THE MORGAN SCHOOL

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 2017-2018 ADMINISTRATION Maryann O’Donnell, Superintendent of Schools Marco Famiglietti, Assistant Superintendent of Schools Keri Hagness, Principal Tyler Webb, Assistant Principal

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT Grades 9 & 10 Joni Capobianco A-K Janice O’Brien L-Z Grades 11 & 12 Mya Rodowicz A-K Christie Williams-Kahn L-Z

71 Killingworth Turnpike-Clinton-Connecticut-06413 (860) 664-6504 Click here for the Morgan School Website

The Mission of the Clinton Public Schools is to prepare independent and collaborative learners empowered to embrace the future.

DRIVING FORCES & UNIFYING PRINCIPLES As a Professional Learning Community, we will: • Develop literacy in core disciplines to ensure quality learning experiences and achievement. • Embed the application of knowledge and skills in all learning experiences and new situations. • Develop and implement high-performing collaborative teams focused on improving teaching and learning. • Provide safe, high-quality learning environments that support the District’s commitment to its educational mission.



We are Morgan, We are Family Therefore, we agree to:

• • • • • • • • • •

Build and support a positive CPS community. Treat one another with kindness and empathy. Refrain from gossip - just say NO! Honor our time. Foster an environment where people communicate openly and professionally. Celebrate achievements of students, faculty, and administrators. Consistently support and adhere to Morgan policies. Press “refresh” – tomorrow is a new day. Take time to reflect and be open to growth. Value each other’s unique strengths and perspectives.

The Morgan School Academy Model was designed to develop and hone students’ skills both as they “transition in” to Morgan as well as when they “transition out” of Morgan. Every member of the Morgan community is dedicated to delivering all students consistent instruction and providing the necessary interventions and supports during the course of their high school career.

The Morgan School Academic Skills & Habits of Mind Academic Skills Grades 9 & 10

Grades 11 & 12

Students will... 1. Employ organizational skills and study skills.

Students will... 1. Strategically select and apply the methods of planning, organization, and studying that are most effective. 2. Demonstrate the ability to listen actively and 2. Employ active listening to engage in learnfollow directions. ing activities. 3. Think and work both collaboratively and inde- 3. Articulate thoughts clearly, use valid reasonpendently. ing to support one’s own opinions, and respectfully challenge the beliefs of others while collaborating. 4. Use evidence and data analysis to evaluate 4. Acquire and analyze data to make informed results and solve problems. decisions and identify solutions. Apply a problem-solving process to an authentic task or innovative experience. 5. Reflect on the quality of one’s work and iden- 5. Independently reflect on outcomes and apply tify methods for improvement. methods for improvement. 6. Demonstrate the ability to understand and 6. Read critically with an understanding of analyze text. diverse perspectives and bias. 7. Clearly articulate thoughts verbally and in 7. Express ideas clearly, concisely and engagwriting. ingly demonstrating strength, style, and confidence in speaking and writing. 8. Develop digital literacy through the responsi- 8. Use technology responsibly and effectively to ble use of online tools to demonstrate and share engage and collaborate as a global community learning. of learners.

Habits of Mind 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Show initiative; demonstrate an ability to set, work toward, and achieve goals. Display compassion and empathy for others. Assume both personal and civic responsibility. Be receptive to new ideas and open to varying perspectives. Understand personal strengths and limitations; advocate for support when needed. Be willing to take risks and learn from mistakes; demonstrate resilience. Communicate respectfully and effectively with others; utilize skills to resolve conflicts. Create, imagine, and innovate; exhibit curiosity and passion for learning. 5

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

CLINTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Clinton, Connecticut K-12 District

Preparing independent and collaborative learners empowered to embrace the future.

FOUNDATION SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES

The purpose for establishing a set of common learning competencies is the belief that all reaching and learning should be meaningful, relevant, and connected. Therefore, there should be a common threat to link all disciplines. The following K-12 Foundation Skills and Competencies are essential for all students to become independent and collaborative learners, and must be incorporated in all disciplines. The foundation competencies are not intended to limit any discipline; rather, they are intended to provide teachers, students, and the community with set of common expectations that will enhance curriculum, development and continuity of purpose, assist teachers in planning instruction and assessment, and improve student performance. 1. Reads a variety of literary, informational, and persuasive texts with understanding, and is able to analyze, interpret, evaluate text, and reads for enjoyment. 2. Uses appropriate forms of expressions and conventions of Standard English to com- tunicate and develop thoughts, share ideas, influence and persuade, and create and entertain. 3. Applies understanding of a writing process (drafting, revising, editing, and rewriting) top improve writing. 4. Listens and views verbal and nonverbal presentations in order to analyze, clarify, follow directions, and ask and answer questions. 5. Applies computational skills, number sense and mathematical techniques to solve problems and judge reasonableness of results. 6. Delivers oral and visual presentations using standard conventions, forms of expression, coherent sequence of thoughts, suitable vocabulary, and tools appropriate for the purpose and audience. 7. Collects, organizes, and presents data using charts, tables, and graphs to interpret findings, defend or refute predictions, and draw conclusions. 8. Investigates and evaluates information and arguments from various sources and points of view applying prior knowledge, and inductive and deductive reasoning to establish a personal stance and defend a rationale 9. Accesses a wide range of resources (print, non-print, and technological) to expand knowledge, conduct research, communicate information, create original works, and investigate complex problems. 10. Designs and applies techniques for investigating real-world issues and problems including; posing questions, hypothesizing, observing, collecting and analyzing data, and communicating findings. 11. Works collaboratively in a group to accomplish a goal by exchanging ideas, synthesizing information, investigation solutions to a problem, sharing workload and completing assigned tasks.

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Contents GENERAL INFORMATION 8 Graduation requirements 8 Junior portfolio exhibition 8 Summer school 9 Leveling 9 Course/level changes 9 Advanced academic opportunities 10 Early College Experience 10 The Morgan School honors diploma sequence 11 Recommended course of study for college-bound student 12 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Art 14 Business Education 15 English 16 Family & Consumer Science 20 Health Education 22 Mathematics 23 Music 26 Physical Education 28 Science 29 Social Studies 33 Technology Education 36 World Language 40 APPENDICES 44

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

General Information GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The following are the credits required of the 23 necessary to graduate: English 4 Business/Tech. Ed.* 1 Mathematics 3 Physical Education 1 Science 2 Health 0.5 Freshman Course 0.5 Electives 7 Art or Voc. Ed** 1 Social Studies 3 (including 1 in U.S. History and 0.5 in Civics) All freshmen must take a course in English, Math, Science, Social Studies, Health, Phys. Ed. & freshman seminar. All students are required to pass the Junior Portfolio Exhibition *Elective Courses in Business or Technology Education: Accounting I Digital Imaging I

Introduction to Engineering

Accounting II

Digital Imaging II

Personal Finance

Advanced Engineering

Entrepreneurship

Principals of Engineering

Advanced Graphic Production

Graphic Design I + II

Video Comm. - Live Broadcast

Business Applications

Journalism

Video Production I

Design Engineering

Intro to Communications

Video Production II

** Art/Vocational Ed Classes: Accounting I

Culinary Arts I

History of Rock & Roll

Accounting II

Culinary Arts II

Humanities Honors

Advanced Art/Portfolio

Digital Imaging I

Introduction to Art

Advanced Drawing & Painting

Digital Imaging II

Journalism

Advanced Engineering

Drawing & Painting

Rock Band

Advanced Graphic Production

Electronic Music

Principles of Engineering

Advanced Sculpture

Engineering Design & Development Sculpture

Business Applications

Entrepreneurship

Video Comm.- Live Broadcast

Child Development

Food Service I

Video Production I

Concert Band

Food Service II

Video Production II

Chorus

Graphic Design



JUNIOR PORTFOLIO EXHIBITION The Junior Portfolio presentation offers students the opportunity to discuss their progress toward achieving the skills necessary to succeed at the challenges they will face after high school. Students’ discussions will be based on insights they have gained from reflecting on the quality of their work over the three preceding years. In the spring of their junior year, students will make their presentations to a panel of teachers from all four district schools. Speaking in front of the panel will prepare students for interviews with prospective employers and college admissions officers, people who are likely to be less concerned with a specific grade in a specific course, but rather with what kind of reader, writer, and problem solver the applicant is. Successful completion of the Junior Portfolio Exhibition is a graduation requirement.

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SUMMER SCHOOL The purpose of summer school is to restore any lost credit from the previous academic year. Summer school make-up may be done at any regular summer school program. Work done during the summer will be averaged with the grade received during the school year. The school-year work will comprise 80% of the grade and the summer work 20% of the grade. In order to qualify for the summer school study, the student must have received at least two quarters of passing work in a full-year course, one quarter of passing work in a semester course, have taken the final examination in the course, and receive a final grade of 50% or higher.

LEVELING The difference between levels is in the quantity and quality of the work required. Generally speaking, students in higher-level courses are assigned more homework, longer term papers, and more sophisticated projects than those assigned to students in lower-level courses. In addition, students in higher-level courses must meet more stringent criteria for the purposes of earning a specific grade, as compared to the criteria used in lower-level courses. HONORS - the most demanding academic program available. Admission requirements for HONORS courses are an average of B+ or better in the preceding course AND the recommendation of their present teacher in that discipline. Preceding course means either the Grade 8 class or a Level I course at Morgan in that content area. Once enrolled in an Honors course, an average of C or better is required in order to continue the Honors sequence in that content area. LEVEL 1 & LEVEL 2 - courses which, if passed with AT LEAST a C average, will prepare the student for admission into 4-year colleges and universities. A strong academic program with college-oriented materials is used throughout. There is extensive reading and writing in all courses.

