher to discuss the appropriateness of the selection. Beginning with the class of 2018 (freshman class of 2014-2015) world language will be a two year graduation requirement in accordance with MassCore recommendations. The World Language Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: Students communicate effectively in a variety of forms.

10

College Preparatory Italian II Latin II French III

Honors Latin II - Honors French III - Honors Spanish III – Honors

Advanced Placement

Spanish Lang & Cult 1B

11

12

Spanish III Latin III French III French IV Spanish III Italian II-III Latin III French III

French III - Honors French IV - Honors Spanish III - Honors Spanish IV - Honors French III - Honors French IV - Honors 26

AP Spanish Language AP French Language

9 - 12

French IV Spanish III Spanish IV Spanish V Bellas Artes Italian II-III Latin I Italian I French II

French V - Honors

AP Latin

French II - Honors Spanish II - Honors

Spanish Lang & Cult 1A

Spanish I Spanish II 111

LATIN I C 5 credits Grades -All Prerequisite: None Full Year Latin I begins a grammar and translation based approach to learning the mechanics of classical Latin, while exploring the foundations of ancient Roman culture and history, as well as the civilizations that influenced it. Using Wheelock's Latin, students will learn the majority of declensions and conjugations necessary to understand basic Latin constructions, while also drastically increasing their knowledge of English grammar and vocabulary by learning its roots. The texts the students translate will be from authentic ancient sources, generating an exploration of classical culture and history. 112

LATIN II C 5 credits Grades - 10, 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Latin I Full Year Latin II opens with a review of Latin I, and then continues on through the remainder of Latin grammar. Using Wheelock's Latin, the students will conclude learning all basic and advanced constructions, and be able to translate all ancient Latin texts without adaptation. English grammar and vocabulary will continue to improve dramatically through an advanced understanding of its roots, and the course will take looks at significant Latin speeches and poetry. Also, students will study the culture and history of the Roman Empire and its immediate successors, gaining a broad understanding of how its culture influenced our own. After the completion of Latin II, students should expect to be able to translate ancient texts as well as have the tools to learn any Romantic language (Spanish, Italian, French, Portuguese) at an advanced pace. The year will culminate with the National Latin Exam, the most recognized nation-wide Latin test. 115

LATIN II Honors H 5 credits Grade 10-12 Prerequisite: Latin I Full Year Latin II opens with a review of Latin I, and then continues on through the remainder of Latin grammar. Students will use Wheelock's Latin to conclude learning how to translate ancient texts without adaptation. This honors section will emphasize an in-depth look at more unadapted texts to launch conversations into the culture and history of Ancient Rome. They will look at significant speeches and poetry, and gain a broad understanding of how ancient culture has influenced our own. After the completion of Latin II, students should expect to be able to translate ancient texts as well as have the tools to learn any Romantic language (Spanish, Italian, French, Portuguese) at an advanced pace. The year will culminate with the National Latin Exam, the most recognized nation-wide Latin test.

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113

LATIN III C 5 credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Latin II Full Year Latin III will be a yearlong study of major, unadapted Latin texts. Including selections from Cicero, Virgil, and Ovid, among others, the course will provide an environment for students with advanced Latin training to directly translate ancient texts, providing a direct window into the culture and philosophies of the era. Over the course of the year, translation skills will improve and mature, and the students will be regularly challenged to learn directly from the great teachers of the classical world. 118

AP LATIN AP 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: Latin III Full Year AP Latin will provide an opportunity for students beginning to transform into advanced Latin readers. The course will cover a selection of readings in preparation for the AP examination, focusing on the writings of Caesar and Virgil. Along the way, advanced discussions will take place regarding the evolution of Latin literature and culture. Students will be expected to take the AP Latin Exam in May. FRENCH II C 5 credits Grades – All Prerequisite: French I or middle school equivalent Full Year In this course the student’s ability to understand, speak, read and write French is further developed. Life and customs in French speaking countries are explored through readings, doing projects, such as building Parisian monuments and technological resources, including audio and videotapes. French is spoken as much as possible, reinforcing oral proficiency and listening comprehension skills. 123

FRENCH II Honors H 5 credits Grades – All Prerequisite: French I or middle school equivalent Full Year In this course students will increase guided conversation to use new vocabulary. Language acquisition will be augmented by the use of visuals, and audio and videotapes. Some short compositions in French are required. Students will study the culture and geography of France through various oral and written projects on French departments, regions and Parisian monuments. Except for grammatical explanations, the class is conducted mostly in French. 124

125

FRENCH III C 5 credits Grades - 10,11 & 12 Prerequisite: French II Full Year In this course students will learn new grammar and vocabulary and increase ability to speak and understand French. Readings, audio and video tapes, and projects increase the student’s understanding of French culture and the culture of French-speaking countries. Instruction will be in French as much as possible. 126

FRENCH III Honors H 5 credits Grades - 10, 11 & 12 Prerequisite: French II Full Year In this course the student is expected to express personal ideas in French. Oral summaries of readings, skit preparation and other activities reinforce language skills. Videos and the acquisition of vocabulary increase the student’s appreciation of French culture. Francophone literature is introduced. Students will read and discuss a French detective novel Drôle de Mission. Advanced grammar is taught and basic structures are reviewed. Students are expected to develop and present in French an on-going project based on a French-speaking country.

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127

FRENCH IV C 5 credits Grades - 11 and 12 Prerequisite: French III Full Year In this course oral skills will be improved through class discussions and videotapes. Students will present French cultural projects about French-speaking areas of the world in French. Writing skills will be improved through creative compositions. The class is conducted in French as much as possible. FRENCH IV Honors H 5 credits Grades – 11 & 12 Prerequisite: French III Full Year In this class students will read selections from French literature. Compositions are required to reinforce grammatical knowledge. Students will read and discuss the French novel Le Petit Prince and Cyrano de Bergerac. Students will explore the culture of French departments and territories by developing and presenting in French an on-going project based on French overseas departments and territories. This class will be conducted almost exclusively in French. 128

129

FRENCH V Honors H 5 credits Grade - 12 Prerequisite: French IV Full Year The major components of French V Honors are culture and literature. Drama, the novel and the short story are all studied. Students will read and discuss the French novels Les Miserables and L’Etranger. Discussion of the readings is in French. Video and audiotapes continue the student's exposure to French language and culture. Grammar is reviewed as necessary. Compositions and essays in French V Honors are longer and more frequent than in previous courses. At all times the student will speak in French in class. For pupils interested in the AP Exam, special preparation will be provided. FRENCH V C 5 credits Grade – 12 Prerequisite: French IV Full Year In this course oral skills will continue to improve through class discussions, videotapes and presentations. Students will read and discuss, in French, selected novels. Writing skills will continue to improve through creative compositions. The class will be conducted mostly in French. 130

AP FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE AP 5 credits Grade – 12 Prerequisite: French IV Full Year In the AP French language course, students elect to use French exclusively to work towards mastering their oral proficiency. At this level, students will explain, support an opinion, hypothesize, and persuade in discussions and essays about social interests, issues and activities, different cultures, art, and history. Numerous works of literature are read, discussed, and analyzed. Grammar is reviewed to strengthen students’ speaking and writing skills. This course is conducted in French and students are expected to take the AP French Language Exam in May. 148

146

SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE 1A 5 credits Grades -9 Prerequisite: None Full Year The Spanish Language and Culture 1A is the first part of a two year sequence designed for those students who would like to take a Spanish 1 course, but at a slower pace compared to the CP Spanish 1 course now offered. In this course students learn basic grammar, vocabulary and culture. Instruction in the classroom is reinforced with the use of videos, tapes and cultural projects.

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147

SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE 1B 5 credits Grades -10 Prerequisite: Spanish Language & Culture 1A Full Year The Spanish Language and Culture 1B is the second part of the two year sequence designed for those students who successfully completed the Spanish Language & Culture 1A. In this course students learn more advance grammar, vocabulary and culture. This course will prepare students for Spanish 2CP. 131

SPANISH I C 5 credits Grades -All Prerequisite: None Full Year In this course students learn the basic vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to speak and understand Spanish, read appropriate selections, and write basic sentences. Introduction to Spanishspeaking cultures and oral proficiency will be emphasized. Instruction in the classroom is reinforced with the use of videos, tapes and cultural projects. 133

SPANISH II C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: Spanish I or middle school equivalent Full Year In this course the student’s ability to understand, speak, read and write Spanish is further developed. Life and customs in the Hispanic World are explored through readings and technological resources, including audio and videotapes. Spanish is spoken as much as possible, reinforcing oral proficiency and listening comprehension skills. 134

SPANISH II Honors H 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: Spanish I or middle school equivalent Full Year In this course students will increase guided conversation to use vocabulary. Language acquisition will be augmented by the use of visuals and audio and DVDs. Some short compositions in Spanish are required. Students will study the culture and geography of Spanish-speaking countries through various oral and written projects. 135

SPANISH III C 5 credits Grades - 10, 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Spanish II Full Year In this course students will utilize basic oral and written language skills in an expanded context. Readings are presented with discussions in Spanish. Videos and projects using technological resources enhance the student’s knowledge and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Instruction is conducted in Spanish as much as possible. 136

SPANISH III Honors H 5 credits Grades - 10, 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Spanish II Full Year In this course the student is expected to express personal ideas in Spanish. Oral summaries of readings, skit preparation and other oral activities reinforce language skills. Students will continue to study the culture and geography of Spanish-speaking countries through various oral and written projects. 137

SPANISH IV C 5 credits Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Spanish III Full Year In this course students will solidly review previously learned concepts, increase cultural understanding and learn more advanced structures and vocabulary through reading short stories, writing essays, listening to native speakers and speaking in Spanish. The class will be conducted in Spanish as much as possible, and will include hands-on activities (i.e., skits, cooperative groups, projects, multimedia presentations, etc.) 30

138

SPANISH IV Honors H 5 credits Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Spanish III Full Year In this course students will be required to summarize, interpret, and analyze short literary works both in writing and in conversation. Advanced grammar and vocabulary will be introduced and used in a variety of activities. Students will produce multimedia presentations (i.e. PowerPoint research projects, videos) and dramas modeling advanced thematic vocabulary and grammatical structures in Spanish. Visuals and audiotapes will be used to further build listening and speaking skills. Students will often be required to work in cooperative groups for discussion, activities and presentations. The class is largely student-centered and will be conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. 145

BELLAS ARTES C 5 credits Grade -12 Prerequisite: Spanish IV CP or H Full Year This course is a unique way to put your years of Spanish to use. It meets you wherever you may be on the road to fluency. Students will experience the whole language in the rich context of the fine arts. Explore different Hispanic cultures in different time periods and discover outstanding achievements in music, art, cinema, and literature. Observation, conversation and composition in Spanish will combine old and new, building vocabulary and grammatical structure. Term projects are included. 139

