June 1, 1965

.1. o. BJORKLUND ETAL

3,186,341

IGNITER WITH SEPARATED LAYERS OF EXPLOSIVE

Filed Oct. 6, 1961

John Olaf Bjork/und John Alex Dorge EIdh Gosra Vi/he/m Gusfafsson INVENTORS

ATTORNEYS

Bjdh?il Patented June 1, ‘i965 2 or heat impulse certainly contributes to the sensitivity of the igniter. Ignition occurs even When the thin layer has a very small thickness. Thus a detonating agent layer of 1/2 mm. is suf?cient. Very surprisingly the sensitivity de creases when the layer thickncss is appreciably increased. The greatest thickness which can be used depends, inter alia, on the thickness of the partition wall, but experience has shown that the thickness of the layer should not ex

3,186,341

IGNITER WITH SEPARATED LAYERS OF EXPLUSIVE

John Olaf Bjiirkiund, Helgestavagen 65, Bandhagen, Sweden; John Alex Dorge Eldh, Backashiftsvagen v68, Ensirede, Sweden; and Giista Vilhelm Gustafsson, Satravagen 52, Hagersten, Sweden iled Set. 6, 1961, Ser. No. 143,464 7 Claims. (Cl. 102—S6.5}

An igniter of the conventional type consists of layers of explosive substances contained in a casing, at least one of

10

ceed 4 mm. and is preferably between 1/2 and 1 mm. The most suitable thickness for a partition wall is between 1 and 5 mm. When the thickness of the thin detonating agent layer is between 1/2 and 1 mm, the thickness of the partition wall should be between 1 and 3 mm.

said layers consisting of an igniting primer containing one or a plurality ‘of detonating agents, another usually thinner naaptrz-s layer consisting of an explosive. The object of the det It is possible to use for the partition Wail widely dif onating agent, which has less energy than the explosive, is 15 ferent materials such as metal, plastic, wood, ceramic to ignite the explosive, since, in general, the latter cannot materials, glass, etc. The wall should not however absorb be ignited directly by an external impulse. to an excessively large extent the blast Wave originating Attempts are continuously being made to improve ig from the thin detonating agent layer. When the ignition niters both with respect to sensitivity and explosive effect. is effected by a shock impulse, a soft material should not Sometimes ‘the dimensions are reduced.

In connection

with impact and friction ignition it has been proposed to

be used. The most suitable material is a hard material such as :metal, metal alloys of iron or copper, or glass, but

introduce an inert body into the igniting primer, the body

porcelain or hard plastics may also be used. The hardness ‘serving as an anvil when impact ignition is employed. In of the wall is of special signi?cance in impact ignition such cases the introduced body has prevented dividing the since the wall then serves as an anvil. detonating composition into two layers. It has been con 25 In igniters which are ignited solely by a detonating sidered important that communication between the ignit wave a special advantage is obtained in that the thin det ing layers on both sides of the body be unbroken. In onating agent layer does not have to contain a detonat igniter-s which are not designed to be ignited by pins ex ing agent of an extremely sensitive type, for example tri tending into the ignite-r there was no cause for introducing cinate, as is usual. It is, for example, advantageous to an inert body of any kind into the igniter primer. So far use only lead azide both in the thin detonating agent layer as the improvement of the blasting effect of the igniter is and in the main detonating agent. In this way the risks concerned, there was normally no other possibility than to accompanying the use of such an extremely sensitive det ‘select vmore efficient explosives or to increase the quantity onation explosive are avoided without reducing the sen of the same.

sitivity of the igniter to the intended impulse.

The present invention relates to an igniter adapted to be ignited by a shock impulse, for example by impact or a detonation wave, or by a heat impulse, for example an

also possible to e?ect ignition by mechanical impact

ignition ?ame, electric spark or incandescent ?lament, and in which increased ignition sensitivity and explosive effect is obtained. The invention is characterised in that a partition wall made of explosively inert material is ar

ranged in good contact with a main detonating agent layer and that a thin layer of a detonating agent is arranged on the outside of said wall. Furthermore this partition Wall is ?tted in the casing to form a dividing wall or parti

tion between the thin detonating agent layer and the main detonating agent layer on the other side of the wall to prevent free ignition communication between said two layers.