Course/Level Changes Guidance and/or administration will consider the request to override a teacher recommendation initiated by parents, and/or students, from the time students elect their courses in March until five (5) days prior to the start of school using the “Petition to Override a Teacher Recommendation” form. Once the school year has begun, and up to the 5th day of the semester, parents or students may initiate course/ level changes for Core Academic classes by putting in writing the reason(s) for the change and by signing a “Request for Change of Schedule” form. Course/leveling changes will then be allowed if there is agreement among the parent/guardian, the teacher, the department head, and the counselor that the student is in the wrong course or is mis-leveled. Should these individuals be unable to agree, the matter will be referred to administration for a decision, and that decision will be final. Elective course changes will not require the “Request for Change of Schedule” form. Once the 5th day of school has passed, course changes will not be permitted unless there are extenuating circumstances. After the second semester begins, course/leveling changes will be handled in accordance with the procedure utilized at the beginning of the school year for semester courses only. If a teacher, at any time, feels that a student has been inappropriately placed, she/he should notify the student’s counselor immediately.

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ADVANCED ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES The Morgan School cultivates intellect and character in partnership with families and the community. Students learn in a rigorous academic and student-centered environment that prepares them to become resourceful, productive, healthy citizens in a global society. The Morgan School offers a variety of core academic courses as well as electives at varying levels to accommodate to all types of learners. This brochure outlines the most advanced course offerings for students who seek to challenge themselves in one or more subjects. Students are permitted and encouraged to take as many advanced level courses as possible, and may take a combination of levels in order to receive their Morgan School diploma. Listed are advanced course opportunities organized by grade, and include Advanced Placement courses and Early College Experience (ECE) courses taught in conjunction with the University of Connecticut. Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Honors English I

Honors English II

AP English Language & Composition

English IV: Seminar in Writing Through Literature (ECE)

Honors Algebra I

Honors Geometry

Honors Algebra II

AP Calculus

Honors Geometry

Honors Algebra II

Honors Pre-Calculus

Probability & Statistics (ECE)

Honors Biology

Honors Biology

Honors Chemistry

AP Physics

Honors Spanish III

Honors Spanish IV

AP Biology*

Advanced French

Honors French II

Honors French III

AP Environmental Science*

Spanish Short Stories

Honors US History

Honors World History

Honors French IV

Honors Philosophy

AP US Government*

Honors Humanities

AP European History*

Anatomy & Physiology (ECE)

AP Spanish*

*Please note that some courses are listed at multiple grade levels to illustrate that they may be taken at the student’s convenience.

EARLY COLLEGE EXPERIENCE The University of Connecticut Storrs, Connecticut In this program, high school students work with Morgan teachers who have been approved by the University of Connecticut in a course of study for which they may receive full college credit. If the students later enter the University of Connecticut, they may already have this credit. If they enter other colleges, the University of Connecticut will furnish official transcripts indicating the number of university credits which they have taken. Credits from the ECE program may be accepted at universities other than UCONN. Morgan Courses Which Qualify: Descriptions of the courses listed below can be found in the curricula in which they are offered. Morgan Course

ECE Course

College Credits

#0455 Honors English

ENGL 1011

4

#0641 Probability & Statistics Level 1

STAT 1100Q

4

#0516 ECE (AP) Environmental Science

NRE 1000

4

#0509 ECE Anatomy & Physiology

AH 2001: Medical Terminology

4

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

THE MORGAN SCHOOL HONORS DIPLOMA SEQUENCE The Morgan School Honors Diploma Sequence has been designed to challenge the student who has demonstrated an intense motivation to succeed academically and has proved skillful in mastering subject matter through his/ her previous school years. The Honors Diploma Sequence has been formulated to direct students toward an academically sound preparation for the most demanding university courses of study. A student does not need to have scored extremely well on standardized IQ tests nor have participated in gifted classes to find success in this sequence. If the student has displayed a serious sense of purpose about schoolwork, an ability to plan and carry out his/her own homework schedule, and success in most academic areas, he/she should consider seeking an honors diploma. To enter the Honors Sequence, a student must take the highest level a course is offered at during their freshmen year, and must maintain a C or better as a final grade in each of these classes. For continued eligibility please consult the Advanced Academic Opportunities brochure. For HONORS courses, students need a B+ or better average in the preceding course AND the recommendation of their present teacher in that discipline. Preceding course means either the Grade 8 class or a Level 1 course at Morgan in the content area. Once enrolled in an Honors course, an average of C or better is required in order to continue the Honors sequence in that content area. Students completing the four-year sequence receive: 1. Morgan School Honors Diploma 2. Recognition in the Commencement Program 3. Recognition through academic attire at Commencement

Grade 9 Honors Algebra/Honors Geometry Honors Biology Honors US History World Language at Highest Level Offered

Grade 10 Honors English II Honors Geometry/Honors Algebra II Honors Biology Honors World History World Language at Highest Level Offered

Grade 11

Grade 12

AP English Language & Composition Honors Algebra II/Honors Pre-Calculus Honors Chemistry AP Government World Language at Highest Level Offered

English IV: Seminar in Writing Through Literature (ECE) Honors Pre-Calculus/AP Calculus AP Biology/AP Physics Honors Humanities

Honors English I

Students must take a minimum of 4 AP/ECE courses by graduation to receive an Honors diploma

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY FOR COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT TYPICAL FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS If a student is planning to attend a four-year college or university, he/she will need to take and pass, with a minimum final grade of C or better, the following courses: ENGLISH – 4 years MATH – 4 years including Algebra I and Geometry, with Algebra II strongly recommended HISTORY – at least 3 years including World History and US History. This is in addition to the State required course in Civics SCIENCE – at least 3 years including Biology and Chemistry WORLD LANGUAGES – 3 years of World Language study at the high school level

If a student has the goal to continue education beyond high school, he/she must pursue a rigorous course of study. Following are recommendations for college-bound students. The selection will provide a thorough preparation for college. The student must select courses of appropriate level of difficulty.

TYPICAL COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS COURSE

YEARS OF STUDY

English

4

Social Studies

3-4

Math

4

Science

3-4

World Language (through French or Spanish)

3-5

Vocational Ed./Art/Music

1

Technology Education

1

LIBERAL ARTS HIGHLY COMPETITIVE COLLEGE

TYPICAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE

English

4

4

History

3-4

3-4

Mathematics

4

3-4

Science

3-4

2-3

World Language

3-4

3

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

ELECTIVE SEQUENCES Sequence Business Art

Introductory Courses

Intermediate Courses

Advanced Courses

ACCOUNTING

Accounting I (1 year)

N/A

Accounting II (Year)

ART

Introduction to Art (S)

Drawing & Painting 2D (S) Sculpture 3D (S)

Adv Draw & Paint -2D (S) Adv Art 2D (S) Adv Sculpture 3D (S)

A/V COMMUNICATIONS

Technology

Intro to Communications (S) Video Communication-Live Broadcast (S) Video Production I (S)

Video Production II (S)

Intro to Engineering (S) Algebra II (Year) OR Intro to Communications (S)

Mech Drafting (S) Architectual Drafting (S)

Intro to Communications (S) Digital Imaging (S) Graphic Design (S)

Adv Graphic Production (S)

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION & SERVICES

Child Development (S)

Children: Closer Look (S)

Psychology (S)**

NUTRITION, FOOD PRODUCTION & SERVICES

Foods I (S)

Foods II (S)

Culinary Arts I (S) Culinary Arts II (S)

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING & DESIGN GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

Child/Family

(S) = Semester Course ** It is not required to take Child Development, Children: Closer Look before enrolling in Psychology

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Art Curriculum The art curriculum is designed to help students understand and appreciate the importance of art in our culture. A sequential program of instruction is offered to provide students with a solid foundation in the elements and principles of art. Students will explore a wide range of media and techniques. Link to Art Curriculum

INTRODUCTION TO ART

#0803 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This course introduces students to the art program and provides them with an understanding of the elements of art and the principles of design while sampling various disciplines such as painting, sculpture, print making and crafts.

DRAWING AND PAINTING (2D ART) #0805 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Students must pass Introduction to Art.

Students receive instruction on the important basics of drawing and painting such as contour line, shading, perspective, composition and color theory. Students will use pencil, ink, watercolor, tempera paint, acrylics and pastels to create portraits, still life, landscape and abstract art work.

SCULPTURE (3D ART) #0822 -Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Students must pass Introduction to Art.

Form, balance and tension are characteristics of sculpture that students will become acquainted with as they try additive and subtractive methods. Students will use wire, papier Mache, plaster, clay, stone and wood. Emphasis will be on personal expression and problem solving.

ADVANCED SCULPTURE (3D ART) #0826 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Students must pass Sculpture.

Students are given more complex sculpture assignments and will be expected to apply the concepts learned in their previous sculpture class to create original artwork.

ADVANCED DRAWING AND PAINTING (2D ART) #0808 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Students must pass Drawing & Painting.

Students are given more complex drawing and painting assignments and will be expected to apply the concepts learned in their previous painting class to create original artwork.

ADVANCED ART/PORTFOLIO #0814 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Students must pass Advanced Drawing & Painting or Advanced Sculpture.

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This class is designed for serious and selfmotivated students who would like to further his/ her study of drawing and painting or sculpture. Each student will choose assignments that best meet his/her individual needs as practicing artists.

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Business Education Curriculum The business education curriculum is designed to help students achieve four objectives: prepare for college, learn business for personal use, develop computer skills, and prepare for full-time employment upon graduation. Whatever a student’s objective, the business education curriculum includes courses that are applicable in a variety of areas, especially preparing students for college and introducing students to real-world experiences.