SPANISH V C 5 credits Grade - 12 Prerequisite: Spanish IV Full Year In this course students will be provided numerous opportunities to express themselves about a wide variety of topics related to Hispanic culture and contemporary life. Video and audiotapes will further develop listening ability. Reading selections from both classical and contemporary Hispanic authors will provide further insight into Hispanic culture. The class will be conducted mostly in Spanish. SPANISH V Honors H 5 credits Grade – 12 Prerequisite: Spanish IV Full Year Hispanic literature and culture are the major elements of Spanish V. Readings include the Spanish and Latin American short story, drama, poetry and the novel. Numerous tapes and movies provide a thorough overview of Hispanic culture, and are correlated with readings. Speaking and listening proficiency are enhanced through active discussion of both the readings and visual materials and current events. Writing skill is promoted by means of essays and original compositions. Grammar is reviewed as necessary. Whenever appropriate, students may attend cultural events or go on field trips in the greater Boston area. This course is taught in Spanish. 140

141

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE AP 5 credits Grade - 12 Prerequisite: Spanish IV Full Year In the AP Spanish Language and Culture course students elect to use Spanish almost exclusively to work towards mastering their oral and written proficiency. At this level, students will explain, support an opinion, hypothesize, and persuade in discussions, presentations, essays and emails about social interests and activities, modern life, environmental issues, art, science and technology in the Spanish speaking world. Students will also compare and contrast these Hispanic cultural topics with their own culture. Grammar is reviewed to strengthen students’ speaking and writing skills. This course moves at an accelerated pace and prepares students to take the College Board AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam in the spring. This course is conducted in Spanish and students are expected to take the AP Spanish Language Exam in May. 31

142

ITALIAN I C 5 credits Grades -All Prerequisite: None Full Year In this course students learn the basic vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to speak and understand Italian, read appropriate selections, and write basic sentences. Introduction to the Italian culture and oral proficiency will be emphasized. Instruction in the classroom is reinforced with the use of videos, tapes and cultural projects. 143

ITALIAN II C 5 credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Italian I Full Year In this course the student’s ability to understand, speak, read and write Italian is further developed. Life and customs in Italy are explored through readings and technological resources, including audio and videotapes. Italian is spoken as much as possible, reinforcing oral proficiency and listening comprehension skills. ITALIAN III C 5 credits Grades – 10-12 Prerequisite: Italian II Full Year In this course students will utilize basic oral and written language skills in an expanded context. Readings are presented with discussions in Italian. Videos and projects using technological resources enhance the student’s knowledge and appreciation of Italian culture. Instruction is conducted in Italian as much as possible. 144

MATHEMATICS The courses presented here are the courses of study in mathematics at Wakefield Memorial High School. These courses are designed to be taken in a specific logical sequence to best prepare students for postsecondary success. Technology will be integrated in every course as part of the Common Core State Standards. Beginning with the class of 2017 mathematics is a four year graduation requirement in accordance with MassCore recommendations. All math courses will require some degree of home preparation. The amount of home preparation will be increased for honors level and AP courses. A TI-83+ or TI-84 graphing calculator is the calculator required for those courses that list it as mandatory. Students are encouraged to purchase their own graphing calculator, but calculators are available for rent from the Mathematics Department Coordinator. Subsidy is available for those in financial need. The Math Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student applies acquired knowledge and skills to new and/or real-world contexts.

Wakefield Memorial High School Mathematics Pathways

Typical pathway for students who wish to go to a four year college

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Algebra 1 L2, CP

Geometry L2, CP, H

Algebra 2 L2, CP, H

Precalculus CP, H

32

For students who successfully complete Algebra 1 in 8th grade For students who did not take Algebra 1 in 8th grade, but wish to take Calculus and/or Physics in high school.

For students who may need extra support in math after middle school

Geometry L2, CP, H

Algebra 2 L2, CP, H

Precalculus CP, H

Calculus H, AP

Algebra 1 CP

Geometry CP, H -andAlgebra 2 CP, H

Precalculus CP, H

Calculus H, AP

Geometry L2

Algebra 2 L2 -and/orMath Apps. & Fin. Lit. CP

Concepts in Algebra

Algebra 1 L2

Statistics AP is available as an elective concurrently or after Precalculus. These are the most common pathways, but other pathways are available by teacher recommendation in order to meet the needs of all students. 309

CONCEPTS IN ALGEBRA O 5 credits Grade 9 Prerequisite – Recommendation of current math teacher Full Year This is a first course in algebra designed to help develop the student’s mathematical maturity and confidence. The emphasis is on the real number system and its properties, working with algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing equations and inequalities, and an introduction to linear functions. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready for Algebra 1 Level 2. ALGEBRA 1 LEVEL 2 C 5 credits Grades – All Prerequisite: Math 8 or Concepts in Algebra Full Year The Algebra 1 Level 2 course at Wakefield Memorial High School has been aligned with the Common Core State Standards. It is designed to develop an understanding of the traditional algebraic concepts and to prepare students for the study of advanced topics in mathematics with a less theoretical approach. An emphasis on modeling will be present throughout the study of linear equations and inequalities, functions of the linear, quadratic, absolute value, and exponential families, systems of linear equations, properties of exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, and an introduction to probability and statistics. 310

ALGEBRA 1 C 5 credits Grades – All Prerequisite: Math 8 Full Year The Algebra 1 course at Wakefield Memorial High School has been aligned with the Common Core State Standards. It is designed to develop an understanding of the traditional algebraic concepts and to prepare students for the study of advanced topics in mathematics. An emphasis on modeling will be present throughout the study of linear equations and inequalities, functions of the linear, quadratic, 311

33

absolute value, and exponential families, systems of linear equations, properties of exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, and an introduction to probability and statistics. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 318

FINANCIAL LITERACY & C 5 credits Grade 12 MATH APPLICATIONS Full Year Prerequisite: Geometry &Teacher Recommendation Topics in the math applications portion of the course will include: preparation for college entrance exams, geometry, probability and counting, an introduction to statistics, and an introduction to trigonometry. In the second semester, youth financial literacy will be addressed by covering topics including planning and budgeting, investing, debt and credit, insurance, and real consumer situations will be introduced allowing students to apply learned mathematics to make financial decisions. Concepts will be presented and applied through activities which allow for the integration and demonstration of multiple mathematical skills. Completion of these activities will provide students with a deeper proficiency of the practical uses of mathematics as well as develop strategies for greater success with standardized math testing. This course is designed for senior students as an alternative to Algebra 2 level 2. Students who are electing this course seeking a 4th year of mathematics for fulfillment of their Educational Proficiency Plan (EPP) must pass this course to meet the state requirement for a diploma. 321

GEOMETRY C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Full Year This course connects algebraic, coordinate, and transformational approaches as well as threedimensional geometry. Students will experience a wide range of proof methods by reasoning, logic, writing arguments and analyzing arguments. Proofs are developed using both inductive and deductive reasoning. Students will perform geometric constructions with a compass and straightedge. Knowledge of Algebra 1 is essential for success in this course, as there is a strong Algebra 1 integration within the numerous coordinate geometry and probability applications. Some understanding of geometry in nature, art, architecture, and science will be introduced. 322

GEOMETRY LEVEL 2 C 5 credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Full Year This college preparatory course covers the same content as the Geometry CP course, but does so using a less theoretical approach. It will focus in the study of points, lines, planes, triangles, polygons, and circles. The three basic trigonometric functions will be introduced and how these functions are used to solve right triangles will be studied. Students will perform constructions with a compass, straight edge, and protractor throughout the course. 323

GEOMETRY HONORS H 5 credits Grades 9 & 10 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Full Year This course connects algebraic, coordinate, and transformational approaches as well as threedimensional geometry. Students will master a wide range of proof methods by emphasizing both inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, and writing and analyzing arguments. There is a strong Algebra 1 integration within the numerous coordinate geometry sections, as well as the probability and statistics applications, so a thorough knowledge of Algebra 1 is essential for success in this course. Some understanding of geometry in nature, art, architecture, and science will be introduced. Students will perform geometric constructions with a compass and straight edge. There is a mandatory summer assignment which will be given at the end of the previous school year. 34

331

ALGEBRA 2 C 5 credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra & Geometry (completed or concurrent) Full Year Algebra 2 is a course for students who have completed Geometry or who have completed Algebra 1 and are taking Geometry concurrently. The course of study will follow Algebra 2 Common Core State Standards, including quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and radical functions and their transformations, complex numbers, probability, data analysis, and statistics. Upon completion of this course, students are equipped to take the SAT II: Math Level I subject test. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 333

ALGEBRA 2 HONORS H 5 credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry (completed or concurrent) Full Year Algebra 2 Honors is a course for students who have completed Geometry or who have completed Algebra 1 and are taking Geometry concurrently and wish to pursue a challenging course of study. The course of study includes functions, rational expressions, polynomial functions, solutions of systems of equations, logarithms, quadratic equations and functions, data analysis, and probability. Upon completion of this course, students are equipped to take the SAT II: Math Level I subject test. The honors program should also provide the background for some independent study in the field of mathematics. A mandatory summer assignment will be given at the end of the previous school year. A thorough knowledge of Algebra 1 is essential for success in this course. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 334

ALGEBRA 2 LEVEL 2 C 5 credits Grades 11& 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry (completed or concurrent) Full Year This college preparatory course covers the same content as the Algebra 2 CP course, but does so using a less theoretical approach. Mathematical modeling will be emphasized through the study of linear equations in two variables graphing, systems of equations, graphing quadratic functions, factoring, solving quadratic equations, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, data analysis, and probability. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 335

ADVANCED ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 C 5 credits Full Year This course is designed as an alternative to precalculus as a preparatory course for college level math. This course will provide students with a review of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, with incorporation of real-world applications and projects. Students will also study right triangle trigonometry, the trigonometric functions and identities, as well as applications of trigonometry, and a study of sequences and series. This course is not open to students that have completed precalculus. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 341

PRECALCULUS C 5 credits Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Full Year This precalculus course prepares students to take calculus and is for students who have a serious interest in mathematics. Students will be challenged with complex problems requiring higher order and critical thinking skills. This course provides a theoretical approach to studying functions, trigonometry, analytic geometry, sequences and series, parametric equations, polar curves, and vectors. Upon completion of this course, students are equipped to take the SAT II: Math Level II subject test. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 35

343

CALCULUS H 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: Precalculus Full Year This is an introductory course in calculus for student who wish to experience calculus in high school, without being at the AP level. Topics from differential and integral calculus are included in this course. The subject matter includes a study of limits, the derivative and its applications, the integral and its applications. Seniors electing this course are advised that there is no alternative level other than AP, so any student who remains in the course beyond the add/drop period will not have an alternative level to switch into. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 345

PRECALCULUS HONORS H 5 credits Grades 11&12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Full Year Honors Precalculus is a course for students with an interest in mathematics or science as a possible career path. This course provides a theoretical approach to studying functions, trigonometry, analytic geometry, sequences and series, parametric equations, polar curves, vectors, and limits. A mandatory summer assignment will be given at the end of the previous school year that encompasses Algebra 1 through Algebra 2 concepts, and will be reviewed, discussed, and tested within the first week of school. Upon completion of this course, students are equipped to take the SAT II: Math Level II subject test. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 347

AP CALCULUS AB AP 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: Precalculus Full Year Advanced Placement Calculus AB is for serious mathematics and science students with above average grades in Precalculus H or Precalculus. The program includes a study of limits, the derivative and its applications, the integral and its applications. The course includes optimization problems, related rate problems, area and volume problems, as well as a variety of other applications. The curriculum for this course is determined the by College Board, and students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 348

AP CALCULUS BC AP 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: Precalculus H Full Year Advanced Placement Calculus BC is for serious mathematics and science students with above average grades in Precalculus H. It includes all topics covered in AP Calculus AB, as well as the calculus of parametric and polar curves, vectors, and series. This course is equivalent to a full year of calculus at most colleges and an acceptable AP exam score can earn a student college credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for Calculus AB. Students electing this demanding course should have a strength in mathematics, and a strong work ethic in order to succeed. The curriculum for this course is determined the by College Board, and students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 354

PROBABILITY & STATISTICS C 5 credits Grades 11& 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Full Year This college preparatory course is designed for those students who would like to study statistics prior to entering college or those that would like an alternative to precalculus or calculus. Students will be introduced to tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. There will be four broad conceptual themes exploring data: observing patterns and departures, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students will be expected to complete projects relating to real world applications of statistics. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. 36

355

AP STATISTICS AP 5 credits Grades 11& 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Full Year In this course, students will be study the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. There will be four broad conceptual themes exploring data: observing patterns and departures, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students electing this course should have strong reading and writing skills as they will use them to complete in depth investigative tasks to help access the curriculum. If elected in the junior year, a student must be enrolled in precalculus concurrently. The curriculum for this course is determined the by College Board, and students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator.