'

Such an igniter has proved to have a substantially in creased sensitivity; for example it is ignited at an appre ciably greater distance from a given source of ‘a detona tion wave or by a less intensive ignition ?ame.

The ex

In an igniter according to the present invention it is

without the use of a pin projecting into the detonating agent. Owing to defects in construction and control, in the use of such a pin often results in unreliable ignition. In a suitable embodiment of an igniter according to the invention a body is mounted for this purpose outside

the thin detonating agent layer, and the surface of the body that faces the explosive layer is provided with a

coating containing sharp-edged, hard and preferably‘ brittle granules, for example of glass, the size of which exceeds the thickness of the thin detonating agent layer. The body must be movable towards the layer, for ex

ample bodily displaceable or pivotable. It is preferably constituted by a washer or foil which is forced into the casing and which may possibly serve as an end closure

for the igniter. The coated surface of the body may be planar or convex towards the detonating agent layer. When the outside of the granule coated body is struck,

plosive effect is also improved to a substantial degree. it is moved towards the detonating agent layer and the The reason for this improvement has not been fully dis 55 granules are forced through the layer towards the parti covered. It is however clear that it is caused to a sub tion. The granules act as a large number of teethpoints stantial degree by the partition wall inserted in the igniter. and the wall as an anvil, whereby reliable and rapid This partition acts as a barrier to the detonation wave ignition is obtained, particularly if the granules are very from the thin detonating agent layer. The detonation hard and brittle so that they are shattered on striking the 60 wave probably achieves sufficient ignition strength only wall. A condition for efficient operation of this igni after the greater part of the detonating agent layer has tion system is undoubtedly the small thickness required been ignited. The detonation wave as it passes through by the invention of the thin detonating agent layer. the wall then ignites the detonating agent on the other side In such an igniter ignition occurs to a large extent of the partition simultaneous-1y over the whole of its sur independently of the shape of the object which strikes the 65 face contacting said wall.

As a result the time neces

sary for the acceleration of combustion in the latter det onating agent to full detonation speed is reduced. Any

signi?cant delay in the ignition of the thin detonating

granule coated body in the igniter. A disadvantage is

the risk of accidental ignition.

This risk can however

be eliminated, conveniently by ?tting a protective wall

in the form of a disc or strip, which is removable side ways through a slit in the casing of the igniter, between 70 the great speed at which this layer is fully ignited. The the granule coated surface and the detonating agent layer. agent layer should not on the other hand, occur owing to

ease with which the thin ignition layer is ignited by shock

An igniter of the above type may likewise be used when

3,186,841 =3)

designated in the same manner, The partition is made of steel, glass or similar hard material. The end closure 12 is made of aluminum or plastic foil which is ?tted to

ignition is effected by a detonation wave, for example from an impact fuze.

The present invention is also applicable in connection

with electrical ignition. In previously used igniters the impulse producing part of the electrical pole system is imbedded in the detonating agent, whereby ignition

01

the end of the casing, for example by bonding. On its inner side this foil is provided with a coating containing

sharp-edged, substantially freely projecting granules 12', preferably having a size which exceeds the thickness of the detonating agent layer 3 so that the points of the gran

progresses from one point in all directions which results in a delayed acceleration of the combustion up to deto

nation speed.

ules, when subjected to an external impact or pressure im

However, the impulse producing parts of the pole

10

pulse against the foil 12, are caused to penetrate the layer,

system do not have to be imbedded in the detonation

the partition wall 4 then serving as an anvil. Between

composition. It is su?icient if they are in good contact with the layer of the detonating agent. According to one embodiment of the present invention the electrical pole system is mounted in the casing of the igniter on the outside of the thin detonating agent layer

the granule coating 12’ and ‘the detonating agent layer 3 there is ?tted a safety disc 2' which is removable sideways,