ACCOUNTING I Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0305 - Level 1 Year 1 Credit

Can be used as a third math credit or computer credit.

Students will learn the systematic methods of keeping records, both in business and for personal use. The complete accounting cycle is studied for both a service and merchandising business. Students will create a semi-automated accounting workbook utilizing Microsoft Excel to complete two comprehensive accounting simulations throughout the year. This course is geared to critical thinking, problem solving, cooperative and student centered learning. Guest speakers are invited into the classroom to open up the idea of pursuing a career within the multiple accounting fields available. This course is suitable for college bound students considering majoring in business or the high school graduate looking to start his or her own business.

students’ digital literacy skills. Students will use Microsoft Office Suite applications to produce authentic projects and real life applications.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Grades 10, 11, 12 #0320 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This course will provide a foundation for students to develop the skills necessary to build a small business. Students will use and expand innovative thinking skills, problem solving skills, analytical skills, and managerial skills during this project based learning course. Local small business owners are invited into the classroom to explain their business and how they achieved success. After reviewing a variety of case studies and scenarios students will collaborate to construct an authentic business plan that could have the potential of becoming a reality for the young entrepreneur who truly believes in and pursues his or her idea.

ACCOUNTING II Grades10, 11, 12 #0321 - Level 1 Year 1 Credit

Prerequisite - Accounting I.

This college-level accounting course is recommended for students interested in a career in business or pursuing a post-secondary degree in business. The course incorporates advanced methods of departmentalized accounting, internal control systems, general accounting adjustments, and managerial accounting. Guest speakers are invited into the classroom to enrich visions for career opportunities within the accounting field.

BUSINESS APPLICATIONS

Grades 10, 11, 12 #0324 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This is a semester computer course that will improve

PERSONAL FINANCE Grades 10, 11, 12

#0349 - Level 1

Semester 1/2 credit This course is designed to give students valuable insight into the fundamentals of managing and investing their money. Topics addressed in this course are employment and career development, banking, consumer credit, debt management, investments, budgeting, the finances of housing, taxes, and insurance. To further enrich students in the topics discussed, a computer simulation that reflects real market conditions is used to reinforce the curriculum and to give students a better understanding of what is to come outside of high school.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

English Curriculum The English Curriculum at The Morgan School has been designed to foster the growth of our students as thoughtful and reflective readers, writers, and thinkers. Students will work to improve their ability to read, write, listen, and observe critically. Course levels have been designated in order to provide the students in those courses with appropriate challenges and materials, and to maximize their potential for success. Instruction in all levels will encourage students to master the district’s fundamental skills and competencies. Link to English Curriculum

Typical Course Sequence TYPE

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

REQUIRED COURSES English I Freshman Course

English II

English III

English IV

ELECTIVES

Journalism

Journalism Creative Writing Film Study Media Literacy

UCONN English 1011 Humanities Journalism Creative Writing Film Study Media Literacy

Journalism

ENGLISH I

Grade 9 #0401 - Level 1 Year 1 credit In Freshman English, students will continue their study of literature, organized by genre: short story, poetry, novel, and drama. Applying a variety of reading strategies, students will analyze fiction as well as non-fiction texts. In addition, employing several writing strategies, students will participate in the writing process, responding to various texts and strengthening skills in English conventions. Students also will work to enhance their abilities in cooperative group work, class discussion, and oral presentation. Text-based vocabulary as well as the department’s program will develop student’s vocabulary.

ENGLISH I

ENGLISH I

Grade 9 #0402 - Level 2 Year 1 credit In Freshman English, students will continue their study of literature, organized by genre: short story, poetry, novel, and drama. Applying a variety of reading strategies, students will analyze fiction, as well as nonfiction texts. Likewise, employing several writing strategies, students will participate in the writing process, responding to various texts and strengthening skills in English conventions. Students also will work to enhance their abilities in cooperative group work, class discussion, and oral presentation. Text-based vocabulary and S.A.T. Powerplus book will aim to develop students’ vocabulary comprehension and usage of new vocabulary.

Grade 9 #0404 - Honors Year 1 credit

ENGLISH II

Students will use the archetypal approach to explore early Western Literature such as classical Greek and Roman epics, plays, and speeches. The course will conclude with a study of medieval literature with an emphasis upon Dante’s Inferno, an investigation which ties all course ideas together. Students will receive instruction in a variety of expository and narrative writing techniques.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I.

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation.

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Grade 10 #0408 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

This course is designed to challenge students with readings that test and develop their critical reading, thinking, and writing skills. Students will continue to learn how to improve writing, speaking, reading, and listening skills in addition to increasing their vocabulary and developing test-taking strategies. This course is designed for those students who wish

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018 to attend a competitive four-year college or university upon graduation from The Morgan School. Emphasis is on fiction and non-fiction texts from outside the United States.

variety of writing assignments, this course will prepare students for the AP English Language exam and for college level coursework.

ENGLISH II

Grade 11 #0485 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Grade 10 #0414 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I (Honors), or teacher recommendation and a grade of A in English I Level 1.

Students in this course will explore the classics of British literature from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Contemporary texts will also be read which examine similar archetypes and themes. An emphasis will be placed on a close reading of the literature and on developing a thoughtful, critical, personal reaction to the texts. Students will also hone their writing skills through extensive practice and will improve their ability to comprehend challenging college texts through intensive vocabulary study.

ENGLISH II

Grade 10 #0406 - Level 2 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I.

Using the prose and poetry of British, European, Asian and African writers for reading skills development, students examine their own use of language. Appealing selections based on the theme “Choice and Consequence” help students refine their skills in the basic areas of communication. Emphasis is upon the practical application of language power. This course is designed for students who are interested in building skills and confidence in language arts.

ENGLISH III Honors/AP English Language & Composition Grade 11 #0423 - Honors -Advanced Placement Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English II (Honors), or teacher recommendation in English II Level 1.

Students who take this course will read and analyze diverse American texts including speeches, letters, articles, memoirs and images. Students will gain understanding of how language functions while deepening their understanding of the world. Through class discussions, individual and group projects, and a

ENGLISH III

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English II.

A survey of literature of the Western Hemisphere, with an emphasis on literature of the United States, provides the basis for language development in this class. Instruction of each author read requires students to examine the way words are used to communicate effectively. Test-taking strategies continue to be addressed, as do vocabulary development and research study skills. This course is designed for students who wish to attend a competitive four-year college or university upon graduation from The Morgan School.

ENGLISH III

Grade 11 #0486 - Level 2 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English II.

This course continues to emphasize the development of students’ effective communication skills. “The Struggle for Identity” is the theme for the year as students react to the diversity of the American people, a diversity celebrated in this American literature course. Reliance upon one’s self and one’s fellowman will be recognized as students collaborate on various projects. Reading, writing, and test-taking strategies will enable the students to think and communicate clearly and effectively. This course is designed for students who are interested in building skills and confidence in language arts.

ENGLISH IV

Grade 12 #0491- Level 1 Year 1 credit Students in this course will work to gain competence and confidence in a range of language arts skills. During the first semester students will examine different rhetorical patterns evident in college-level essays and stories. Using these as models, students will learn a variety of strategies to help them develop a clear, cogent style in their written work. While most students recognize the basics of good writing, in this course they will build on that knowledge, and through

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018 coaching and practice, learn to communicate more effectively. During the second semester, students in this course will build on previous learning to further develop their ability to analyze complex texts and to communicate what they learn from those texts in a variety of ways. Instruction will focus on the ways in which an author constructs an argument. Students will work both independently and cooperatively to hone their research, speaking, listening, and collaboration skills in preparation for the rigors of college-level work.

ENGLISH IV

Grade 12 #0492 - Level 2 Year 1 credit Students in this course will work to gain competence

and confidence in a range of language arts skills. During the first semester, students will explore a range of fiction and nonfiction texts in order to understand the methods writers use to develop their ideas. Instruction will focus on the qualities of good writing so that students can transfer these qualities into their own writing. The goal is to foster the clear communication skills so necessary in any career. During the second semester, students will build on previous learning to further develop their ability to understand what they read, particularly the kind of texts they will be reading once they graduate. Instruction will focus on ways in which an author constructs an argument. Students will work both independently and cooperatively to hone the research, speaking, listening, and collaboration skills required for success in the world beyond high school.

THE ELECTIVE PROGRAM All students must take and pass four years of English. As seniors, students can select from a number of electives to further hone their skills as readers, writers, and thinkers. Seniors may take the UCONN English course or the Honor Humanities course in place of English IV.

UCONN ENGLISH 1011: WRITING THROUGH LITERATURE Grade 12 #0455 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite 1: C+ or higher in Honors English III, OR A- or higher in College Prep English III Prerequisite 2: Top 20% of his/her class, OR 550+ on Critical Reading S.A.T.

Students will advance their exploration of challenging literature and participation in the intellectual conversation of academic reading and writing. In literary criticism essays, students will construct and substantiate claims in regard to interpretations of class readings. In personal/expository essays, students will continue to incorporate writing patterns, as well as engage in intensive inquiry-based writing assignments. Close-reading, re-reading, unpacking language, writing, conferencing, and revising, all essential parts of critical literacy and writing, will be stressed. Students will be prepared to take the AP Literature and Composition exam. Students may earn four college credits.

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HUMANITIES

Grade 12 #0024 – Honors Year 1 credit In this course, students investigate the art, architecture, music, and literature of various cultural periods. Students will gain an understanding of the philosophical perspectives and historical context which helped to shape the cultural output of these periods. Students’ ability to express themselves creatively will be challenged as they explore the creative expression of our civilization’s greatest artists, writers, and thinkers. Visits to museums are an integral part of the course.