PERFORMING ARTS The Wakefield Memorial High School Performing Arts Department has gained state and regional recognition for its excellence in music and theatre. Students who anticipate a career in music will find that the course offerings will prepare them for collegiate studies in music theory, music history, music education and music performance. The performance ensembles (band, orchestra & chorus) exist for students who derive pleasure from musical expression and have the work ethic to be a contributing part of a successful organization. Advanced groups are available for students who wish to have greater study in musical performance. Students interested in these groups will audition the previous spring. All instrumental and vocal students are expected to study their major instrument with a qualified instructor outside of school. This private study is essential to the individual musical development of students in the program. Private lessons are provided, at the student’s expense, through the Wakefield After School Music Lesson Program. Limited scholarship funds are available for deserving students in need of financial assistance. The Wakefield Memorial High School Performing Arts Department is actively involved with the Massachusetts Music Educators Association. This group provides several opportunities for musically talented students including Northeastern District and All-State Music Ensemble auditions. The department also provides extra-curricular activities such as marching band, jazz band, winter percussion, A Cappella and Theatre Arts Productions to enhance the performing arts experience for the students of Wakefield Memorial High School. All students enrolled in Performing Arts Department classes are expected to demonstrate a sincere interest in the arts, and all students enrolled in musical performing groups are required to attend all rehearsals, concerts and activities associated with the performance groups. The Performing Arts Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: Students communicate effectively in a variety of forms. College Preparatory 9-12

Honors

Music Theory & Composition I Music Theory & Composition II Introduction to Theatre Advanced Topics in Theatre History of Music Critic’s Guide to the Performing Arts 37

Wind Ensemble String Ensemble Chamber Singers Treble Choir

Advanced Placement

Concert Band Orchestra Strings Chorale Electronic Music Comp & Songwriting 10 11 12

AP Music Theory AP Music Theory

800

HISTORY OF MUSIC C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: None Semester This course will provide students with knowledge of music from Baroque time (1600’s) through the present. There will be focus on diverse styles including: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, blues, Motown, pop, rock, hip-hop and multi-cultural influences. Students will also develop an understanding of how culture, heritage, history, civilization, and current issues are recorded and reflected in music. Activities include, listening to music on a daily basis, class discussions, as well as reading and individual research on specified topics. Students will use the music computer lab to enhance study in this course. No experience in choral or instrumental music is necessary. Students do not need to know how to read music. CRITIC’S GUIDE TO THE PERFORMING ARTS C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: None Semester This course is designed to help students become thoughtful and perceptive consumers of the Performing Arts. Course content will be linked to the arts calendar of the Greater Boston area. A minimum of four professional, semi-professional, and community performing arts events will be booked for students to attend as a group. Students will be prepared for these performances by in-class discussions and research on the genres and periods included in the event. Performances may take place outside of school hours and will be required as part of the class. Seminar-style discussions and critical writing subsequent to the events will heighten students’ awareness of the characteristics inherent in a variety of performing art forms. Students will use the music computer lab to enhance study in this course. Students will be expected to keep a portfolio of their research and critical reviews. 801

803

ELECTRONIC MUSIC COMPOSITION AND SONGWRITING C 5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: None Full Year By working through a series of musical composition exercises, students will develop skills in writing melodies, realizing basic harmonization’s, utilizing various rhythm patterns, and creating pieces which demonstrate various compositional forms. Students will also study the art of contemporary songwriting by listening to some of the great songwriters of our time and studying lyrics as poetry. Students will be using state-of-the-art computer-based music notation software (Finale) and Garage Band throughout, and will learn how to produce professional-quality manuscripts. 809

WIND ENSEMBLE H 5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: Audition Full Year The Wind Ensemble will be auditioned among high school students and incoming freshmen the spring of the previous year. This ensemble also makes up the personnel of the winds, brass and percussion for the Symphony Orchestra. Students in the Wind Ensemble will rehearse and perform significant works from the wind band repertoire in preparation for school concerts and other events scheduled by the director. Because of the difficult nature of the ensemble repertoire, all members of the Wind Ensemble 38

are highly encouraged to study their instrument with a qualified instructor outside of school. All performances and dress rehearsals are mandatory. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as record themselves for evaluation. In addition, Wind Ensemble students will perform individual playing assessments, written responses to listening examples and prepare the solo audition piece for the Northeast District Festival for teacher evaluation. 811

CONCERT BAND C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: Ability to play a wind band instrument Full Year The Concert Band is an elective in the performing arts department open to students in grades 9-12. Intermediate to advanced proficiency is expected of each player. Students in the Concert Band will rehearse and perform significant works from the wind band repertoire in preparation for school concerts. Members of the Concert Band are highly encouraged to study their instrument with a qualified instructor outside of school. All performances and dress rehearsals are mandatory. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as record themselves for evaluation. In addition, Concert Band students will perform individual playing assessments and written responses to listening examples. 812

MUSIC THEORY & COMPOSITION I C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: None Semester This course is an elective in the performing arts department open to all students in grades 9-12. This course teaches basic music fundamentals including reading rhythms, clefs, scales, intervals, keys and elementary harmony. This course will also prepare students to analyze the basic melodic and harmonic structure of music and to apply this knowledge to articulate and interpret their own musical ideas in compositional form. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as use Finale and Garage Band to enhance their skills in composition. Nightly homework should be expected. 813

ORCHESTRA STRINGS C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: Ability to play a string instrument Full Year This course is elective in the performing arts department open to string students in grades 9-12. Intermediate to advanced proficiency is expected of each player. Students in Orchestra Strings will rehearse and perform significant works from the orchestral repertoire in preparation for school concerts. Members of the class are highly encouraged to study their instrument with a qualified instructor outside of school. All performances and dress rehearsals are mandatory. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as record themselves for evaluation. In addition, students will perform individual playing assessments and written responses to listening examples. 814

STRING ENSEMBLE H 5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: Audition Full Year The String Ensemble will be auditioned among high school students and incoming freshmen the spring of the previous year. This ensemble also makes up the personnel of the string section for the Symphony Orchestra. Students in the String Ensemble will rehearse and perform their own music as well the repertoire of the String Orchestra. Because of the difficult nature of the ensemble repertoire, all members of the String Ensemble are highly encouraged to study their instrument with a qualified instructor outside of school. All performances and dress rehearsals are mandatory. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as record themselves for evaluation. In addition, String Ensemble students will perform individual playing assessments and written responses to listening examples. 39

820

CHAMBER SINGERS H 5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: Audition Full Year Chamber Singers performs mixed voice choral music from a variety of genres, eras, and cultures. Chamber Singers will be auditioned among high school students and incoming freshmen the spring of the previous year. Because of the difficult nature of the ensemble repertoire, all members of Chamber Singers are strongly encouraged to study with a qualified instructor outside of school. Students enrolled in Chamber Singers will become knowledgeable of their particular vocal range and vocal scores, as well as a basic understanding of the piano keyboard. Instruction in the fundamentals of sight-reading, interval and key signature identification, active listening, and music vocabulary is stressed. All performances, rehearsals, and dress rehearsals are mandatory. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as record themselves for evaluation. In addition, Chamber Singers students will perform individual performance assessments, written responses to listening examples, and prepare the solo audition piece for the Northeast District Festival for teacher evaluation. 822

TREBLE CHOIR H 5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: Audition Full Year Treble Choir performs choral music from a variety of genres, eras, and cultures, specifically written for treble voices. Treble Choir will be auditioned among high school students and incoming freshmen the spring of the previous year. Because of the difficult nature of the ensemble repertoire, all members of the Treble Choir are strongly encouraged to study with a qualified instructor outside of school. Students enrolled in Treble Choir will become knowledgeable of their particular vocal range and vocal scores, as well as a basic understanding of the piano keyboard. Instruction in the fundamentals of sight-reading, interval and key signature identification, active listening, and music vocabulary is stressed. All performances, rehearsals, and dress rehearsals are mandatory. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as record themselves for evaluation. In addition, Treble Choir students will perform individual performance assessments, written responses to listening examples, and prepare the solo audition piece for the Northeast District Festival for teacher evaluation. 831

CHORALE C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: None Full Year Chorale will rehearse and perform a broad spectrum of choral music from a variety of genres, eras, and cultures in preparation for school concerts and other public performances. Members of Chorale are encouraged to study with a qualified instructor outside of school. Students enrolled in Chorale will become knowledgeable of their particular vocal range as well as a basic understanding of the piano keyboard and the SATB vocal score. All performances and dress rehearsals are mandatory. Instruction in the fundamentals of sight-reading, melodic and rhythmic dictation, interval and key signature identification and music vocabulary is covered. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as record themselves for evaluation. In addition, students will perform individual playing assessments and written responses to listening examples. 851

MUSIC THEORY & COMPOSITION II H 2.5 credits Grade- All - Semester Prerequisite: Music Theory I or by Permission of Instructor Students enrolled in Music Theory & Composition II will expand their knowledge of basic theory and modes of music analysis. The main emphasis will be on four-part chorale-style writing to learn advanced harmony, modulation and other compositional styles. Students will also develop aural skills through dictation work and sight singing using solfege syllables and note names. Students enrolled in Music Theory and Composition II will complete a minimum of one compositional project per term, 40

accompanied by a written evaluation of their project. Students will use the music computer lab to research and listen to music as well as use Finale and Garage Band to enhance their skills in composition. Students who successfully complete this course will be adequately prepared to enter college as a music major. Nightly homework should be expected. 852

AP MUSIC THEORY AP 5 credits Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Music Theory and Composition I & II or the equivalent Full Year This is a comprehensive course designed for students who desire to pursue music as a career and study at the college level. This course will include the study of melodic and harmonic language, structure and form. Students will also develop aural skills through dictation work and sight singing using solfege syllables and note names. Nightly homework should be expected. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 855

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: None Semester Introduction to Theatre is an elective for students in grades 9-12 interested in the study of theatre. All aspects of drama will be explored, including acting and production. Students will do extensive scene study, character analysis, monologue execution and will learn proper performance techniques. In addition, students will study the philosophies of acting theorist Stanislavski, and the history of theatre from Greek Drama to Modern American Drama. Theatre terminology will be stressed. Several performance-level projects will be delivered at the end of the second semester. It is recommended that all students enroll in the Wakefield High School Theatre Arts productions to supplement class work. Nightly homework should be expected. 856

ADVANCED TOPICS IN THEATRE C 2.5 credits Grade- All Prerequisite: Introduction to Theatre or permission of instructor Semester This course is an extension of Introduction to Theatre and is intended for students who plan on majoring or minoring in theatre at the collegiate level. Emphasis is placed on the audition process. Each student will prepare multiple performance pieces for evaluation. In addition, students will execute advanced scene studies to be performed at the end of second semester. Review of topic from Introduction to Theatre will also be included. . It is recommended that all students enroll in the Wakefield High School Theatre Arts productions to supplement class-work. Nightly homework should be expected.

