HORTICULTURAL REVIEWS Volume 38

Horticultural Reviews is sponsored by: American Society of Horticultural Science International Society for Horticultural Science

Editorial Board, Volume 38 Harry S. Paris Hilde Nybom Dan Cantliffe

HORTICULTURAL REVIEWS Volume 38

edited by

Jules Janick Purdue University

Copyright Ó 2011 by Wiley-Blackwell. All rights reserved. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey Published simultaneously in Canada Wiley-Blackwell is an imprint of John Wiley & Sons, formed by the merger of Wiley’s global Scientific, Technical, and Medical business with Blackwell Publishing. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc., 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, 978-750-8400, fax 978-750-4470, or on the web at www.copyright.com. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, 201-748-6011, fax 201-748-6008, or online at http://www.wiley.com/go/permission. Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. For general information on our other products and services or for technical support, please contact our Customer Care Department within the United States at 877-762-2974, outside the United States at 317-572-3993 or fax 317- 572-4002. Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic formats. For more information about Wiley products, visit our web site at www.wiley.com. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data ISBN 978-0-470-64470-6 (cloth) ISSN 0163-7851 Printed in the United States of America oBook ISBN: 978-0-470-87236-9 ePDF ISBN: 978-0-470-87237-6 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Contents

Contributors Dedication: Maxine M. Thompson

ix xiii

Kim Hummer

1. Biology and Physiology of Vines

1

Kevin C. Vaughn and Andrew J. Bowling I. Introduction II. Evolution and Taxonomic Distribution of Vines III. Classification of Vines IV. How Is Touch Perceived? V. Light Perception and Finding a Support VI. Genetic Approaches VII. Summary and Conclusions Literature Cited

2. Origin and Dissemination of Almond

1 3 3 13 15 16 16 18

23

Thomas M. Gradziel I. Introduction II. Classification III. Wild Badam IV. Cultivated Greek Nut V. Old World Dissemination VI. New World Dissemination VII. Global Commerce VIII. Evolving Requisites for Commercial Almond IX. Conclusions Literature Cited

23 24 32 39 42 59 61 66 71 73

v

vi

CONTENTS

3. Factors Affecting Extra-Virgin Olive Oil Composition

83

Paolo Inglese, Franco Famiani, Fabio Galvano, Maurizio Servili, Sonia Esposto, and Stephania Urbani I. The Concept of Olive Oil Quality II. EVOO Composition and Nutritional Properties III. Sources of Variability of EVOO Composition and Properties IV. Agronomical and Environmental Factors Affecting EVOO Composition and Quality V. Technological Factors Affecting EVOO Composition and Quality VI. Summary and Conclusions Literature Cited

4. Quality and Yield Responses of Deciduous Fruits to Reduce Irrigation

84 86 95 97 121 130 132

149

M. H. Behboudian, J. Marsal, J. Girona, and G. Lopez I. Introduction II. Definitions III. Stone Fruits IV. Pome Fruits V. Conclusions and Future Prospects Literature Cited

5. Hot Water Treatments of Fruits and Vegetables for Postharvest Storage

150 151 152 166 180 181

191

Elazar Fallik I. Introduction II. Hot Water Technologies III. Combination Treatments IV. Hot Water Treatments and Fresh Cut V. Summary and Conclusions Literature Cited

192 193 197 204 205 206

CONTENTS

6. Promotion of Adventitious Root Formation of Difficult-to-Root Hardwood Tree Species

vii

213

Paula M. Pijut, Keith E. Woeste, and Charles H. Michler I. Introduction II. Genetics and Physiology of Adventitious Root Formation III. Controllable Factors That Affect Rooting of Cuttings IV. Case Study of Horticultural versus Forest Tree Species Literature Cited

7. Water and Nutrient Management in the Production of Container-Grown Ornamentals

215 218 227 239 243

253

John C. Majsztrik, Andrew G. Ristvey, and John D. Lea-Cox I. Introduction II. Soilless Substrates III. Nutrients IV. Water V. Conclusions Literature Cited

8. World Vegetable Industry: Production, Breeding, Trends

254 258 261 273 286 288

299

Jo~ ao Silva Dias and Edward J. Ryder I. Introduction II. The Worldwide Vegetable Industry III. Vegetable Production Strategies IV. Vegetable Breeding V. Summary and Conclusions Literature Cited