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

JOURNALISM

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0425 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit Students will learn about the world of journalism by taking on the role of a journalist and creating content for The Morgan PawPrint, the digital news source of The Morgan School. Students will write, take photos, create videos, report on school events and keep people informed through Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Roles students fill will include reporter, photographer, videographer, editor, writer, and publicist. The emphasis will be on the principals of clarity, accuracy and fairness. Any student of any grade may take this course. Students may take the course up to four times for credit. This course satisfies a technology requirement.

their knowledge of the Internet and many Web 2.0 tools. Central to the course are the Essential Questions: (1) What does it mean to be a twenty-first century learner? And, (2) how do we prepare ourselves to be responsible twenty-first century citizens? Freshman Course students will study several topics intended to help them explore themselves as well as the world around them. Some of the assignments to be completed during the course include learning styles and strategies exploration, internet-based research projects, multimedia presentations covering a wide range of topics, and independent reading activities. These assignments are designed to improve students’ media literacy and to give students a greater understanding of their role in our ever-changing world.

FILM STUDY

Grade 11, 12 #0459 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit Students will examine a variety of films from both an analytic and creative perspective. When analyzing film, students will examine elements of plot, setting, character and point of view. Students will utilize electronic media as well as traditional media to reflect and articulate their ideas. Students will also examine how both mise-en-scene and mise-e-shot influence artistic intent. (Note: Not NCAA approved.)

MEDIA LITERACY

CREATIVE WRITING

Grades 11, 12 #0446 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This comprehensive writing course exposes students to various types of creative writing including creative nonfiction, short story, mystery, poetry, children’s story, and the one act play. Students must be prepared to share their work with the class and to support the efforts of their classmates.

FRESHMAN COURSE

Grade 9 Semester 1/2 credit Freshman Course is a required course for all ninth grade students. The course is designed to introduce students to a variety of technologies that will enhance

Grade 11, 12 #0490 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit Media Studies involves the study and analysis of media in all of its forms. Students will deconstruct the language, methods, formulae, images and messages in advertising, music, video games, television shows and film to achieve a deeper understanding of these common forms of media. Current research will also be introduced to consider the effects of social media and media consumption on society. Furthermore, students can expect to create their own productions of many of the above mentioned media following the processes used by professionals in those areas. In producing media, students will use cameras for filming and computer-based film editing programs to create a polished final cut. Students will be graded primarily on class discussions, written reflections, debates and creative productions. (Note: Not NCAA approved.)

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Family & Consumer Science Curriculum The Family and Consumer Science curriculum at Morgan School offers elective courses to all students. Courses provided enable students to explore several career-oriented courses including working within the Food industry and Childcare related fields of study. Many of the courses offered help students understand real-life challenges and ways to deal with these in a healthy way. Courses offered include Food Service, Professional Culinary Arts, and Child Development. Link to Family & Consumer Science Curriculum

FOOD SERVICE I

Grades 9, 10, 11 #0851 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This course will cover information and skills in the areas of nutrition, meal planning, food preparation, and food purchasing. The students will study areas that are not only vital to health, well-being and saving money, but also possible career opportunities. The primary areas of focus will include: safety and sanitation, measuring, using basic kitchen equipment, consumer skills, basic nutrition, quick breads, fruits, vegetables, dairy products, eggs and grains.

CULINARY ARTS I Grades 10, 11, 12 #0885 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Food Service II with a C average or better.

This course combines the basic knowledge learned in Food Service I and II to focus on how dining room management operates. Students will cater and serve various groups visiting the school on a fairly regular basis. The focus will be on nutrition, meal planning, cost analysis, team work, kitchen organization, presentation skills and quality service.

FOOD SERVICE II Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0881 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Food Service I with a C average or better.

This course will expose students to advanced food preparation techniques and basic professional culinary skills. The primary focus will include baking and pastry (including yeast breads, cakes, and pastries) and regional foods of the United States. A basic understanding of the history and cultures of each region will be researched and prominent foods within each region will be prepared and presented. Students will have the opportunity to visit various culinary arts schools as well as meet with chef’s from various schools to investigate careers within the foods industry.

CULINARY ARTS II Grades 10, 11, 12 #0886 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I.

This course expands on the skills learned throughout Culinary Arts I. Students will learn to integrate cooking and event planning skills in order to practice all aspects of the restaurant experience. Menu planning, communication with customers, food preparation, and professional table service will be the focus for this course. Students interested in a career within the food industry are highly encouraged to enroll in this course.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

CHILD DEVELOPMENT: THE PRESCHOOL EXPERIENCE Grades 10, 11, 12 #0841 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of childcare: prenatal care, childbirth, and care of infants, toddler, and preschoolers. The students will study the physical, emotional, social, and the intellectual growth of the child and put into practice through the planning, observing, and directing of a ten-week preschool program. Students will also visit and observe at a local preschool program. Students who enjoy working with children are encouraged to enroll in this course.

CHILDREN: A CLOSER LOOK

Grades 10, 11, 12 #0838 Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This course examines current issues in the world of young children. Several topics explored include child abuse and neglect, promoting positive discipline, basic nutrition and childhood obesity, eating disorders, children and safe use of technology, keeping children safe, and careers within the childcare field. This course would be beneficial to anyone looking to parent in the future or to anyone going into the field of child development.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Health Education Curriculum The health education curriculum presents to the student the concept that good health decisions and habits practiced during early adolescence will reduce the occurrence of related health problems and extend life expectancy and quality. Specific objectives of Health are: 1. To give students a knowledge base on the behaviors that will lead to an extended, happy, full, and healthy life. 2. To raise the students’ awareness of how emotions are directly related to health and illness. 3. To inform students of normal body and mental functions, and how certain behaviors and emotions change these normal functions. 4. To have students be able to access community people and services available when they need help with their problems. 5. To provide students with accurate information on commonly abused drugs. 6. To enable students in the area of decision making and refusal skills. 7. To enable students to access accurate, up to date health information to use in decision making. Link to Healthy and Balanced Living Curriculum

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES Health is offered in the Junior Year. The focus of the course is on wellness and the effect one’s behaviors, attitudes and choices have on personal health and well-being. Topics included during the semester-long course include: exercise and diet, stress, hormones, the media and self perception, decision making, and goal setting.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Mathematics Curriculum MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM The curriculum in mathematics is designed to serve students of varying abilities and interests. While three credits in mathematics will satisfy graduation requirements, students are encouraged to avail themselves of the many elective offerings. Link to Mathematics Curriculum

Suggested sequence LEVEL

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

HONORS

Honors Geometry

Honors Algebra II

Honors Pre-Calculus

AP Calculus ECE Prob + Statistics

HONORS

Algebra I Honors

Geometry Honors

Algebra II Honors

Pre-Calc Honors

LEVEL 1

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

Pre-Calc (L1)(year)

LEVEL 2

Algebra 1

Geometry

Algebra II

Trig (Sem 1) Prob + Stat (Sem 2)

PRE-ALGEBRA

Grades 9, 10, 11 #0602 - Level 2 Year I credit This course provides the core concepts that are essential for Algebra I. Emphasis is placed on computational skills, introductory Algebra topics, and problem solving.

ALGEBRA I

Grades 9, 10 #0601 - Level 1 Year 1 credit Algebra I provides the basic foundation for subsequent courses in mathematics. Emphasis is on the understanding of mathematical concepts and the development of a mathematical structure that can be extended to the more complicated areas of mathematics. Topics include operations with rational factors and exponents, linear and simple quadratic equations.

ALGEBRA I

Grades 9, 10 #0606 - Level 2 Year 1 credit This course covers, at a slower pace, the essential topics of Algebra I, level 1, but mathematical structure is emphasized to a lesser degree. More time is devoted to the development and understanding of concepts and provision is made for extensive practice in their application.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

ALGEBRA I

GEOMETRY

Prerequisite: Grade of B+ in eighth grade mathematics.

Prerequisite: Grade of B+ in Algebra I, level 1.

Grades 9 #0604 - Honors Year 1 credit

This course, rigorous in approach, covers at a faster pace the essential topics of Algebra I, Level 1. While emphasis is placed on the development of a mathematical structure (algebraic proofs), fundamental skills will not be ignored. The intent is to build a solid foundation for future sequential courses.

Grades 10, 11 #0614 - Honors Year 1 credit



This course covers at a faster pace the essential topics of Geometry, level 1, with an emphasis being placed on proofs. Enrichment topics will include certain aspects of non-Euclidean geometry and a limited study of Aristotelian logic. In addition to this, students will be assigned independent work on constructions.

ALGEBRA II

Grades 11, 12 #0619 - Level 2 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Geometry

The study of the logical structure of the real number system is used to review and expand the topics of elementary algebra. Course content includes linear and quadratic functions, complex number systems, and systems of equations in two and three variables, sequences and series.

GEOMETRY

ALGEBRA II

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in Algebra I, level 1.

Prerequisite: Geometry

Grades 9, 10, 11 #0605 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Grades 10, 11, 12 #0608 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

The structure of mathematics, leading systematically from definitions, properties, and postulates to theorems and corollaries, is emphasized. Topics include: properties of lines, planes, and angles; parallel and perpendicular lines and planes; congruence and similarity, coordinate systems in a plane, space coordinates, areas and volumes.

This course included an in-depth study of those topics listed in the course description of Algebra II, Level 2.

GEOMETRY

Prerequisite: Grade of B+ in Geometry level 1.