SCIENCE Familiarity with the important discoveries of science and facility with its method of inquiry are essential parts of what make us effective workers and informed citizens today. More and more skilled work stems from those discoveries and employs the techniques and skills we practice and develop in science courses. The graduation requirement at Wakefield Memorial High School is successful completion of three years (15 credits) of science, plus a passing score on a MCAS science test. Most college programs and many vocational programs require completion of at least two years of natural science course work which includes a lab. Those programs also commonly expect enrolled students to have completed three or four years of high school science courses which have included lab work. So that all our students can meet these requirements and face these challenges, the Wakefield Memorial High School science department recommends they complete four years of natural science courses, including Introduction to the Physical & Life Sciences, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Science has a direct correlation to math, so to determine the appropriate science class will depend on the completed and/or concurrent math 41

classes. Students seeking Advanced Placement courses should consult with their current teacher to discuss the appropriateness of the selections. The Science Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student utilizes critical thinking skills to solve problems both individually and collaboratively.

College Prep 9 10

Biology Chemistry

11

Chemistry Modern Physics Conceptual Physics Anatomy & Physiology Oceanography Astronomy Modern Physics Conceptual Physics Anatomy & Physiology Oceanography Astronomy

12

AP & Honors Honors Biology Honors Biology Honors Chemistry Honors Chemistry Honors Genetics/Microbiology AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Physics 1 AP Environmental Science Honors Genetics/Microbiology AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Physics C Mechanics AP Physics 1 AP Environmental Science

BIOLOGY C 5 credits – lab science Full Year Grade 9 Prerequisite: Quantitative and measurement skills listed below This course is a fast paced college preparatory course designed to fulfill the Massachusetts biology high school learning standards and to prepare students for the MCAS Biology test. According to the state standards, “Students are expected to enter their high school biology course with many of the quantitative and measurement skills that they will need to succeed.” These include:  construct and use tables and graphs to interpret data sets,  understand the appropriate use of line vs. bar graphs,  use the metric/standard international (SI) system,  convert within a unit (such as centimeters to meters),  use common prefixes such as milli-, centi-, and kilo-,  measure with accuracy and precision (length, volume, mass, temperature, etc.) As scientific investigation and laboratory activities are an integral part of the biology curriculum, it is assumed the entering student has some familiarity with formulating and testing hypotheses and in designing a controlled experiment. The concept of evolution is the basis for understanding biology and is the unifying theme of this course. Topics include organisms and animals live and survive, reproduce and pass on traits, and how populations evolve and adapt to their environment. The following levels of organization are examined: organic molecules, cells, organ systems, organisms, and populations, and ecosystems. 421

42

422

HONORS BIOLOGY H 5 credits - lab science Full Year Grade 9 Prerequisite: It is strongly suggested that students follow the recommendation of their previous science teacher when choosing this class. Students must be enrolled in Algebra 1 or Geometry concurrently. This biology class has been developed for academically strong students who are truly interested in sciences. Topics include evolution, biochemistry, levels of organization from cells to biomes, photosynthesis, cell respiration, genetics and biotechnology. Plant and animal systems will be explored in detail. Students are expected to work at an accelerated pace and will have homework, which includes reading the text and studying for quizzes and tests, due at every class. Students electing Honors Biology should have reading and math skills higher than grade level. They will be encouraged to pose questions, state hypotheses, and design and complete experiments. Students will gain experience in following replicable laboratory exercises in order to practice laboratory techniques. Students should be able to construct and use tables and graphs to interpret data sets, use the metric system, and measure with accuracy and precision. 431

CHEMISTRY C 5 credits - lab science Grades 10, 11, & 12 Prerequisite: Completed Algebra I, & Biology Full Year The emphasis in this study of chemistry is the development of scientific concepts relating to the structure of matter, the nature of gases, liquids, solids and their interaction. Stoichemistry, chemical equilibrium, and acids and bases will also be presented. Students will perform laboratory experiments that support topics presented in the classroom. Teacher demonstrations will supplement classroom presentations. The periodic classification of elements is used as a basis for the study of certain families of substances. By infusing concept mastery, critical thinking, problem-solving and laboratory experimentation strands, this course both underpins and expands upon the facts, formulas, and principles of chemistry. 432

HONORS CHEMISTRY H 5 credit - lab science Grades 10 & 11 Full Year Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, & Biology completed, Algebra II concurrent. It is strongly suggested that students follow the recommendation of their previous science teacher when choosing this class. This chemistry class has been developed for students with academic strength and interest in the sciences. Students will be expected to build upon their prior knowledge of the scientific method to pose questions, state hypotheses, design experiments, and to revise their explanations of phenomena as new findings emerge. Students will also be expected to use their mathematical knowledge to interpret data, construct graphs, perform conversions, and use scientific notation. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of general principles and the application of these principles to substances and the changes they undergo. Topics will include the structure of matter (atomic structure and electron configurations), states of matter (solids, liquids, and gases), chemical bonding, equilibrium and rates of reactions, acids and bases, and oxidation/reduction chemistry. In addition, the mathematical relationships integral to stoichiometry and thermochemistry will be explored in detail. Students should be prepared to work at an accelerated pace. 441

MODERN PHYSICS

C

5 credits - lab science

Grades 11 & 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Completed Biology, Chemistry, Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II (completed or concurrently with department signature(s)) This course is intended for those students who plan to enter a four-year college. Modern Physics is a presentation of the most significant concepts of physics. This course covers mechanics including 43

kinematics, dynamics and mechanical energy, and waves. Light and electromagnetism will be studied as time permits. Students will use Algebra I and II and Geometry to understand these physic concepts. Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory experimentation are used to develop the understanding of essential concepts. Application of the concepts to a wide variety of everyday phenomena is discussed. 442

CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS C 5 credits - lab science Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Completed Algebra I, Biology, & Chemistry Full Year Conceptual Physics is an introductory physics program which emphasizes labs, activities, and projects as the means to learn the major concepts of physics. The students will be engaged in these labs, activities and projects during approximately %50 of the classes. Students having a mathematical background which includes Algebra 1 and graphing should be sufficiently prepared to handle the problem solving and lab analysis that is part of this course. Course content consists of two major units: mechanics (motion, forces, and energy) and waves (light and sound). 5 credits – lab science Grade 11 & 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II (completed or concurrently), Biology & Chemistry This course is designed to provide science-oriented students with an introduction to two major topics in biology. One semester will be spent studying human inheritance. Emphasis will be placed on modes of inheritance, pedigrees, genetic errors, current research, cancer and stem cells. Students will cross Drosophila melanogaster in order to apply lecture topics. The second semester of this course will transition into microbiology. This will be a laboratory intensive semester where students will learn common microbiology techniques. The course will include a lab final in place of a written exam. Emphasis will be placed on how microbes affect human life both positively and negatively. Both semesters will examine where the scientific community stands today, where it may be heading in the future, and the implications of scientific research for society as a whole. 446

HONORS GENETICS/MICROBIOLOGY

H

447

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Prerequisite: Biology & Chemistry

C

5 credits - lab science Grades 11& 12 Full Year Human Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the structure and function of the human body. All body systems are examined with emphasis on the nervous, skeletal, muscular and circulatory systems. Diseases of each system are investigated in order to better understand normal functioning. The laboratory portion of this course includes microscopic observations, dissections and biochemical experiments. While being of special value to those students contemplating careers in medical or related fields, the course is of interest to all students who desire accurate and up-to-date information about the human body and its systems. 451 ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY

AP 6 credit-lab science

Grades 11&12 Full Year Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II (completed or concurrently), Biology & Chemistry, & Physics (completed or concurrent) AP Biology is a rigorous academic curriculum with a strong focus on depth of understanding, scientific inquiry, and reasoning skills. Students should be prepared to work at a college level.

44

Biology varies greatly in scale, from the study of ecosystems, to the study of the molecular underpinning of living organisms. Throughout the year we will focus each unit through the lens of the “Four Big Ideas.”  The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.  Biological systems utilize energy and molecular building blocks to grow, reproduce, and maintain homeostasis.  Living systems retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes.  Biological systems interact, and these interactions possess complex properties. These unifying themes contribute to the intellectual richness of the subject, as well as providing a powerful tool to guide our investigation of the living world. The ability to grasp science as a process is essential to conceptual understanding. Students will be expected to analyze and evaluate evidence in order to construct testable explanations. The laboratory component of the class will be inquiry based and student directed labs, as much as possible. Besides the textbook, selected scientific research material will also be required reading. Independent work is an integral part of the learning process. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 452 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY AP 6 credits - lab science

Grades 11 & 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II (completed or concurrently), Biology & Chemistry, & Physics (completed or concurrent) The Advanced Placement Chemistry course will explore the areas of inorganic chemistry in great detail and represents a complete freshman level college course in chemistry. A sampling of topics begins with measurement and mathematical concepts. Atoms, molecules, ions, chemical formulas and equations and many other areas of chemistry including bonding and reaction will be covered. The laboratory part of this course will involve qualitative and quantitative work using a variety of instruments. A small sampling of experiments includes such activities as the determination of molecular mass, the determination of reaction rates, acid-base titration, calorimetry, and determination of the formula of a compound. A specific bound laboratory notebook must be purchased in class on the first couple of day of school. Any financial hardship, please discuss directly with the teacher and accommodations will be arranged. There will be a great deal of mathematics in the course. Students planning to elect this course should be prepared to work at the college level. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. Successful completion of the Advanced Placement Exam will allow the student to omit first year chemistry in colleges that accept AP exam grades for advanced placement, but more importantly, successful completion of the AP Chemistry course will result in an in-depth appreciation of the composition, structure, and properties of matter and the reactions they undergo. 453