so that the impulse producing parts of the pole system

partition and the base end closure are designated as in

so as to be withdrawn from the casing 5 through a slit in

the wall of the casing. In FIG. 3 also, the casing, detonating agent layers, the

FIG. 1. A cylindrical body containing a pole system for spark ignition is arranged in the casing 5. This body con . rounded with beads of a detonating agent but may also 20 sists of a conductive pole sleeve 13 and a pole pin 15, which is ?xed in. the sleeve by a ?lling 14 of enamel or be pole ends for producing an electric spark. In the plastic. The cylindrical body is arranged with its two latter case the one pole is preferably shaped as a ring poles in contact with the detonating agent layer 3. The which is concentrically ?xed in the end of the casing of the latter consists of silver or lead azide having a 3% addi igniter in good contact with the wall of the casing, and are in contact with said layer. The impulse producing member may be an incandescent wire, ‘preferably sur

the other pole is in the form of a central rod inserted into

this ring and insulated therefrom, for example by a plastic ring. In this embodiment a good and reliable contact be

tween the pole system and the detonating agent layer may be achieved. 'In these embodiments of an igniter in which ignition is initiated by a heat impulse, either by an ig- “ nition ?ame or heat, which is produced in connection

_ tion of graphite for promoting the spark formation. The igniters illustrated are adapted to ignite a blast ing charge, but may also be used for igniting other ex plosive products, such as pyrotechnics, in which case the

explosive layer 7 may be omitted. Further detonating agent layers of other explosives may be included in the

igniter.

‘with electric ignition, the thin detonating agent layer

The invent-ion is not restricted to the illustrated em

should contain a substance sensitive to the ignition ?ame, ‘for example tricinate, which on the other hand does not

bodiments, and a plurality of modi?cations may be adopted within the scope of the claims.

have to be included in the other detonating composition. This is a great advantage, inter alia, from the manufactur ing point of view.

,

What we claim is:

1. An igniter comprising a sleeve, end closures at op posite ends thereof, a main detonating layer containing a detonating agent, a thin detonating layer containing a deto

The invention will now be described in greater detail nating agent, and a partition wall of explosively inert ma with’ reference to the accompanying drawings, which illus trate three embodiments of an igniter according to the in 40 terial arranged between the two detonating layers so as to ?ll the total cross-section of said sleeve to prevent free vention.

'

'

FIG. 1 is a vertical cross sectional view of an igniter

ignition communication between said detonating layer; said main detonating layer being in contact with the entire

which may be considered the basic form and is adapted to be used for ignition by a detonation wave, for example

area of one .face of said partition wall, said thin detonat—

by a blast jet from a fuze or by a heat impulse, for ex

ing layer being arranged in contact with the entire area

ample an ignition ?ame. FIG. 2 shows a similar view of an igniter which is ig nited by impact but which also may be ignited by a deto

of a second face of said partition wall, and having a thick ness which is less than the thickness of the partition wall. 2. An igniter comprising a sleeve containing a detonat

nation wave.

ing material, a non-explosive partition wall embedded in said detonating material, said partition wall having an

FIG. 3 shows a similar view of an igniter for electrical . ignition by means of a spark. -

The igniter according to FIG. 1 has a cylindrical metal casing 5 with openings 1 and 9 at its ends. In this metal casing there are located two layers 3 and 6 of detonating agents, mainly consisting of lead azide or silver azide, a blasting explosive layer 7 of trotyl or other usual secon dary blasting explosive and an approximately 2 mm. thick partition of metal, for example of copper or iron. This metal partition 4 is arranged to separate the two layers of

detonating agents from each other. The detonatingagent (it) layer 3 forms an approximately 0.75 mm. thin layer which is applied to the front side of the partition wall. At the

opening 1 the layer 3 of the detonating agent is covered by an aluminum foil 2, and the lower end of the trotyl layer 7 as seen in FIG. 1 is covered by a disk 8 of metal

area which completely ?lls the total cross-section of said sleeve to divide the detonating material into a thin layer and a main layer, said thin layer being an initiating charge

layer covering one face of said partition wall, said main layer being thicker than said?rst layer and being in direct contact with the opposite face of said partition wall where by the main detonating layer is ignited only after the greater part of the thin detonating layer has been ignited, and said thin layer having a thickness less than the thick ness of said partition wall.