Grades 10, 11 #0612 - Level 2 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course stresses basic geometric concepts and understanding developed inductively through constructions, paper folding, and computer software. Topics include: properties of lines, planes, and angles; parallel and perpendicular lines and planes; congruence and similarity; areas and volumes.

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ALGEBRA II

Grades 10, 11 #0634 - Honors Year 1 credit

This course, rigorous in approach, covers at a faster pace the essential topics of Algebra II, level 1. Structure and computational skills are stressed, while emphasis is placed on problem-solving techniques.

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

PRE-CALCULUS

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Grade of C in Algebra II, Level 1.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- in Algebra II Level 2.

Grades 11, 12 #0628 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

This course includes concepts and skills which are necessary for the study of calculus. Topics will include: functions, graphs, zeros, conic sections, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometry, parametric equations and polar coordinates. The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the curriculum.

Grade 12 #0642 - Level 2 Semester 1/2 credit

This course provides an introduction to probability and statistics covering topics in descriptive statistics, fundamentals of probability and probability distributions. Mathematical skills of Algebra II, the graphing calculator, and computer software are used to provide the basic skills in statistical analyses used in many fields of study such as business and social sciences.

PRE-CALCULUS

ECE PROBABILITY & STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Grade of B+ in Algebra II, level 1.

Prerequisite: Grade of B- in Pre-Calculus Level 1.

Grades 11, 12 #0693 - Honors Year 1 credit

This course, rigorous in approach, includes an in-depth study of those topics listed in the course description of Pre-Calculus, level 1. The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the curriculum.

Grade 12 #0640 – Honors Year 1 credit

Standard and nonparametric approaches to statistical analysis; exploratory data analysis, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing. Learning to do statistical analysis on a personal computer is an integral part of the course. Credit may be given by the University of Connecticut for STAT 1100QC.

AP CALCULUS Grade 12 #0694 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B- in Honors Pre-Calculus.

TRIGONOMETRY Grade 12 #0629 - Level 2 Semester 1/2 credit

This course includes a brief review of elementary functions and a rigorous study of introductory calculus. Topics will include: algebraic functions introductory calculus, graphs, limits, derivatives, anti-derivatives, and applications of the derivative. Graphing calculators will be used; however, students must be comfortable with hand calculations. A summer packet will be required.

Prerequisite: Algebra II.

The properties of the trigonometric functions are studied with emphasis placed upon the use of trigonometric identities, graphing, and the solution of trigonometric equations. Solution of triangles using the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines is also stressed.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Music Curriculum The music curriculum offers a wide variety of musical experiences for students. Most courses have no prerequisite. Morgan offers courses to learn about music via computer programs, beginning lessons on guitar, various rock-n-roll courses and high quality instrumental & vocal performing ensembles. Link to Music Curriculum

Performing Organizations

Participation in any of the performing groups requires students to be available for local public performances.

CONCERT BAND Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0031 Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful participation in the Morgan or Eliot Concert Band last year; or approval of the band instructor.

Concert Band is study of various music styles, history and theory through classroom rehearsals and public performances. The Morgan Band will perform in a concert setting at least three times during the school year. The Morgan Band also participates in the Clinton Memorial Day Parade. These four performances are mandatory for members of the band. Some solo opportunities may be available; auditions may be required at the discretion of the director. Students wishing to participate in extracurricular instrumental or band activities need to be members of the Morgan Concert Band

CHORUS

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0034 - Level 1 Year 1 credit Participation in the Morgan Chorus will provide basic technical knowledge of vocal production and exposure to a wide variety of choral repertoire. The Morgan Chorus will perform in a concert setting at least three times during the school year as well as at the Morgan Commencement Ceremonies. These four performances are mandatory for members of the Chorus. Some solo opportunities may be available; auditions may be required at the discretion of the director. Students wishing to participate in extracurricular vocal activities need to be members of the Morgan Chorus.

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ROCK BAND

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0030 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

No Prerequisite, but this course is designed for students with at least a basic playing proficiency on the guitar, bass, keyboards, or drums.

Rock Band class is for students who play guitar (acoustic and/or electric), bass, drums & keyboards. Class time will be primarily large and/or small group rehearsals broken up with lectures and demonstrations involving contemporary technique, theory, timing, improvisation, reading, rock history, how to practice, and how to listen. Music will be selected by the instructor as well as the students from simple rock songs of the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, 80’s & 90’s (as well as a little folk, blues, country, pop & reggae). This will be a “performance oriented” class with our goal to get out and play at various times during the semester.

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018 basics of playing guitar at a beginning level through studying music notation, tablature and chord symbols. Students will also gain a understanding of flatpicking, fingerpicking, rhythmic patterns, posture, singing songs, musical forms, improvisation and have performing experiences.

ELECTRONIC MUSIC Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 # 0043 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit No Prerequisite

HISTORY OF ROCK AND ROLL Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 # 0042 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit No Prerequisite

Explore Rock & Roll from its earliest beginnings to the present day. This course will examine the evolution of Rock & Roll and it’s significance from musical, historical, social, and political developments. Classes will be organized around lectures, recordings, videos, group discussions, activities and projects.

Learn the basic elements of music like melody, rhythm, form, tone and dynamics by composing music with Apple’s GarageBand on Macintosh computers. Students will use MIDI based keyboard controllers to interface with the software. Basic musical notation and principles of music theory, structure and form and will be taught along the way. Recording projects and uploading musical files will be covering as well. No previous musical experience or classes are needed. Students may advance to using Sibelius music notation software toward the end of the semester to print and distribute their compositions.

BEGINNING GUITAR Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 # 0020 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit No Prerequisite

This semester course is designed for students with no previous guitar experience. Students learn to play the guitar as well as simple musical fundamentals and theory along the way. Students will learn the

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Physical Education Curriculum Students at the Morgan School will be provided opportunity to participate in a wide variety of activities which will help them gain necessary experience, confidence, knowledge, skills, how to be appropriate member of a team, leadership, effective communication, pride in school/community, respect and appreciation for self and others, problem solving skills and the awareness that physical activity is necessary for a healthy body, mind and spirit. Link to Healthy & Balanced Curriculum

COURSE OVERVIEW

Physical Education is a required course for graduation by the State of Connecticut and the Clinton Board of Education.Students will participate in class every day for the duration of one quarter. Students choose one of two units offered that he/she would like to learn or gain further knowledge/experience in. Usually there are 4-5 units offered per quarter. Units run between 5-12 class periods. Students are encouraged and welcomed to utilize study hall time all year to participate in P.E. classes provided grades and behavior in all other academic classes are appropriately maintained. Students are giving various forms of evaluations to show growth in fitness, knowledge and skill through the use of Rubrics (unit specific and P.E. specific), pre/posttests, teacher evaluations, problem solving questions, progress reports, skills charts and CT fitness test (freshman and sophomores only).

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State Fitness Testing

Zumba

Handball

Badminton

Bunkerball

Fitness/Weight Lifting

Tennis

Self-Challenging Obstacle Course

Yoga

Ultimate Frisbee

Pickleball

Yard Games (Bocce, Capper Ball, Can Jam, Croquette, Horse Shoes)

Mat-Ball

Cooperative/Team Building Games

Create Your Own Fitness Plan

Basketball

Wiffle Ball

Create Your Own Game

Gater Ball

Volleyball

Create Your Own Music Video

Indoor Soccer

Floor Hockey

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Science Curriculum The foundation of science is built around inquiry and exploration of challenging issues that face our planet. Our curricula will foster an interest in our world and provide the necessary skills for students to be successful in any career path they pursue. The science curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students of varied interests and abilities. College bound students should choose at least three core courses (preferably four). The basic college track is Integrated Science (9th), Biology (10th), Chemistry (11th) and Physics (12th). The goal of the science curricula is to give students opportunities to solve problems independently and work collaboratively in a variety of ways. These experiences will be in the form of laboratory experiments, projects and presentations. The goal of these activities will be learning how to think critically and apply science concepts to authentic issues. Link to Science Curriculum

Suggested sequence LEVEL

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

HONORS

Honors Biology

Honors Chemistry

AP Physics

AP Biology ECE Environ. Science

LEVEL 1

Integrated Science

Biology

Chemistry

Physics Earth + Space Anatomy + Physiology Forensic Science

HONORS BIOLOGY

Grade 9 #0504 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Recommendation from eighth grade science teacher or permission of the department chairperson.

This rigorous course will challenge students with the complexities of the living systems. The major areas of study include biochemistry, cell biology, genetics & evolution. The laboratory will include frequent inquiry investigations. These activities will allow students considerable opportunity to explore major concepts in biology and solve problems independently and collaboratively.

INTEGRATED SCIENCE

Grade 9 #0505 - Level 1 Year 1 credit This course is an introduction to science skills and concepts that will engage a diverse student population. Students will challenge and support one another in a rich learning environment that will develop collaboration and problem solving skills. This laboratory-centered course provides students with concepts and skills common throughout all science

courses. Topics considered include fundamental measurements, properties of matter, the atomic nature of matter, environmental issues, electricity, magnetism and heat transfer. Emphasis is placed upon the development of laboratory technique and science inquiry, mathematical manipulations and creative thinking. Inquiry and problem solving will engage students through hands-on activities. The proper method of writing lab reports will be emphasized.

HONORS BIOLOGY Grade 10 #0504 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Honors Integrated Science or permission of the department chairperson.