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C AP 6 credits - lab science Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry & Modern or Honors Physics, Grade 12 AP Calculus in Senior Year Full Year The Advanced Placement Physics Course covers the material given on the calculus based “Mechanics” portion of the AP Physics “C” test. A rigorous treatment of mechanics is presented covering the major aspects of kinematics, dynamics, force, work-energy, rotational motion and harmonic motion. Laboratory exercises demonstrate, and supplement, the formal text material, investigating such topics as motion (linear, rotational and simple harmonic), force and energy. Additional topics related to electricity and magnetism will be presented as time permits. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 45

6 credits – lab science Grades 11 & 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus (completed or concurrently), Biology & Chemistry Advanced Placement Physics 1 is a full year algebra-based physics course that is equivalent to a firstsemester college course in physics. AP Physics 1 covers the content and depth of the previous Honors Physics course and allows the option of taking the AP Physics 1 exam at course conclusion. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. Students will be expected to use their knowledge of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry to understand the content, solve problems, construct graphs, and interpret data. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments will be used to develop a mastery of physics concepts. The AP Physics 1 course provides a foundation in physics and strong problems solving skills for students pursuing careers in the life sciences, applied sciences, and other fields not directly related to science. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 454

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS 1

AP

455 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

6 credit - lab science Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry and Algebra 1 Full Year The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The following themes provide a foundation for the structure of the AP Environmental Science course. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 1. Science is a process.  Science is a method of learning more about the world.  Science constantly changes the way we understand the world. 2. Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes.  Energy cannot be created; it must come from somewhere.  As energy flows through systems, at each step more of it becomes unusable. 3. The Earth itself is one interconnected system.  Natural systems change over time and space.  Biogeochemical systems vary in ability to recover from disturbances. 4. Humans alter natural systems.  Humans have had an impact on the environment for millions of years.  Technology and population growth have enabled humans to increase both the rate and scale of their impact on the environment. 5. Environmental problems have a cultural and social context.  Understanding the role of cultural, social, and economic factors is vital to the development of solutions. 6. Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.  A suitable combination of conservation and development is required.  Management of common resources is essential. 46

AP

474

OCEANOGRAPHY C 2.5 credits - non lab course Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Completed Biology Semester Students in this course will learn a variety of topics related to essential principles and fundamental concepts in oceanography. Major scientific principles that apply to the areas of chemical, physical and biological oceanography are included in this course. The ocean as a major influence on weather and climate which makes Earth habitable will be studied. The interconnectedness of the ocean and humans as it affects life will be explored. Knowledge of the kind and of the habits of marine plants and animals will be gained. This course is intended for students who have an interest in oceanography and who wish to take additional science topics. Students should expect components of hands-on activities, laboratory experiments, as well as homework, term projects, quizzes and tests in this class. Field trips are included in the course. 475

ASTRONOMY C 2.5 credits - non lab course Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Completed Biology Semester This course will take a descriptive look at the skies, the solar system, and the universe. Subjects studied include the earth, the moon, the sun, planets and their moons, stars, comets, asteroids, constellations, nebulae, space exploration. The composition, evolution, and movement of celestial bodies will be studies. An understanding of the nature of light is an important component of astronomy. Students that elect this course have an interest in astronomy and wish to take additional science courses. Completion of hands-on activities, model building, term projects as well as homework, tests, and quizzes are expected of students in this class. A field trip to a planetarium is included.

SOCIAL STUDIES The Social Studies comprise the area of human knowledge and experience that pertains to man as a social being. It leads the student to a greater understanding of how historical forces, environmental factors, political institutions and the accumulation of human experience through the centuries have combined to produce the kind of society in which we now live. This is essential background for intelligent citizenship. As a consequence, the Social Studies are critical to the survival of a democracy. Courses are designed to assist all students in their development of a self-identity toward the end of becoming contributing citizens. It should be noted that most schools and colleges offering post-high school programs of study require a minimum of one subject in this area and generally expect that two or three will have been completed as part of an applicant's high school preparation. Fifteen credits, including U. S. History 1 & 2, are required to graduate from Wakefield Memorial High School. All students must successfully complete the two year U.S. History sequence. The World History sequence begins at the eighth grade level and is continued freshman year. That sequence is followed by the twoyear U.S. History sequence beginning sophomore year. Both sequences are aligned with Massachusetts State Frameworks. There are a variety of electives for students to take during their junior and senior years as well. Students seeking placement in Honors and/or Advanced Placement courses must consult with their current teacher to discuss the appropriateness of the selection. The Social Studies Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student communicates effectively in a variety of forms.

47

College World History 2 US History 1 US History 2 Sociology Cultural Studies Holocaust & World Affairs Sociology Cultural Studies Holocaust & World Affairs Justice & Criminology Psychology

9 10 11

12

  

Honors World History 2 - Honors US History 1 - Honors US History 2 - Honors

Advanced Placement

AP US History

AP US History AP Government

All Freshman must elect the World History 2 All Sophomores must elect U.S. History 1 All Juniors must elect U.S. History 2 or AP US History

221

WORLD HISTORY 2 C 5 credits Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Full Year The 9th grade World History course will provide a rigorous, skills-focused, curriculum supported by Common Core State learning standards. The course will serve as a strong foundation in writing, research, and study skills that will benefit all WMHS students throughout their course of study. This course will begin with the Age of Enlightenment and the French Revolution. It will continue with the Congress of Vienna and trace the development of modern nations, the relationships of western and nonwestern cultures through imperialism, the evolution and challenge of democracy, totalitarianism, and the economic, social, and political institutions of the modern world. Time will be spent briefly discussing the development of the United States starting with the U.S. Constitution and continuing with the Civil War and U.S. involvement in 20th century affairs including World War I, the Depression, World War II, the Cold War, as well as the Korean and Vietnam Wars and post-war conflicts. This course will emphasize a wide range of skill development throughout the year including a focus a critical thinking skills, reading comprehension, writing to text, essay writing, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. 229

WORLD HISTORY 2 - HONORS H 5 credits Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Full Year The 9th grade World History course will provide a rigorous, skills-focused, curriculum supported by Common Core State learning standards. The course will serve as a strong foundation in writing, research, and study skills that will benefit all WMHS students throughout their course of study. Beginning with the Age of Enlightenment, this course will combine and discuss chronological and thematic approaches to the study of world history. It will also focus on the development and emergence of modern nations examining their social, political, and economic institutions. Western and non-western cultures will be compared, contrasted and discussed. Time will also be spent briefly examining the United States starting with the U. S. Constitution and continuing with the Civil War and U.S. involvement in 20th century affairs including World War I, the Depression, World War II, and beyond. Because this is an Honors class, it is expected that the students will be entering the class with a solid grasp of critical thinking, reading, essay writing, writing to text, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. These skills will then be enhanced and refined throughout the course at a rigorous pace in preparation for future Honors and Advanced Placement 48

classes. A minimum of two major research assignments will be conducted throughout the course of the year. It is strongly suggested that students follow the recommendation of their eighth grade teacher when choosing this class. 231

UNITED STATES HISTORY 1 C 5 credits Grade 10 Prerequisite: None Full Year In coordination with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and supported by Common Core State learning standards United States History I will provide a rigorous, skills-focused, curriculum that focuses on the first half of United States development. This course starts with a review of the period of European exploration to the Americas and the foundations of American Colonial societies. This course begins in 1763 with the end of the French and Indian War and continues until the end of Reconstruction in 1877. All major primary source documents and skills recommended by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for this time period will be covered in the class in an effort to prepare students for an assessment test, set to be administered at the end of United States History II in the spring of the students' junior year. Because this is a college preparatory class, an emphasis will be placed on the development of critical thinking skills, reading, essay writing, writing to text, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. A minimum of one major research assignment will be conducted throughout the course year. 232

UNITED STATES HISTORY AP AP 5 credits Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: None Full Year This is a highly intensive class taught at the college level. The major skills developed over the course of the year will be lecture-note taking, primary and secondary source analysis and evaluation, discussion, college level research, and varying formats of essay writing. The curriculum covered will reflect the major periods and themes of American History following the Civil War up to the present. A comprehensive review of U.S. History I and II will be given before the Advanced Placement exam scheduled for May. Students electing this class are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam, and will be given a summer assignment in the spring of the previous school year. The grading reflects most college classes, making exams and research assignments heavily weighted. Because this is an Advanced Placement class, it is expected that the students will be entering the class with an expert grasp of critical thinking, reading, essay writing, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. These skills will be regularly utilized throughout the course at a rigorous pace in preparation for college/university level work. Additionally, test preparation and the AP exam format will be a focus of instruction throughout the course year. It is strongly suggested that students follow the recommendation of their sophomore teacher when choosing this class. 233

UNITED STATES HISTORY 1 - HONORS H 5 credits Grade - 10 Prerequisite: None Full Year In coordination with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and supported by Common Core State learning standards United States History I Honors will provide a rigorous, skills-focused, curriculum that focuses on the first half of United States development. This course starts with a review of the period of European exploration to the Americas and the foundations of American Colonial societies. This course begins in 1763 with the end of the French and Indian War and continues until the end of Reconstruction in 1877. All major primary source documents and skills recommended by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for this time period will be covered in the class in an effort to prepare students for an assessment test, set to be administered at the end of United States History II in the spring of the students' junior year. Because this is an Honors class, it is expected that the students will be entering the class with a solid grasp of critical thinking, reading, essay writing, writing to text, 49

note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. These skills will then be enhanced and refined throughout the course at a rigorous pace in preparation for future Honors and Advanced Placement classes. A minimum of two major research assignments will be conducted throughout the course of the year. It is strongly suggested that students follow the recommendation of their freshman teacher when choosing this class. 234

UNITED STATES HISTORY 2 C 5 credits Grades 11 Prerequisite: None Full Year In coordination with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and supported by Common Core State learning standards United States History II will provide a rigorous, skills-focused, curriculum that focuses on the second half of United States development. This course starts with a review of the key preCivil War documents, events, and ideas and then engages in an in depth examination of the late nineteenth and all of the twentieth century. The goal of the course is to prepare students to become well informed, highly skilled, and dedicated citizens with an appreciation of our nation's heritage. By emphasizing the relationship between historical events and modern problems and institutions, students will learn to view contemporary America through the perspective of an historical evolution. Papers, readings, and videos form an integral part of this course. Because this is a college preparatory class, an emphasis will be placed on the development of critical thinking skills, reading, essay writing, writing to text, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. Along with a research paper, a minimum of one major research assignment will be conducted throughout the course year. 235

UNITED STATES HISTORY 2 - HONORS H 5 credits Grades 11 Prerequisite: None Full Year In coordination with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and supported by Common Core State learning standards United States History II Honors will provide a rigorous, skills-focused, curriculum that focuses on the first half of United States development., this course starts with a review of the key pre-Civil War documents, events, and ideas and then engages in an in depth examination of the late nineteenth and all of the twentieth century. The goal of the course is to prepare students to become well informed, highly skilled, and dedicated citizens with an appreciation of our nation's heritage. By emphasizing the relationship between historical events and modern problems and institutions, students will learn to view contemporary America through the perspective of an historical evolution. Papers, readings, and videos form an integral part of this course. Because this is an Honors class, it is expected that the students will be entering the class with a solid grasp of critical thinking, reading, essay writing, writing to text, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. These skills will then be enhanced and refined throughout the course at a rigorous pace in preparation for future Honors and Advanced Placement classes. A minimum of two major research assignments, one of which will be a research paper, will be conducted throughout the course of the year. It is strongly suggested that students follow the recommendation of their freshman teacher when choosing this class. 240