300 303 319 324 345 348

9. Regulation of Anthocyanin Accumulation in Apple Peel

357

Adriana Telias, James M. Bradeen, James J. Luby, Emily E. Hoover, and Andrew C. Allen I. Introduction II. Apple Peel Color

358 358

viii

CONTENTS

III. Genetic Control of Anthocyanin Accumulation IV. Factors Affecting Anthocyanin Accumulation V. Mechanisms Affecting Anthocyanin Accumulation Patterns VI. Conclusions Literature Cited

363 370 376 383 384

Subject Index

393

Cumulative Subject Index

395

Cumulative Contributor Index

423

Contributors

Andrew C. Allan Plant and Food Research, Mt Albert Research Centre, Private Bag 92169, Auckland, New Zealand M.H. Behboudian Institute of Natural Resources (INR 433), Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand Andrew J. Bowling Dow AgroSciences, 9330 Zionsville Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46268, USA James M. Bradeen Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA Jo~ ao Silva Dias Technical University of Lisbon, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal Sonia Esposto Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-estimative e degli Alimenti, Sezione di Tecnologie e Biotecnologie degli Alimenti, Universit a degli Studi di Perugia 06121, Perugia, Italy Elazar Fallik Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, P.O.Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel Franco Famiani Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie e Ambientali, Universit a degli Studi di Perugia, Borgo XX Giugno, 74, 06121, Perugia, Italy Fabio Galvano Dipartimento di Chimica Biologica, Chimica Medica e Biologia Molecolare, Universita degli Studi di Catania, 95125 Catania, Italy J. Girona Irrigation Technology, Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroaliment aries, 191 Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure, E-25198 Lleida, Spain Thomas M. Gradziel Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA Emily E. Hoover Department of Horticultural Science, University of Minnesota, 305A Alderman Hall, 1970 Folwell Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA Kim Hummer USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository, Corvallis, OR 97333, USA Paolo Inglese Dipartimento di Colture Arboree, Universit a degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italy John D. Lea-Cox Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, 2120 Plant Sciences Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA

ix

x

CONTRIBUTORS

G. Lopez Irrigation Technology, Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroaliment aries, 191 Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure, E-25198 Lleida, Spain James J. Luby Department of Horticultural Science, University of Minnesota, 305A Alderman Hall, 1970 Folwell Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA John C. Majsztrik Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, 2120 Plant Sciences Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA J. Marsal Irrigation Technology, Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroaliment aries, 191 Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure, E-25198 Lleida, Spain Charles H. Michler USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center, Purdue University, 715 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA Paula M. Pijut USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center, Purdue University, 715 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA Andrew G. Ristvey Wye Research and Education Center, 124 Wye Narrows Drive, Queenstown, MD 21658, USA Edward J. Ryder 77 Paseo Hermoso, Salinas, CA 93908, USA Maurizio Servili Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-estimative e degli Alimenti, Sezione di Tecnologie e Biotecnologie degli Alimenti, Universit a degli Studi di Perugia 06121, Perugia, Italy Adriana Telias Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA Stefania Urbani Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-estimative e degli Alimenti, Sezione di Tecnologie e Biotecnologie degli Alimenti, Universit a degli Studi di Perugia 06121, Perugia, Italy Kevin C. Vaughn USDA-ARS-SWSRU, PO Box 350, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA Keith E. Woeste USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center, Purdue University, 715 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA

Maxine M. Thompson

Dedication: Maxine M. Thompson Volume 38 of Horticultural Reviews is dedicated to Dr. Maxine M. Thompson, world-renowned horticulturist and plant explorer. Maxine was born on November 3, 1926, in Bloomington, Illinois. After a few years in Illinois and Minnesota, her family moved to Pasadena, California, where she was raised. She received an Associate of Arts degree from Pasadena Junior College in 1945, a BS in Plant Science in 1948, an MS in Horticulture (Pomology) in 1951, and a PhD in Genetics in 1960, all from the University of California–Davis. While in graduate school, she married Harry S. Thompson, a student in the veterinary college, and had two children, Michael and Laurie. From 1960 to 1964, Dr. Thompson took a position as a part-time junior specialist in the Viticulture Department at the University of California–Davis while simultaneously caring for her young children. In 1964, she accepted a position as assistant professor in biology at Wisconsin State College-Oshkosh, where she taught general botany, cytology, and genetics. In 1965, she moved to Corvallis, Oregon, where she had a series of temporary appointments in the Department of Botany and the Department of Horticulture. In 1969, she became Assistant Professor of Horticulture, the first woman to be appointed to a tenuretrack position in that department. Her major research activities involved fruit breeding and genetics of hazelnut and sweet cherry, floral biology, pollination, fruit set, and cytological studies of fruit and nut species. Her teaching responsibilities included undergraduate classes in general botany and fruit systematics, and graduate classes in plant genetics, pollination, and fruit set. During her assignment at Oregon State University, Dr. Thompson was an excellent mentor to graduate students. She provided a friendly face, generous use of laboratory equipment, and helpful advice whenever students visited her fourth-floor lab. In difficult times she spoke up for those who faced the complexities of balancing a professional career while managing a young family. Dr. Thompson has had a fascination with wild and cultivated plant variation. This interest was born in a freshman general botany class and has expanded over many years to her current project, breeding blue honeysuckle, Lonicera caerulea L. Dr. Thompson was one of the xiii

xiv

DEDICATION

founding scientists for the first clonal genebank in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) to be established in Corvallis, Oregon, in 1981. For many years she participated on the Technical Committees for the National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis, and the Western Regional Plant Introduction Station, Pullman, Washington. Her international genetic resources activities began with consultancies with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 1982. She was hired to assess underutilized fruits and nuts in six southeastern Asian countries (India, Nepal, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines). She was assigned to a second consultancy that assessed fruit and nut genetic resources in Pakistan. Her objective was to recommend plant collection expeditions and design a plan for clonal genebanks in that country. In 1986, she retired from her faculty position at Oregon State to embark on a series of U.S. Department of Agriculture–sponsored international plant explorations for fruit and nut genetic resources. Her first trip, in 1987, was a six-month expedition to the mountains of northern Pakistan, a region adjacent to Central Asia and rich in diversity of fruit and nut species. Next, she accompanied Dr. Calvin Sperling, USDA Plant Explorer, to Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kazakhstan to collect apricots, cherries, peaches, plums, and apples. That same year she and Dr. Jim Ballington traveled to Ecuador to collect Rubus, Vaccinium, and other members of the Ericaceae with potential ornamental value. In 1992, she led an expedition to the southwest of the People’s Republic of China to collect blackberries and raspberries in Guizhou Province. She then traveled to Kyrgystan in 1994 to collect walnuts. In 1996, she returned to the People’s Republic of China, this time to the northeast, leading the expedition to collect small fruit germplasm in Jilin and Heilongjian provinces with collaborators Chad Finn and Joseph Postman. Her final two expeditions occurred in 1998, to eastern Siberia, Russia, and in 2000, to Hokkaido, Japan, to obtain blue honeysuckle. As a result of her plantcollecting expeditions, Dr. Thompson has donated 645 accessions (seeds and plants) to the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System. In 1997, Dr. Thompson was honored with the Crop Science Society’s Frank M. Meyer Medal for Plant Genetic Resources, and, in 2000, with the American Pomological Society’s Wilder Medal. The high caliber of Dr. Thompson’s science continues to be recognized. Fruit breeders and students of pomology study her Rubus cytogenetics manuscripts as seminal. Her manuscripts on the floral biology and nondormancy of hazelnut continue to be frequently cited. Her research into incompatibility in hazelnuts provided techniques for standard tests now used by several generations of nut breeders. The

DEDICATION

xv

Oregon State University’s hazelnut breeding program released three main crop cultivars (‘Willamette,’ ‘Lewis’, and ‘Clark’), four pollinizers with complete resistance to eastern filbert blight (VR 4-31, VR 11-27, VR 20-11, and VR 23-18), and one red-leafed ornamental (‘Rosita’). Each of these resulted from crosses made by Dr. Thompson. ‘Lewis’ is now the most widely planted cultivar in Oregon, and demand far exceeds what nurseries can propagate. Since her final plant-collecting expedition in 2000, Dr. Thompson embarked on the breeding of blue honeysuckle, which is called “haskap” in Hokkaido. For the past decade she obtained plant material from Russia and Japan, and has been making crosses between subspecies, planting out thousands of seedlings, and selecting improved genotypes suited to the Willamette Valley, Oregon. Now retired, she is unsalaried in this task but continues the program, supplemented with small research grants out of her love and devotion to horticulture. Maxine’s fierce independence and sharp scientific mind have led to a remarkable horticultural career. Her work spanned a score of years when our society’s concept of women in the workplace greatly changed. When she began, women worked very hard to be noticed professionally and were offered lower salaries than were received by male counterparts. Those of us who have come along since then take for granted that our abilities are considered on an equal par with other qualified individuals. The outstanding work of women like Maxine Thompson has brought about this change. Dr. Maxine M. Thompson—geneticist, horticulturalist, professor, world explorer, and mentor—continues to inspire us. Kim E. Hummer USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository Corvallis, Oregon