This rigorous course will challenge students with the complexities of living systems. The major areas of study include biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution and animal phyla. The laboratory will include frequent inquiry investigations. These activities will allow students considerable opportunity to explore major concepts in biology and solve problems independently and collaboratively.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

BIOLOGY

Grade 10 #0501 - Level 1 Year 1 credit This is a broad survey course designed to meet the demands of students who plan to further their studies in college, particularly in the biological sciences. It is a blend of the traditional, lecture-laboratory, and discussion approaches. Core topics include: biochemistry, cells, genetics, evolution, animal phyla and ecology. The laboratory will coordinate with the lecture material. This course will focus on exploration and generate collaboration with hands-on activities.

HONORS CHEMISTRY Grades 10, 11, 12 #0524 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisites: Grades of B- or better in Algebra I, and Honors Integrated Science or permission of department chairperson.

Honors chemistry is designed for students who plan to attend a highly selective university and perhaps major in the sciences. The course moves at a faster pace than Level I Chemistry and explores a larger number of topics as well as requiring a greater depth of understanding. Laboratory summary reports and a short research report are required.

CHEMISTRY

Grades 10, 11, 12 #0508 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra I and Integrated Science.

A course designed to give college preparatory students an introduction to the basics of chemistry which they would need to succeed in college science courses. Among the topics considered are the structure and classification of matter, chemical bonding, nomenclature, modern atomic theory, solutions, equilibrium systems, and acid-base theories. These and other topics are studied through mathematical as well as conceptual approaches. Laboratory reports will be handed in regularly. Students considering taking this course should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II or already have completed that course. Note: Students who do not anticipate applying to a four-year college are allowed to select an enrichment course without taking chemistry. *Students planning to enter nursing at the RN or BSN level and those planning on other health field careers which require a four-year college degree should enroll in this course.

FOUNDATIONS IN CHEMISTRY Grades 11, 12 #0521 - Level 2 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: C- or better in freshman science or permission of instructor or department chairman.

This course provides a general overview of the basics of chemistry for students entering technical school, two-year college or four-year college to study a nonscience related major. It is designed to meet the needs of the student who does not have a strong background in math, but who seeks an understanding of the basics of chemistry before entering technical school, twoyear college or a four-year college to study a non -science related major. Major topics in chemistry will be covered through student-centered activities that include labs and real world applications.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

AP PHYSICS I

Grade 11, 12 #0534 - Honors - Advanced Placement Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: B- or better in Honors Chemistry and Honors Algebra II.

The AP Physics I course focuses on the big ideas typically included in the first semester of an algebrabased, introductory college-level physics course and provides students with enduring understandings to support future advanced course work in the sciences. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop critical thinking and reasoning skills. Topics covered include motion, forces, energy, momentum, circular motion, rotation, oscillation, universal gravitation, electrostatics, electricity and sound. This course prepares students to take the AP Physics I exam offered by the College Board. After the exam, students will complete independent projects in a physics area of their choice. Students who plan to pursue a career in a STEM field are strongly encouraged to take AP Physics I.

PHYSICS

Grade 11, 12

#0518 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C+ or better in Chemistry and Algebra II

This course focuses on increasing your understanding of the world we live in, how it changes and how nature abides by certain predictable laws, through inquiry and experimentation. Topics covered include motion, forces, energy, momentum, circular motion, waves, sound, optics and electrostatics. This is a general college preparatory course. Students planning a future career in science, medical, or health fields are strongly encouraged to take physics.

SCIENCE ENRICHMENT OPTIONS ECE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE / NRE 1000

Grades 11, 12 #0516 - Honors (Level 1 students are encouraged to take this course) Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in Biology. Students must have taken Chemistry or be currently enrolled in Chemistry. Students not meeting the prerequisites must seek the approval of the instructor.

An introduction to basic concepts and areas of environmental concern and how these probelms can be effectively addressed. Topics include human population, ecological principals, conservation of biological resources, biodiversity, croplands, rangelands, forestlands, soil and water conservation, pollution and water management, and wildlife and fisheries conservation. Traditional lectures will be combined with laboratories, in class group research projects and presentations. This course is designed as the first college level environmental science course and four credits are available for this course through UConn. UConn ECE students must successfully complete the course with a grade of C or above in order to receive University credit. UConn credits are transferable to many colleges and universities. Students are also prepared for the AP Exam.

EARTH AND SPACE

Grades 11, 12 #0541 - Level 1 Year 1 credit This course focuses on the studies of Earth’s geology, human impact on the Earth, and astronomy, including the significant theories and discoveries.Topics include cartography, plate tectonics, Earth’s materials, instrumentaton, climate, examination of superfund sites, use of natural resources and cosmology. There will be demonstrations, activities and laboratory experimentation. Class discussions regarding current events are central to the exploration of this diverse course.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

AP BIOLOGY

Grade 10, 11, 12 #0502 - Honors - Advanced Placement Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Grades of B- or better in Biology and Chemistry or permission from instructor.

This advanced biology course will expand the major themes presented in the first year of biology. The course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory course for biology majors. The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modem biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. The content included in this course is as follows: I. Molecules and Cells, 25% II. Heredity and Evolution, 25% III. Organisms and Populations, 50%

FORENSIC SCIENCE

Grades 11, 12 #0522- Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit Forensics is a one-semester investigative science and technology course. Students will learn how to observe, collect, analyze and evaluate evidence found at crime scenes. Some of the many topics covered are fingerprint analysis, hair and fiber comparison, serology and crime scene analysis. Forensics is a demanding, fast-paced course covering a new topic of evidence nearly every week. The culmination of the course will include the analysis of a crime scene.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Grades 11, 12 #0509 - Level 1 Year 1 Credit

STEM PHYSICS Grades 10, 11, 12 #0517 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: C or better in Biology; C or better in Algebra II or taken concurrently

The course is an introduction to physics, aligning science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) with physics topics. Emphasis is on the conceptual and practical applications of physics, through projectbased learning. This course is the advanced course in the STEM - Engineering Sequence. Students interested in pursuing a career in a STEM field are strongly encouraged to take STEM Physics. Juniors who choose to take STEM Physics may choose to enroll in Physics or AP Physics in their senior year.

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Prerequisite: Grades of B or better in Biology.Students will also be eligible for the following UCONN ECE course: AH 2001: Medical Terminology Introduction and mastery of medical terminology through presentation of word roots, prefixes and suffixes.

This course will focus on learning about the human body from the simple macromolecules to the complex systems that help us function as an organism. Students will learn the structure and function of the major organs and organ systems. Dissection of preserved organisms is an integral part of this course. Students will be expected to learn the terminology pertaining to the structures discussed in this course. This course is designed to allow students to explore the possibility of entering the medical and related health fields.

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Social Studies Curriculum Social studies is the integrated study of history and the social sciences that provides students with a foundation for understanding political institutions, social and cultural perspectives, geography, economic development, participatory citizenship, as well as historical and global perspectives. The social studies curriculum is designed to develop independent, cooperative and critical thinking in order to prepare students to participate productively and responsibility in a technological and rapidly changing global society. Competence in social studies makes it possible for students to understand their past and present and prepare for their future. Requirements: The State of Connecticut requires all students to successfully pass at least one semester of civics and one year of United States History. Additionally, The Morgan School requires a total of 3 credits of Social Studies Link to Social Studies Curriculum

Suggested sequence LEVEL

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

HONORS

US History (Honors)

World History (Honors)

AP US Government

AP Euro History Philosophy

LEVEL 1

US History

World History

Civics

Intro to Criminal Law Psychology

US HISTORY, 1929-PRESENT

Grade 9 #0155 - Level 1 Year 1 credit This course examines United States history from 1929 to the present. Unit topics begin with the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War and continue through the end of the twentieth century to today. The focus is on economic, social, and political issues and emphasizes a critical approach to primary sources and evidence in general.

WORLD HISTORY

Grade 10 #0101-Level 1 Year 1 credit This course examines the foundation and development of human societies from ancient civilizations to the French Revolution. Asian, Middle Eastern, and European units will be explored. The focus is on economic, social, and political issues and emphasizes a critical approach to primary sources and evidence in general.

US HISTORY 1929- PRESENT

Grade 9 #0156 - Honors Year 1 credit In an honors level history course, students are expected to understand the broad conceptual ideas that connect different eras of history. An ability to recognize point of view, bias, and patterns of history are critical for success at this level. This course examines United States history from 1929 to the present. Unit topics begin with the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War and continue through the end of the twentieth century to today. The focus is on economic, social, and political issues and emphasizes a critical approach to primary sources and evidence in general.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

WORLD HISTORY Grade 10 #0103 - Honors Year 1 credit

Pre-requisite: Grade of C or better in United States History

In an honors level history course, students are expected to understand the broad conceptual ideas that connect different eras of history. An ability to recognize point of view, bias, and patterns of history are critical for success at this level. This course examines the foundation and development of human societies from ancient civilizations to the French Revolution. Asian, Middle Eastern, and European units will be explored. The focus is on economic, social, and political issues and emphasizes a critical approach to primary sources and evidence in general.

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

Grade 12 #0184 - Honors - Advanced Placement Year 1 credit

Prerequisites: At least a C average in honors level 10th grade program or at least a B average in 10 grade level 1 social studies course.

This course serves as a full-year introductory class in European history from c. 1450 to the present and prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement examination for possible college credit. Questions on intellectual-cultural, political-diplomatic, and socialeconomic history form the basis for the program and examination.

CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT Grade 11 #0181 - Level 1 Year 1 credit This course is designed to introduce students to the major structures and processes of the American political system. Students will apply knowledge and understanding of civics and government to explore national and global problems. They will also analyze a variety of viewpoints and perspectives on topics related to the study of g o v e r n m e n t . Engagement in activities that promote the development of research, reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills will be a part of the inquiry process.