CULTURAL STUDIES C 5 credits Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: None Full Year Cultural Studies is a full year junior/senior elective course designed to trace the history and impact of African-Americans, Asian-Americans and Latino-Americans’ impact on the history and culture of the United States. Starting in the colonial era and following through to modern times each group’s unique history, art, literature, music, cuisine and styles have been blended into the overall fabric of American culture. This course trace those impacts related to American history and popular culture. This course will also examine the tribal origins of African-American in addition to the slave trade through to civil 50

rights era, the Asian-American connection to the expanding “Wild West” and gold rush ear, plus the impact of Latin culture in Southwestern United States during war through to modern political questions of immigration. 242

SOCIOLOGY C 5 credits Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: None Semester This course will focus on providing students with a basic understanding of sociological concepts and methods. Of particular interest will be the development of the Sociological Imagination, the various and competing Sociological Perspectives and their application to an analysis of various types of societies. Within that context, issues relating to religion, government, poverty, race, crime, class as well as a variety of other topics may be covered. Since this is a college preparatory class, an emphasis will be placed on the development of a wide-range of historical thinking skills including critical thinking skills, reading comprehension, essay writing, writing to text, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. Students enrolled in this course will be required to utilize an online textbook with supplemental materials and activities for homework assignments. If a student does not have internet access after school hours, a hardcopy of the course materials will be provided by the teacher. 244

HOLOCAUST & WORLD AFFAIRS C 5 credits Grade: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: None Full Year In this elective hybrid course students will begin the first semester examining the causes and effects of the Holocaust. Topics include but are not limited to historical origins of anti-Semitism, rise of the Hitler and Nazis, racial ideology of the Nazis, process of the Holocaust and resistance movements as well as liberation. A variety of different resources such as lecture notes, primary source readings, videos, survivor testimonies as well as feature films will provide students with an in depth look at both the victims and perpetrators of what is the most infamous and single worst act of genocide in recorded human history. During the second semester students will analyze 20th and 21st century events (some as they unfold) that have and continue to shape both the World and United States. Topics include but are not limited to the terror attacks of 9/11 and subsequent US War on Terror, genocides and human rights violations of the late 20th and 21st centuries, Economic Crisis, Democratic movements and revolutions around the world as well as newly developing events that affect both the US and the World. Because this hybrid course is a college preparatory class, an emphasis will be placed on the development of a wide-range of historical thinking skills including critical thinking skills, reading comprehension, essay writing, note taking, writing to text and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. 246

JUSTICE & CRIMINOLOGY C 5 credits Grade - 12 Prerequisite: None Full Year This course is directed toward the understanding of student rights and responsibilities and the judicial process. It will help to give the student a realistic comprehension of our legal system. Emphasis will be placed on preparing the young adult, through an analytical study of law, to make decisions affecting his everyday life. Topics to be covered include crime, consumer contracts, tort actions, domestic relations, property rights, judicial decision-making, individual rights, law enforcement and penology. Class topics are keyed to and focus upon current events and legal issues, which develop in our day to day experience. Mock trials and role playing exercises are a significant part of the curriculum as are guest speakers including local police officers. Because this is a college preparatory class, an emphasis will be placed on the development of a wide-range of historical thinking skills including critical thinking skills, reading, 51

essay writing, writing to text, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. 250

PSYCHOLOGY C 5 credits Grade - 12 Prerequisite: None Full Year This is an introductory course in studying all aspects of human behavior. Sample topics are: How does personality develop? What do your dreams really mean? What are some of the better methods to handle stress and anxiety? What are the effective techniques of building self-esteem? How does someone develop psychological disorders? The textbook is supplemented to include such current issues as: child abuse and family violence, cults, suicide, addictive personalities and violence. Movies are viewed for case studies and for examples of psychological principles. Guest speakers, small and large group discussions, surveys, current research readings and taking personality tests are all part of the variety of things the students will experience in this class. Because this is a college preparatory class, an emphasis will be placed on the development of a wide-range of historical thinking skills including critical thinking skills, reading, essay writing, writing to text, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. 264

AP GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS AP 5 credits Grade 12 Prerequisite: None Full Year This Advanced Placement course in American Government and Politics is designed for academically advanced seniors. It is intended to give students a critical perspective on politics and government in the United States and involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also stresses familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up American political reality. Students electing this class will be given a summer assignment in the spring of the previous school year. Also, it is expected that students will spend time outside of class researching various media outlets for current events relating to government and politics in order to participate in class discussions. Because this is an Advanced Placement class, it is expected that the students will be entering the class with an expert grasp of critical thinking, reading, essay writing, note taking, and research skills as well as time management and organizational skills. These skills will be regularly utilized throughout the course at a rigorous pace in preparation for college/university level work in the field of government and politics. Additionally, test preparation and the AP Exam format will be a focus of instruction throughout the course of the year. It is strongly suggested that students follow the recommendation of their junior teacher when choosing this class. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May.

TELEVISION PRODUCTION The main goal in Television Production classes is education, not entertainment. Through sequential learning, students receive instruction in the basic foundations of television production with a strong emphasis on respect for equipment, teamwork, creativity and organizational skills. WHSTV, operated by the Visual Arts Department, is Wakefield’s educational channel used to showcase student achievements by cable casting original student productions, and extra-curricular events. The Channel is run by a student board of directors, and students in the TV Production courses create the programming seen on WHSTV. The Visual Arts Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student creates new and innovative ideas based on acquired knowledge and critical thinking skills. 52

College Preparatory 9 10 11 12

Honors

Introduction to Film and Video Film Studies and Media Literacy Introduction to Film and Video Intermediate Video Production Introduction to Film and Video Intermediate Video Production Introduction to Film and Video Intermediate Video Production

Advanced Video Production Video Production Portfolio Advanced Video Production Video Production Portfolio

681 INTRODUCTION TO FILM & VIDEO C 5 credits Grades: All Prerequisite: None Full Year Introduction to Film and Video teaches the theory of video and filmmaking. Students will be taught conceptualization, visualization, story structure, cinematography, sound recording, camera technique, non-linear editing, along with a strong emphasis on media literacy. During this exciting and dynamic class, students will receive expert hands-on training. Introduction to Film and Video is a prerequisite for all TV courses. 682 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO PRODUCTION C 5 credits Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Introduction to Film and Video Full Year In Intermediate Video Production, students will become proficient in the skills required to produce more complex works of media. Students will learn advanced non-linear editing, manual operation of the camera, audio acquisition, advanced lighting techniques and lens theory. Students will demonstrate hands-on expertise upon successful completion of this course. Students may take Intermediate Video Production upon completion of Introduction to Film and Video. 683 ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION H 5 credits Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Intermediate Video Production Full Year In Advanced Video Production, students are expected to demonstrate all previously learned technical skills from prior video production courses. Students will be expected to develop their personal voices as a producer. With an emphasis on longer formats, students will learn the importance of meeting deadlines, proper pre-production planning, designing an effective shooting schedule, conducting indepth research and coordinating interviews. After hours work is required to meet course objectives. Students may take Advanced Video Production upon completion of Intermediate Video Production. 684 VIDEO PRODUCTION PORTFOLIO H 5 credits Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Video Production Full Year Video Production Portfolio is the final television production course offered at Wakefield Memorial High School in the Visual Arts Department. This course is designed to prepare the student for success in media classes in college or the field of video production. Students will build a portfolio of modern media examples designed to create a strong body of work that will assist in either acceptance in communications programs, or to prepare them for work in the production field. 685 FILM STUDIES & MEDIA LITERACY C 5 credits Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: None Full Year Film Studies is an introduction to the basic principles of film aesthetics such as mis-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound. Students will also be introduced to a historical context in which 53

films were created. The course aims to provide students with the ability to understand what films mean, and how directors convey their thoughts cinematically. Media Literacy is the ability to access and analyze various forms of media. In this course we will deconstruct media content from a wide variety of sources such as photographs, newspaper articles, advertisements, television, movies, documentaries, and websites. During the course, students will develop an understanding of how this media influences us and how we in turn can influence others.

VISUAL ARTS The Visual Arts Department successfully prepares students for college and careers, as well as provides an avenue for all students, regardless of talent, to express their individuality and creativity. The Visual Arts Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student creates new and innovative ideas based on acquired knowledge and critical thinking skills. College Preparatory 9 10

11

Honors

Studio Art 1 Studio Art 1 Studio Art 2 Ceramics 1 Studio Art 1 Studio Art 2 Ceramics 1 Ceramics 2 Digital Photography

12

Studio Art 1 Studio Art 2 Ceramics 2 Digital Photography Photography

9 - 12

Studio Art 1 Multimedia Presentation

Graphic Design H Drawing and Painting and H Illustration H

Graphic Design H Drawing and Painting H Illustration H

517

AP Studio Art: 2D Design AP Studio Art: 3D Design AP Studio Art: Drawing AP Studio Art: 2D Design AP Studio Art: 3D Design AP Studio Art: Drawing

MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATIONS C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: None Full Year Multimedia students develop images, presentations and animations using Adobe Photoshop and Macromedia Flash. Students gain experience in planning, developing, creating and presenting projects to the class. This course incorporates the elements of art to allow students the ability to develop artistically while using computer technology.

54

628

STUDIO ART 1 C 5 Credits Grades- All Prerequisite: None Full Year Studio Art 1 is a prerequisite for most art courses. Art 1 students learn the basic principles of art. Emphasis is on learning how to use a variety of drawing media to complete projects including portraiture, figure drawing, calligraphy, one point perspective, still life drawing, design and composition. Two and three dimensional design projects include painting, printmaking, and paper maché. Students will develop productive studio habits, creativity, craftsmanship, self-discipline and respect. There is strong emphasis on the introduction, understanding and correct use of the basic elements of art. 630

STUDIO ART 2 C 5 Credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 Full Year Studio Art 2 provides opportunities for more advanced applications of the basic elements of art and principles of design. Divided into four segments, each term concentrates on a different area of studio art, including: drawing, painting, printmaking and three-dimensional design. Students demonstrate a higher level of skill, deal with more complex assignments, and respond to works of art in more sophisticated ways. 640 CERAMICS 1 C 5 Credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: None Full Year Ceramics emphasizes the functional and non-functional aspects of clay. Both hand built and wheelthrown techniques will be introduced. Glazing techniques are practiced and integrated to complete an aesthetic form. There is a strong emphasis on developing productive studio habits, creative design, understanding of material, good craftsmanship and participation in class critiques. 642

CERAMICS 2 C 5 credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 Full Year Ceramics 2 is designed for students who have completed Ceramics 1 and want to perfect or refine their abilities. Wheelwork and hand building techniques will be more rigorous and more challenging projects will be given. New techniques will be introduced and applied both with clay as well as glazing techniques. 643