'

3. An igniter comprising a sleeve containing a deto

nating material, a non-explosive partition wall embedded in said detonating material, said partition wall having an area which completely ?lls the total cross-section of said sleeve to divide the detonating material into a thin layer

and a main layer, said thin layer being an initiating charge

or plastic located at the lower end of the casing 5. layer covering one face of said partition wall, said main In this embodiment the igniter is adapted to be ignited layer being thicker than said ?rst layer and being in direct by a pressure wave, for example a detonating wave from contact with the opposite face of said partition wall where a fuze. For ignition by ?ame the thin detonating agent by the main detonating layer is ignited only after the layer 3 ought to contain an additive of tricinate for in 70 greater part of the thin detonating layer has been ignited, creasing the ignition sensitivity. and said thin layer having a thickness less than the thick The igniter according to FIG. 2 has a metal casing ness of said partition wall, said thin layer having a thick with end closures, contains detonation and layers and a ness substantially between 0.5 mm. and 1 mm. and said partition, the parts of which are of substantially the same partition wall having a thickness substantially between 1 mm. and 3 mm. ' character as in the igniter of FIG. 1, and are therefore

8,186,841

5 4. An igniter comprising a sleeve, end closures at op posite ends thereof, a main detonating layer containing a detonating agent, a thin detonating layer containing a deto

6 having an area which ?lls the total cross-section of said sleeve to prevent free ignition communication between said

detonating layers, said internal igniting means comprising

nating agent, a partition wall of non-explosive material ar

a body facing said thin layer and spaced a small distance

ranged between the two detonating layers, internal igniting means for igniting said thin detonating layer, said main detonating layer being in contact with the entire area of

from said thin layer, said body being movable toward said thin layer, the surface of said body being provided with a coating containing hard, brittle granules, said mov

one face of said partition wall, said thin detonating layer

able body comprising a foil forming one of said sleeve end closures, and a protective sheet adapted to be removed of said partition wall, said partition wall having an area 10 from the ign-iter through said slot in said sleeve. which ?lls the total cross-section of said sleeve to prevent References Cited by the Examiner ‘free ignition communication between said detonating lay ers and said thin layer having a thickness less than the UNITED STATES PATENTS thickness of said partition wall. 170,780 12/75 Smoot _____________ __ 102-—86.5 5. An igniter according to claim 4 wherein said partition 643,974 2/00 Parker ____________ __ 102-865 wall is made of hard material to enable said partition wall being in contact with the entire area of a second face

to serve as an anvil.

6. An igniter according to claim 5, wherein said thin layer has a thickness substantially between 0.5 mm. and 1

mm., and the partition wall has a thicknes substantially be 20 tween 1 mm. and 3 mm.

7. An igniter comprising a sleeve having a slot therein, end closures at opposite ends thereof, a main detonating

layer containing a detonating agent, a thin detonating layer containing a detonating agent, a partition Wall of non-ex 25

plosive material arranged between the two detonating lay ers, internal igniting means for igniting said thin detonat ing layer, said main detonating layer being in contact with the entire area of one face of said partition wall, said thin

2,068,516 2,361,955 2,429,490 2,441,248 2,696,191 2,703,531 2,801,585 2,823,609 2,921,520

1/37 11/44 10/47

5/48 10/51 3/55 8/57 2/58 1/ 60

Seavey _____________ __ 102-—-—86.5 Moore et al ___________ __ 102——73 Scherrer ____________ __ 102-—28 Morris et a1. _______ __ 102-865 Sheehan ____________ __ 102—86.5 raumann et al. ______ __ 102——73 Smith ______________ __ 102—28 Johnson et a1 _________ __ 102~27 Stone‘strom __________ __ 102—28

FOREKGN PATENTS

3 78,769

8/23 Germany.

SAMUEL FEINBERG, Primary Examiner.

detonating layer being in contact with the entire area of 3 a second face of said partition wall, said partition wall 0 ARTHUR M. HORTON, Examiner.

John Olaf Bjork/und

from the ign-iter through said slot in said sleeve. References Cited by the Examiner. UNITED STATES PATENTS. 170,780 12/75 Smoot ______ __ 102-—86.5.

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