AP U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS Grade 11, 12 #0182 - Honors - Advanced Placement Year 1 credit

Prerequisites: At least a C average in honors level 10th grade program or at least a B average in 10th grade level 1 social studies course.

This course is a rigorous, college level class that is designed to introduce students to the major structures and processes of the American political system. Students will gain an analytical perspective on U.S. government and politics. This course requires students to do extensive and careful reading of primary and secondary sources, as well as significant writing and critical thinking about the issues studied. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics exam in the spring.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW

Grades 11, 12 #0127 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This course explores criminal law, torts, and the rights and responsibilities of young people. Activities center around an examination of legal procedures, courts, law enforcement and corrections.

PSYCHOLOGY

PHILOSOPHY Grade 12 #0104 - Honors Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: To be accepted into this honors level program the student must have obtained at least a C average in his/ her 11th grade honors level social studies course or at least a B in his/ her 11th grade college prep level social studies course and the department chair’s approval.

Grade 12 #0131 - Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit This course examines the interaction among the biological, mental, and social behavioral aspects of our personality. Besides preparing students to succeed in a college psychology course, a major focus is the practical application of this course to everyday life. Problems of procrastination, goal-setting, motivation and achievement are explored. Practical application of psychology to handling everyday problems as well as goal setting and achievement will be stressed.

This introductory course examines Plato and Aristotle and surveys main trends in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, and logic. Students study Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics as well as selections from other influential Western philosophers.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Technology Education Curriculum Technology education, as part of the total program of education, offers distinct opportunities for students to acquire educational, social, and occupational information and to engage in meaningful activities that will be of assistance in choosing and planning a career. It further helps students to understand and make judgments, regarding the effects of technology on all elements of society and environment in an action-based program. The technology curriculum is designed to help prepare individuals for meeting the requirements of a technological culture. The technology courses offered will help prepare students who are currently a part of the computer generation. Communications, transportation, construction and manufacturing are the core areas of study. Computers are integrated in each area of study to challenge the students and provide a meaningful program of studies. Students follow a systems approach to their work as in business and industry. The program of studies is built upon four areas of learning: 1. Engineering 2. Communications 3. Transportation 4. Construction/Manufacturing Link to Technology Education Curriculum

TECHNOLOGY SEQUENCES: Graphic Communication

Audio/Video Communication

STEM: Engineering

Intro to Communications (S)

Intro to Communications (S)

Advanced Engineering (S)

Digital Imaging I (S)

Video Comm.-Live Broadcast (S) Engineering Design & Development (Y)

Digital Imaging II (S)

Video Production I (S)

Intro to Engineering (S)

Graphic Design (S)

Video Production II (S)

Principles of Engineering (S)

Advanced Graphic Production (S) (S) = Semester

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(Y) = Year

STEM Physics (Y)

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION SEQUENCE INTRO TO COMMUNICATIONS

lenses, lighting, white balance, color balance, and editing using Adobe Camera Raw, Lightroom, and Photoshop Students will create an electronic portfolio (website) of their completed projects.

Prerequisite: None

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0771 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

This introductory course is designed to give students the technical know–how to pursue both the Graphic Communication Sequence and/or the Audio/Video Communication Sequence. Students will gain the “Design” knowledge necessary for content creation, with an eye towards the various “Distribution Methods” (Digital Imaging, Graphic Design and Motion Graphics) for television news broadcast, video production, Web and Commercial Printing. Students will also learn about the various distribution methods and produce a Digital Portfolio (DVD) of their work.

DIGITAL IMAGING I Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0772 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Intro to Communications; or Instructor approval.

This class is the recommended continuation to the Introduction to Communication class. Students photograph images using DSLR cameras. Fundamental principles of digital photography and editing are explored. Students learn key composition techniques, features of the DSLR cameras, and digital editing using Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop Students will create an electronic portfolio (website) of their completed projects.

DIGITAL IMAGING II Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0773 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Intro to Communications; or Instructor approval .

Students with experience in Intro to Communications will work both individually and as a team to produce a variety of projects. Projects will build upon knowledge and skills learned in the Digital Imaging sequence or similar experience. Projects will include the following; Typography, Logo Design, Package Design, Travel Brochures, Restaurant Menus, Concert Posters, Board Games, Magazine, Web Page Layout, and designing for video still graphics. Each student will create a digital portfolio of their completed projects.

ADVANCED GRAPHIC PRODUCTION Grade 10, 11, 12 #0774 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Grades of C or better in Digital Imaging or Graphic Design; or Instructor approval.

Students with experience in Digital Imaging and/or Graphic Design will work both individually and as a team to produce a variety of large volume projects. Projects will build upon knowledge and skills learned in the Communications sequence or similar experience. Projects will include the following: Single and multi-color silk screen prints, commercial vinyl sign production. For a final project students will print a 24 page, 8.5” x 5.5”, book of their design. A large format laser printing allows the students to print single and multicolor projects on 12” x 18” paper media. Students will create a digital portfolio of their work.

#0779 - Level 1 Semester 1⁄2 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Digital Imaging; or Instructor approval.

This class is the recommended continuation to the Digital Imaging I. Students shoot images using DSLR cameras. Students learn advanced camera settings,

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

AUDIO/VISUAL COMMUNICATION SEQUENCE INTRO TO COMMUNICATIONS

VIDEO PRODUCTION I

Prerequisite: None

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Intro to Communications or Instructor approval

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0771 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

This introductory course is designed to give students the technical know–how to pursue both the Graphic Communication Sequence and/or the Audio/Video Communication Sequence. Students will gain the “Design” knowledge necessary for content creation, with an eye towards the various “Distribution Methods” (Digital Imaging, Graphic Design and Motion Graphics) for television news broadcast, video production, Web and Commercial Printing. Students will also learn about the various distribution methods and produce a Digital Portfolio (DVD) of their work.

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0776 – Level 1 Semester 1⁄2 credit

This course is designed to give technical know– how in various types of video production and sound recording. Students learn how to write their own scripts, storyboard and shoot scenes for short films. Students develop camera presence and microphone technique, and they have the opportunity to work with cameras and editing. Student gain practical experience producing commercials, music videos, and public service announcements. Students will produce a Digital Portfolio (Youtube Channel) of their work.

VIDEO PRODUCTION II Grades 10, 11, 12 #0782 – Level 1 Semester 1⁄2 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Video Production I or Instructor approval.

LIVE BROADCAST Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0780 – Level 1 Semester 1⁄2 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Intro to Communications or Instructor approval.

This course is designed to give journalistic and technical know–how in LIVE and prerecorded studio broadcasts. Students not only learn how to write their own television news broadcasts, but some present them live on air to the Morgan community. Students develop camera presence and microphone technique, and they have the opportunity to work with cameras and editing. Students gain practical experience producing both news and feature segments. Student are required to work behind and/or in front of the camera. Broadcasts are viewed daily by the Morgan community, and once a week, lengthier feature stories are presented.

38

Students learn advanced video production and editing techniques. Projects build upon knowledge and skills learned in Intro to Communications and Video Production I. Students focus on advanced camera, lighting, and editing techniques. Projects will include the following: reality tv clips, documentary excerpts, live action shots, and special effects. Students will produce a Digital Portfolio (Youtube Channel) of their work. This course may be taken more than once for additional credit as an I.S., with instructor’s approval. (Audio/Video Communications III, Capstone)

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

STEM-ENGINEERING SEQUENCE INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0751 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit Prerequisite: None

This introductory course is designed to give an overview of engineering concepts for the STEM sequence. Topics covered will include: Design Process, Computer Aided Drafting using SolidWorks, lab/shop safety, engineering challenges, 3D printing, and CNC. Students will also explore engineering principles and careers in the engineering field. This course will introduce students to the engineering basics required for other engineering courses.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0756 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Intro to Engineering or Instructor approval .

Principles of Engineering offers students an opportunity to engage in hands-on design, construction, and engineering activities. These activities teach both mechanical and engineering skills and the science behind the technology. Students will design, build, and test in each of the units. Projects include: building of trebuchets, robotic arms and other engineering projects. Students will use Vex robotics to gain an understanding of mechanics and programming necessary to build a Battlebot robot. Introduction to electronics, including soldering activities will be explored. This course will introduce students to additional engineering basics and tools required for other engineering courses.

ADVANCED ENGINEERING Grades 10, 11, 12 #0757 – Level 1 Semester 1/2 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Intro to Engineering or Principles of Engineering or Instructor approval.

This course may be taken multiple times to continue skill advancement This course is designed to expand on the technical skills developed in Introduction to Engineering and Principles of Engineering. Skills that can be expanded include: CNC, Laser, 3D manufacturing,

CAD, and Electronics, including programming Arduino microprocessors. Students may assist the Engineering Design Class for design and fabrication of components for the Electrathon vehicle, robotics and other projects.

ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Grades 10,11,12 # 0758– Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in at least 2 of the following courses: Intro to Engineering, Principles of Engineering, Advanced Engineering or Instructor approval

In this capstone course, students will work as part of a team to develop a solution to a technical problem of their choosing. They will be able to challenge themselves by trying to solve one of those “don’t you hate it when...” issues of the world. Students will observe a need here at The Morgan School or their community and develop a way to meet that need. They will research, design, test, and construct their solution or recommendations, then present it to industry or community partners. Students and their team will build on skills learned previously to guide them through the process of design and product development. The Innovation Laboratory has the capabilities to build solutions to many different problems. Projects could include competing in state and national competitions such as the Electrathon or creating a prosthetic arm.