GRAPHIC DESIGN H 5 Credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 & Art 2 or Intro to Film and Video & Intermediate Video Production Full Year Graphic Design emphasizes the artistic and technical skills needed to communicate through a visual and commercial medium. Assignments focus on the study of letterform, graphics, image editing and communication to produce artwork. Students build excellent skills and function as designers capable of creating college level and/or professional quality graphic products. Each student develops a portfolio using the Adobe Creative Suite. This honors level course moves quickly and efficiently through the tools and programs used in the course and relies heavily on excellent time management. Students must use their class time to their full potential and schedule time outside of class to complete their projects successfully. This full year course is offered to students in grades 11 & 12 who have successfully completed Art 1 & 2 or TV1 & 2 and who have the recommendation of their prerequisite teacher(s). 655

PHOTOGRAPHY C 2.5 Credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 & Art 2 or Introduction to Film and Video & Intermediate Video Production Semester Photography students use black and white film and 35mm cameras to learn proper film exposure with natural lighting. In the darkroom, students focus on the fundamentals of developing film and printing 55

using photographic paper. Emphasis is placed on students' ability to select interesting and meaningful photographic compositions. Students must supply their own 35mm adjustable lens camera. 659

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY C 2.5 Credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 & Art 2 or Introduction to Film and Video & Intermediate Video Production Semester Digital photography students combine the art of still digital photography with image manipulation using digital cameras, scanners, and Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn various techniques to modify, enhance, combine and transform images. Computers will be the primary tool for image manipulation and processing. Students who enroll must have access to a digital camera. Students will acquire images outside of school through weekly homework assignments. 637

DRAWING & PAINTING H 5 credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 & 2 Full Year Drawing & Painting students concentrate on the creative uses of the elements of art and the principles of design. Emphasis is on increasing powers of observation and developing the ability to organize the visual elements necessary to express and idea. This honors level course focuses heavily on time management, focus and effort during the class period as well as outside the class. A personal sketchbook is required with homework assignments based on observational drawing. Students work toward building their portfolios for college. This full year course is offered every other year, alternating with Illustration, to students in grades 11 and 12 who have successfully completed Art 1 & 2 and who have the recommendation of their prerequisite teacher(s). (Offered in 2016-2017) 653

ILLUSTRATION H 5 credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Art 1 & 2 Full Year Illustration students work to establish their own personal style through selective use of the elements of art and principles of design. Projects focus on developing the ability to express a point of view and show personal vision. Students use their powers of observation, abstraction, invention and expression with a variety of media, materials and techniques. This honors level course focuses heavily on time management, focus and effort during the class period as well as outside the class. A personal sketchbook is required with homework assignments based on observational drawing. Students work toward building their portfolios for college. This full year course is offered every other year, alternating with Honors Drawing & Painting, to students in grades 11 and 12 who have successfully completed Art 1 & 2 and who have the recommendation of their prerequisite teacher(s). (Not offered in 2016-2017). 638 AP Studio Art: 2D Design AP 5 credits Grade 11-12 639 AP Studio Art: 3D Design Full Year 641 AP Studio Art: Drawing Prerequisites and/or Concurrent Courses: Illustration, Drawing & Painting, Graphic Design Students will demonstrate a proficiency in a variety of two-dimensional, 3-dimensional or drawing techniques, respectively, while also maintaining a concentration under a particular concept or idea. Portfolio preparation is expected to occur during the summer prior to the school year as well as outside of class time. This full-year college-level Advanced Placement course emphasizes the development of an extensive portfolio that is sent to a national panel for judgment and grading on the AP scale in May. Students are expected to submit the AP Exam in May.

56

HEALTH AND LIFE SKILLS The Health and Life Skills Department focuses on increasing knowledge, developing skills, and connecting course content to real-life situations. As Health Educators, we are dedicated to helping students increase their overall health and level of success – both during and after high school. All courses offered include hands-on-learning and the integration of technology with the goal of engaging the student and enhancing their learning experience in the classroom. In addition, our courses offer opportunities for student to explore various careers. Health Issues is the only required course. Child Development and Foods and Nutrition are both electives that can be taken at any point during a student’s high school career. The Health and Life Skills Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student applies acquired knowledge and skills to new and/or real world contexts. Grade

Open

College Preparatory

9

Health Issues I

9-12

Health Issues II

Foods & Nutrition Child Development Foods & Nutrition Child Development Diversity Leaders

11-12 710

HEALTH ISSUES I O 1.25 credits Grade 9 Prerequisite: None Semester This course focuses on health issues that affect the everyday lives of teens. This course includes health knowledge along with skills that can be used to create and sustain healthy habits. Topics include stress management, substance abuse prevention, nutrition, human sexuality, time management, and relationships. Projects and activities in this class will build on writing, decision-making, and internet research. This course is a graduation requirement. 711

HEALTH ISSUES II C 5 credits Grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Health 9 Full Year This course is designed to build off of the skills and knowledge that students acquire in Health Issues 9. Topics introduced in Health Issues I will be explored at greater depth. This includes but is not limited to: substance abuse prevention, stress management, decision making, healthy relationships, nutrition, and sexuality. Students will also be introduced to social, emotional, and mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, and suicide. Students will acquire the skills to become more resilient in the face of stressful situations, and will learn coping mechanisms to deal with the stress of real-life situations they may experience in the near future. The goal of this course is to provide students with skills and knowledge that will help them lead healthy lives as they prepare to leave high school and enter into adulthood. 713

DIVERSITY LEADERS

C

5 credits

Grade 11 & 12 Full Year All students enrolled in this course are selected through a nomination, application, and interview process. The primary role of a Diversity Leader is to facilitate monthly activities in freshman and sophomore classes as part of our anti-bullying curriculum at Wakefield Memorial High School. This 57

course will provide students with an opportunity to make a positive impact on their school community. It will also provide students with excellent facilitation and presentation skills. The program is part of the Anti-Defamation League's "A World Of Difference" peer leadership program. In addition to facilitating classroom activities, Diversity Leaders sponsor school-wide events to celebrate and promote diversity in our community. The mission of the Diversity Leader program is to reduce stereotyping and prejudice, increase awareness of the effects of bullying and cyberbullying, and increase acceptance of individual differences. 715

CHILD DEVELOPMENT C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: None Full Year This course studies the physical, emotional, social and intellectual development of the young child from birth to age nine. This class is ideal for any student who currently babysits, has young siblings, or is thinking about becoming a daycare provider or teacher. The class is also an excellent option for students interested in working with children or families in any medical profession. Stages of pregnancy, prenatal development, parenting, and various health issues will also be covered. An optional teen pregnancy prevention project involving a computerized baby doll will be offered to students. Along with the textbook, the course will include guest speakers, internet projects, interactive class activities, and elementary school visits. 718

FOODS AND NUTRITION C 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: None Full Year This course emphasizes skills and knowledge necessary for life in the twenty-first century by orienting students to basic skills and concepts of food preparation and nutrition. Areas of study include food safety and sanitation, utilization and manipulation of recipes, the USDA My Plate Guidelines, meal planning, and consumer education. Food laboratories include the preparation of basic foods and simple main dishes for students to complete and sample. The course is comprised of various projects and learning experiences that integrate problem solving, math skills, and science concepts.

WELLNESS The mission of the Wellness Program at Wakefield Memorial High School is to assist students in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains of learning so that they become lifelong movers and learners. Students are constantly challenged by physical and mental tasks which include fitness testing, developing game-like strategies, written tests, worksheets, class discussions, and attempting a new sport and/or skill. Students are able to utilize both indoor and outdoor facilities to enhance their experience at WMHS including places in the community such as Breakheart Reservation. After having four semesters of Wellness, students will have the skills and knowledge necessary to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle for a lifetime. The Wellness Department will assess the following academic competency from the school’s 21st Century Learning Expectations: The student applies acquired knowledge and skills to new and/or real world contexts. Grade 9

Open Personal Fitness

10

Project Adventure 58

11

Life Time Activities

12

Senior Wellness

931 PERSONAL FITNESS O 1.25 credits Grades 9-10 Personal Fitness focuses on health and skill-related components of fitness. Students will assess their fitness in areas of cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Students will then develop fitness goals based on their performance on their fitness tests. Students will also be introduced to the basic principles of weight training and apply it to a personal workout plan. Courses 931 and 940 are offered in alternating years to grades 9 and 10. (Offered in 2016-2017) 940 PROJECT ADVENTURE O 1.25 credits Grade 9-10 Project Adventure is a teambuilding based program with a focus on respect, trust, problem-solving, and positive communication. It develops responsible learners through active learning opportunities. Challenge by choice is the cornerstone philosophy of this program through engaging in activities outside of their comfort zone. Student will discover their strengths and weaknesses regarding leadership, problem-solving, communication, and accepting differences. Students are also introduced to the concept of learning in their “stretch zone”-indicating that is when learning takes place. Courses 931 and 940 are offered in alternating years to grades 9 and 10. (Not offered in 2016-2017) 941 LIFE TIME ACTIVITES O 1.25 credits Grade 11 The course will be delivered to juniors for one semester. Students will participate in lifetime activities. They will be introduced to the foundations of physical fitness and learn how to assess their muscular strength and endurance and understand their own personal cardiovascular performance capabilities. This course will provide the opportunity for students to develop skills necessary for participation in lifetime activities. Examination of students program retention will be applied both on a physical and mental basis. 951 SENIOR WELLNESS O 1.25 credits Grade 12 This course is a graduation requirement for all Seniors. Students are given the opportunity to explore and participate in a variety of lifetime activities using WMHS’s current fitness facilities (gymnastics room, weight room, fieldhouse, tennis courts, outdoor track, turf field, outdoor and community facilities such as Breakheart Reservation). Lifetime activities include hiking, walking, running, yoga, pilates, dance, basketball, frisbee golf, ultimate frisbee, archery, tennis, volleyball, weight training, and soccer. The goal is for students to find physical activities they enjoy and carry it out for a lifetime.

SPECIAL EDUCATION The Special Education Department provides for the needs of students with disabilities at Wakefield Memorial High School through identification, assessment and program development as required by both state and federal law. Special Education students are serviced through Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) which are developed to meet a student’s unique learning needs and assist the student in making effective academic progress. Each Special Education student is assigned a Special Education teacher who acts as a liaison, overseeing the development and implementation of the student’s IEP and monitoring progress. A student’s Team, including the student, teachers, guidance counselor and parents, 59

meet at least once a during the school year to review the student’s progress and develop a plan for future supports and services including transitional planning needs. A variety of supports and programming options are available through both special and general education classrooms. The course and program offerings that follow may only be selected upon recommendation of the IEP TEAM.