HORTICULTURAL REVIEWS, Volume 38 - Dedication: Maxine M ...

HORTICULTURAL REVIEWS, Volume 38 - Dedication: Maxine M. Thompson .pdf. HORTICULTURAL REVIEWS, Volume 38 - Dedication: Maxine M. Thompson ...

978KB Sizes 36 Downloads 39 Views

Recommend Documents

Dedication checklist.pdf
Page 1 of 1. Dedication checklist.pdf. Dedication checklist.pdf. Open. Extract. Open with. Sign In. Main menu. Displaying Dedication checklist.pdf. Page 1 of 1.

Horticultural Oils.pdf
by the distillation temperature range of the product. ... By Dr. Heidi Kratsch and Wendy Hanson Mazet, University of Nevada ... Displaying Horticultural Oils.pdf.

Dedication Ad Sample.pdf
Page 1 of 1. Dedication Ad Sample.pdf. Dedication Ad Sample.pdf. Open. Extract. Open with. Sign In. Main menu. Displaying Dedication Ad Sample.pdf.

Child-Dedication-FAQ-11.18.15.pdf
Jerusalem to present him to the Lord (Luke 2:22). Hannah ... Since God is both creator and sustainer of each child's life (Psalm 127:3; Psalm. 139), it is ... We encourage you to invite as many family members and friends as you like to. celebrate wit

TFP #30 The Dedication - Insight for Living
great illustration of what happens when God gives us gifts and we dedicate them to Him. ... a part of the story arc, which means there is a setup at the beginning and end of the episode ... lifestyle, but it did not have much effect on my worldview.

ePub Conducting Research Literature Reviews: Volume 4 Read Books
... Data Discman an electronic book reader that could read e books that were .... Case studies in the use of major online databases (e.g., the Web of Science) -.

North Shore Horticultural Society
Drinks, paper goods, and flat- ware will be provided by the Society. (Please do not bring alcoholic bever- ... Virtual Garden. Tour in January? ___. Manchester His- torical Museum is doing an exhibit of the founding and history of the. NSHS. The ex-

Phoenix Arizona Temple Dedication Prayer.pdf
Page 1. Whoops! There was a problem loading more pages. Phoenix Arizona Temple Dedication Prayer.pdf. Phoenix Arizona Temple Dedication Prayer.pdf.

Child-Dedication-FAQ-11.18.15.pdf
There was a problem previewing this document. Retrying... Download. Connect more apps... Try one of the apps below to open or edit this item. Child-Dedication-FAQ-11.18.15.pdf. Child-Dedication-FAQ-11.18.15.pdf. Open. Extract. Open with. Sign In. Mai

The Jewish Temple: Impressive Dedication Ceremony, 1870
Page 1. B'nai Sholom Temple (Quincy, Ill.)., Nearprint Geographic, American Jewish Archives, Cincinnati, Ohio.

TFP #30 The Dedication - Insight for Living
process. Once that is accomplished, you can then translate them into appropriate answers for your kids. Lesson. Being a Good Steward of God's Gifts. Key Verse.

Phoenix Arizona Temple Dedication Prayer.pdf
Phoenix Arizona Temple Dedication Prayer.pdf. Phoenix Arizona Temple Dedication Prayer.pdf. Open. Extract. Open with. Sign In. Main menu.

Dr.Y.S.R. Horticultural University Recruitment [email protected] ...
Page 3 of 17. Dr.Y.S.R. Horticultural University Recruitment [email protected] Dr.Y.S.R. Horticultural University Recruitment [email protected] Open.