STEM PHYSICS Grades 11, 12 #0517 – Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: None

This course is an introduction to Physics, aligning STEM principles (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) into the Physics topics. Emphasis will be on the conceptual and practical applications of Physics. Students will demonstrate the principles of physics through hands on projects and experiments. This course is the advanced course in the STEM Engineering Sequence. STEM Physics is also recommended to students who will be taking Physics or AP Physics in their senior year.

39

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

World Language Curriculum In today’s world of easy travel, access to foreign media, international business, global education, and high-speed communication, the study of world languages is more important than ever. In today’s job market, knowledge of a world language is an important and valuable asset. The study of another language also is critical in our cultural, emotional, and intellectual development. A variety of communicative-approach methods, up-to-date materials and innovative technologies provide students with real world, practical opportunities to learn Spanish and French. The world language curriculum allows students to complete a five-year sequence in French and Spanish if the first year was initiated in a middle school program. Many colleges prefer three, four or even five years of study in the same language. The world language staff strongly recommends that students continue the world language sequence which they have started for a minimum of three years. College Board world language achievement tests may be taken after the fourth year of the sequence. Advance Placement preparation for either the literature or the language version of the test is completed during the fifth year of language study. Students are urged to consult college catalogues for the world language entrance requirements of the school of their choice. A “C-” average in a World Language course is required in order to proceed to the next level. Link to World Language Curriculum

FRENCH FRENCH II Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0205 – Level 1 Year 1 credit

FRENCH III

This course is a continuation of the Eliot School French I program. The study of grammar, vocabulary and culture is continued. Active mastery and conversation continue to be stressed.

Prerequisite: French II

Prerequisite: Completion of French I in 8th grade.

FRENCH II

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0204 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Required minimum score on the French I proficiency test given mid-year in 8th grade, and with the recommendation of current teacher.

This is an intensive course which is designed to develop the students’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Students will continue to study grammar, vocabulary, and culture. The French in Action series and other teacher-produced materials will be used to supplement texts with the objective of further improving the proficiency level of students by means of authentic, current videos.

40

Grade 10, 11, 12 #0228 – Level 1 Year 1 credit

The study of grammar, vocabulary and culture is continued and selections from masterpieces of French literature are introduced. Active mastery and conversation continue to be stressed.

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

FRENCH IV

Grades 11, 12 #0244 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Honors French III or permission of the teacher.

This course stresses composition and discussion by means of an integrated approach to the study of French language, literature, and culture. The primary goal of the course is to improve the students’ proficiency in writing and speaking. The French in Action series and other teacher produced materials will be used to supplement texts with the objective of further improving the proficiency level of students by means of authentic, current videos.

ADVANCED FRENCH Grade 12 #0274 – Honors #0273 – Level 1 Year 1 credit

FRENCH III

Grade 10, 11, 12 #0234 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Honors French II or permission of the teacher.

This course continues to develop skills established in the previous year in an intense and fast-paced program. In addition to speaking and listening skills, stress will be placed on the development of writing skills. Reading selections of classic and modern French prose and poetry will be studied. The study of French culture will include a unit of French art. The French in Action series and other teacher produced materials will be used to supplement texts with the objective of further improving the proficiency level of students by means of authentic, current videos.

Prerequisites: French IV and department approval

This course allows students to continue their progress in reading, composition and conversation in French. It is designed to further familiarize students with French literature and stresses discussion of current topics. The focus of the course is to improve oral and listening proficiency. Students may choose to prepare for the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture examination in this course. If that preparation is undertaken, students will receive honors credit for the class. The successful completion of that examination may lead to college credits and/or placement in advanced courses.

FRENCH IV

Grades 11, 12 #0225 – Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: French III

This course is designed to improve the students’ fluency in French and to continue their progress in reading and comprehension skills while reinforcing grammatical structures. Students will be introduced to some well-known works in French literature.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

SPANISH SPANISH I

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0208 - Level 1 Year 1 credit Spanish I is offered to those students who have not yet begun the study of Spanish or need to repeat the first year in the language sequence. This course is an introduction to Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and Hispanic cultures. Active mastery and conversation are stressed.

SPANISH II

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0231 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish I

This course is a continuation of the Eliot School Spanish I program. The study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture is continued. Active mastery and conversation continue to be stressed.

SPANISH II

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 #0214 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Required minimum score on the Spanish 1 proficiency test given mid-year in 8th grade, and with the recommendation of current teacher.

This is an intensive course which will develop the students’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Short talks and dialogues will be prepared, short readings will be discussed, and short essays and paragraphs will be written in the target language. In addition, students will research the cultures of Latin America. Prerequisites for World Language Honors courses are found in World Language Section.

SPANISH III

Grades 10, 11, 12 #0248 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish II

In this course, readings, including extracts from the works of celebrated authors, will be introduced and supplemented with taped materials. A heightened awareness of Hispanic cultures is developed through the readings. Active mastery and conversation continue to be stressed.

42

SPANISH III

Grades 10, 11, 12 #0224 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Recommendation of teacher and grade of C or above in preceding Spanish class.

This course continues to develop skills established the previous year in an intense and fast- paced program. In addition to speaking and listening skills, stress will be placed on writing compositions, and reading selections of classic and modern Hispanic prose and poetry. Hispanic cultures will be studied throughout the text with an emphasis on Spanish literature.

SPANISH IV

Grades 11, 12 #0258 - Level 1 Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Spanish III

This course is designed to improve the students’ oral proficiency and ability to comprehend spoken and written Spanish. Students will learn to analyze, discuss, and express themselves through contemporary readings, newspaper and magazine articles, and oral and written assignments. The cultural focus is on the historical development of Spain and its people.

The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

SPANISH IV

Grades 11, 12 #0254 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisite: Recommendation of teacher and grade of C or above in preceding Spanish class.

This course is an intensive study of Spanish literature and history from the Middle Ages through the nineteenth century. It will begin an Advanced Placement sequence which can be completed the following year.

AP SPANISH Grade 12 #0284 - Honors Year 1 credit

CURRENT EVENTS OF THE SPANISH SPEAKING WORLD Grades 11, 12 #0256 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisites: Completion of Spanish IV Honors or Spanish IV with a grade of C- or above and recommendation of World Language Teacher.

Come and enrich your speaking and listening abilities through the study and discussion of the social/current issues that encompass the Hispanic world. Through readings and television clips, we will present, debate and understand immigration, border issues, relations between the United States and Cuba, global economy and others.

Prerequisites: Recommendation of teacher and grade of C or above in preceding Spanish class.

This course stresses composition and cultural readings. It is designed to further familiarize students with the great authors of Hispanic literature; to give the students a sense of history and the evolution of the arts; and to continue their progress in the other language skills by means of study, discussion, and analysis of literary works. Students may choose to prepare for the Advanced Placement Spanish language examination in this course. If that preparation is undertaken, students will receive honors credit for the class. The successful completion of that examination may lead to college credits and/or placement in advanced courses.

HISPANIC SHORT STORIES Grades 11, 12 #0257 - Honors Year 1 credit

Prerequisites: Completion of Spanish IV Honors or Spanish IV with a grade of C- or above and recommendation of World Language Teacher.

Lose yourself in the short stories of the Spanish speaking world. Come and learn about the lives of the authors, the countries in which they live/lived and how their circumstances help/helped shape their literature. The 20th and 21st centuries will be the time periods of study.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

Appendices ACCREDITATION STATEMENT The Morgan School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a nongovernmental, nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering post-graduate instruction. Accreditation of an institution by the New England Association indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a peer group review process. An accredited school or college is one which has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation. Accreditation by the New England Association is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of the quality of every course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance about the quality opportunities available to students who attend the institution. Inquiries regarding the status of an institution’s accreditation by the New England Association should be directed to the administrative staff of the school or college. Individuals may also contact the Association: New England Association of Schools and Colleges, 3 Burlington Woods Drive, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803

NON-DISCRIMINATION The Clinton Board of Education does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex or handicap in any of its educational programs. The Clinton Board of Education offers all of its educational programs without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, sex or handicap. The Clinton Board of Education does not discriminate on the basis or race, color, creed, national origin, age, sex, marital status or handicap in establishing and implementing hiring and employment practices and establishing and providing school activities and programs. The Clinton Board of Education offers all vocational programs to students without regard for race, color, creed, national origin, sex, or handicap.

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The Morgan School Program of Studies 2017-2018

THE MORGAN SCHOOL ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM M.A.P. The intent of the program is to prevent at-risk students from withdrawing from high school and to help them achieve a Morgan School diploma. A graduation contract is developed for each student that lists credit requirements, which are the same as the regular day program. Admission to the program is determined by referral to MSAT in conjunction with the student’s parent/ guardian or the student of majority age. See program overview brochure for more information about the program.

Courses*

* The teacher will determine the placement of each student, based on previous work and credits needed for graduation. M.A.P. English I, II, III, Senior Elective 1 credit course Odyssey Ware Online Curriculum Program. M.A.P. Science Physical Science Life Science/Biology 1 credit course Odyssey Ware Online Curriculum Program. M.A.P. Social Studies U.S. History I, II, III, Civics, Psychology 1/2 credit course Odyssey Ware Online Curriculum Program. M.A.P. Mathematics Applied Mathematics Basic Algebra/Basic Geometry 1 credit course Odyssey Ware Online Curriculum Program. M.A.P. Physical Education/Health I, II, III, IV 1/2 credit course Odyssey Ware Online Curriculum Program. M.A.P. Electives 1/2 credit course Will be scheduled as needed. Odyssey Ware Online Curriculum Program.

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Morgan School Program of Studies final 2017.pdf

71 Killingworth Turnpike-Clinton-Connecticut-06413. (860) 664-6504. Click here for the Morgan School Website. GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT. Grades 9 & 10.

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