INTENSIVE SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOL TO LIFE Grades 9 – 12 Full Year The School to Life Program is a substantially separate program servicing students with relatively severe, low incidence disabilities. Instruction is provided in a small group or one-to-one setting. A student’s daily schedule is based on goals developed through the IEP process in a variety of focus areas including functional academics, social skills, vocational and pre-vocational training, as well as community experiences. Instruction reflects a systematic, multi-sensory approach. Academic subjects and curricula are modified according to individual abilities and goals, but are addressed in accordance with Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Opportunities for students to participate in less restrictive settings are available based on student readiness. P.O.S.T. PROGRAM Grades 9 – 12 and post-graduate Full Year The P.O.S.T. Program services students with moderate to severe disabilities who receive instruction in both inclusive and substantially separate settings according to their individual interests, abilities and goals. Within the P.O.S.T. classroom, small group and 1:1 instruction is provided based on goals developed through the IEP process in a variety of focus areas including functional academics, social skills, vocational and pre-vocational training, as well as community experiences. Academic subjects and curricula are modified according to individual abilities and goals, but are addressed in accordance with Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

INCLUSIVE CLASSES Inclusive classes at Wakefield Memorial High School are designed to provide increased support for special education students within the general education classroom. In inclusive classes, the general education teacher’s instruction is supported by a moderate special needs teacher or paraprofessional within the classroom. A wide variety of supports including curriculum modification can be delivered within the inclusive classroom. The specific type of inclusive support a student receives is determined through the Team process. Inclusion English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies classes are offered.

LEARNING SUPPORT CENTER (LSC) 962/966 ORGANIZATION & STUDY SKILLS LSC

0.25 credits per block, per year Grades All The Organizational and Study Skills Support Center is designed to support students in the development of improved organizational and study skills. Students are explicitly taught a number of different strategies and receive ongoing support in the application of these strategies to their academic assignments. 60

O

971 MATH LSC O 0.25 credits Grade All The Math Learning Support Center is designed for students who require specialized math instruction and re-teaching in a small-group learning environment. This course is designed to supplement the instruction received in the Co-Taught Math sequence and provide additional support for assignment completion. 972 READING/WRITING LSC O 0.25 credits Grade All The Reading/Writing Learning Support Center is designed for students who require specialized reading and/or writing instruction and re-teaching in a small-group learning environment. This course is designed to supplement the instruction provided in the Co-Taught English Language Arts sequence and provide additional support for assignment completion.

ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM The Alternative Program at Wakefield Memorial High School provides services for students with social, emotional, or behavioral challenges that impede learning in the traditional classroom setting. The program is therapeutically based with a low student to teacher ratio that allows for the needed support. When appropriate, students may transition to inclusive or general education classrooms while continuing to receive support through the Alternative Program. On an individual basis, students may participate in a Work Study Program based on Massachusetts Work-Based Learning Program. The goal is to create internships for students to help apply their skills learned in school while also developing social competencies necessary in relevant life experiences. Academic subjects and curriculum are modified, but are addressed in accordance with curriculum frameworks. Alternative Program courses may not be considered for admission to four year college programs.

A01 A03 A40 718

Alternative Program Course ELA 9/10 A10 World Lang & Culture A23 Current Issues A24 U.S. History ELA 11 A32 Mathematics A51 Writer’s Workshop A04 ELA 12 Health & Science A59 Work Experience Foods & Nu A05 Wellness A42 Survival Skills for Life

UNIQUE PROGRAMS 098

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING O 5 credits Grades - All Prerequisite: English as a second language Full Year The ELL course is offered to students whose primary language is not English. The course concentrates on listening, speaking, reading and writing in English. This is done through different reading materials at the student’s English Proficiency Level as determined by MEPA testing. Vocabulary and grammar are taught within the context of a chosen piece of literature. The primary series used in the course is English Yes. In addition, adapted short stories and poems are read. Students can take the course all four years of high school to support their language skills in all content areas. TEACHER ASSISTANT INTERNSHIPS 1 credit Grades 11-12 The Teacher Assistant Internship provides the student with the opportunity to explore possible career choices while providing service to the WMHS community under the direction of a faculty member. This individually created program requires that students seek out an internship sponsor. The TA experience can vary from a few hours per week to a daily experience that lasts the entire year. Some TA experiences may be held during the normal school day during ASC blocks while others may occur after 61

school. Requirements for internship responsibilities will be documented through a contract that provides guidelines for student participation. Students must be enrolled in six classes to participate. Grading is Pass/Fail.   

Teacher Assistant Specific Guidelines TA Supervisor must approve all internship sites. Monthly verification of hours and internship supervisor evaluation is required. A journal must be submitted at the end of each quarter.

CAREER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 5 credits Grade 12 The Career Internship Program (CIP) provides Grade 12 students with the opportunity to explore possible career choices, investigate a myriad of vocations, or perform community service through participation in a meaningful on-site and off-site, academically related experience. This individually created program requires that students seek out a “host” site and sponsor. WMHS staff will assist the student in the site selection process; however, the ultimate responsibility to secure a site is the responsibility of the student. Students may seek employment, perform community service or seek volunteer internships that are related to career interests. The CIP experience can vary from a few hours per week to a daily experience that lasts the entire year. Some CIP sites and experiences may be held during the normal school day while others may occur after school or on weekends. Senior students in good standing who have ASC scheduled for the end of the school day may be released with parent permission to go to internship sites. Students will be expected to submit monthly evaluations from site supervisors, maintain journals and meet with their faculty advisor periodically. A maximum of 5 credits may be earned annually and grading is pass/fail. CIP Specific Guidelines 1. 2. 3. 4.

CIP Supervisor must approve all internship sites. Monthly verification of hours and site supervisor evaluation is required. A journal must be submitted at the end of each quarter. Attendance at periodic meetings with the CCSI Supervisor is required.

CIP EARLY CHILDHOOD INTERNSHIP Grades 11 & 12 Credit TBD Students considering careers in the field of early childhood education may be interested in this opportunity to gain experience working with young children in a classroom environment. Students are matched with classroom settings at the neighboring Woodville School or community settings during available ASC periods. Completion of the Introduction to Child Development course is recommended preparation for this internship experience. Grades – All Full Year Credit TBD Technology Integration is a course in which students will be tasked with supporting students and faculty at Wakefield Memorial High School in the following regarding technology: 555

TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

C

- integration of the latest learning tools and trends in technology into the classroom - support for technological issues that arise throughout the year - development of technology skills and application 62

While tech support will be part of the mission of the course, students will mainly be tasked with staying on top of the newest trends, topics and ideas in the world of technology and how they can be implemented into the classroom environment. Students will be leaders who will direct their own learning, and assist teachers and peers in achieving their maximum technological potential. This is a graded course. VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL C, H or AP 2.5 or 5 credits Prerequisite: Expected by Department Grade: 10-12 The Virtual High School Collaborative (VHS) is a non-profit cooperative of over 575 national and international member high schools offering semester and full-year online courses. Wakefield Memorial High School is proud to be a new member of this cooperative, beginning in January of 2010. The mission of The VHS Collaborative is to develop and deliver standards-based, student-centered online courses to expand our students’ educational opportunities and 21st century skills. All VHS courses are taught by certified secondary school teachers by each of the schools participating in The VHS Collaborative. Currently there are over 200 courses offered in the VHS course catalog. Through these internet-based courses, we are able to significantly enhance our curricular offerings at Wakefield Memorial High School while integrating technology schools into students’ academic experience. The VHS website, www.theVHSCollaborative.org, lists the most current offerings. Students must sign up through the Guidance Department in conjunction with our VHS Site Coordinator. Wakefield Memorial High School hosts approximately 15 “seats” per semester. VHS courses are rigorous and should not be considered for credit recovery. Students will be required to work at the pace of the teacher as they would in a traditional class and should expect homework every day. Students are required to have strong organizational skills and study habits. Students will self-manage the work expectations during free periods at school and at home, receiving grades and credits on their transcript as with any other course they take at Wakefield Memorial High School. These courses will be included in GPA and Rank calculations. A VHS course cannot replace a course offered at WMHS without permission of the principal. A VHS course is to be considered one of the six classes in which students are required to enroll; it is not designed to overload a student’s schedule and students will be strongly discouraged from doing so. Students will be required to complete a registration form and sign a contract prior to being considered for enrollment. June 1 is the deadline to register with the VHS Site Coordinator. The principal will determine whether or not a course is accepted as a graduation requirement. Students who enroll in AP courses must take the AP exam, as well as pay the $75 AP fee and any lab equipment fees, per VHS policy. Students may only enroll and complete a contract in one VHS course per year prior to the last day of school. Once a student is registered for a class, he/she cannot withdraw nor audit the course. GUIDANCE HOMEROOM The focus of the guidance homeroom is to provide a caring and supportive environment for students who are experiencing anxiety. The aim is to support each student and to provide an environment where each student can experience academic success and feel emotionally supported as they begin their day at WMHS. The group meets every morning in the guidance conference room beginning at 7:30. If needed, the students are offered a 15 minute check-in with a guidance counselor prior to attending their first class of the day. The guidance homeroom facilitators are responsible for taking attendance. The goals of the group include: To develop as a group with mutual support, to empower each student, to teach/learn different relaxation techniques and coping skills, and to improve attendance and timeliness.

63

STEPS TO SUCCESS PROGRAM AND HOMEROOM Steps-2-Success is a school support program that assists students with their academics and goal-oriented behaviors. Students can be identified for this program a number of ways: Parent request for support through guidance, referral by guidance counselors or teachers, and in some cases, students advocate for the support themselves. This past year, we made an active effort to connect with the middle school to help identify students who would benefit from the support upon their transition into high school as well. The intent of the S2S program is to develop positive rapport with the students, giving them a sense of belonging to the school and faculty with whom they can identify. Through our program, we work on reinforcing positive behaviors in students and in promoting academic skills. This is done a number of ways: First and foremost, the students are connected to an advisor in the program. This year, it is run by the two School Psychologists of the school, as well as with potential interns. We also receive support from the guidance counselors. Advisors work with the students in setting up their goals, identifying weaknesses and concerns, and coming up with plans to address any problems. Students are given the opportunity to check in at least twice a day. First check-in occurs in a homeroom for our program students. This is a mixed grade homeroom run by both advisors, interns, and at times, counselors. The second checkpoint is during the student’s lunch period. The students are asked to swing by our rooms to touch base and review their daily progress. Daily Progress is monitored through the use of our S2S agenda books. The books are provided to the students at the beginning of each quarter and contain areas for students to record assignments, as well as a separate area for teachers to complete evaluations of the student based on their goals each day. We then collect this information and come up with strategies to address goals that are not being met with consistency. In order for this to work to its fullest potential, however, we need parental assistance. We recommend that students take their books home each day and review their reports with their parents. The parents, in turn, should sign off on the progress report. Through our collaborative efforts, this should help us maximize supervision for each student, communication, and help us prevent or mediate any problems along the way. Additional to the program this year is an Academic Seminar. Students who are new to our support are enrolled in this class, provided there are no conflicts in their schedule. Academic Seminar is a class geared towards the supervision of homework completion and studying, as well as skill building activities. Twice a week, students are presented with mini-lessons geared towards skill development in organization, study habits, and social problem solving and personal development (self-esteem, selfmonitoring, et cetera). The class is run by, at a minimum, one of the School Psychologists as well as a general education teacher. Most days, both psychologists and an intern are available. This helps maintain a low number of student to staff ratio, so that we can work individually or in small groups with students to help provide direction and monitor work. In addition, we retrieve work from each student’s teachers that he or she may be missing and make it a priority for completion in seminar. In this way, we can prevent students from receiving poor grades due to a lack of homework completion.

64

POS 16-17.pdf

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