GEORGE MASON HIGH SCHOOL A Falls Church City Public School

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 2017 - 2018 7124 Leesburg Pike Falls Church, Virginia 22043 (703) 248-5500 www.fccps.org/gm

A Letter from Our Principal Dear Mustang, Planning for your academic future is one of the most important responsibilities you will have as a student at George Mason High School. Course selection serves as an opportunity for you to collaborate with teachers, counselors, and parents to chart your academic path. It is vital to your success that you carefully vet each course to ensure that you accept the appropriate academic challenge. George Mason offers every student the opportunity to select from a wide range of courses. You have the freedom to select those courses that best suit your personal interests and academic capacity. Providing you with this freedom requires that you thoughtfully consider the academic commitment necessary to be successful, and utilize personal maturity and a willingness to engage others in substantive conversations regarding course selections. You will be required to reflect on both the knowledge and skills you have previously mastered as well as the important behaviors required for success. Teachers and counselors will serve as your best resources regarding course requirements in terms of effort and engagement above and beyond regular requirements. Are you prepared for this challenge? Are you committed to doing what is required to demonstrate mastery of the content? Have you developed the maturity to engage all resources to increase your understanding of the various subject matter that George Mason offers? Following are some of the resources we have instituted to help you be successful in any course: Mustang Block, Educational Support Room, writing lab, and others. Long-term success also relies on you and requires your very best efforts. We expect all Mustangs to excel in Mind, Body, and Character. This requires students to reflect on their personal goals for their high school career. We expect a healthy, well balanced high school experience for all students. This may include joining an athletic team or club, being a member of the student government, or assisting with our IT team. Please consider what motivates you when choosing between class offerings. We have a long-standing and well-earned reputation as an exemplary academic and social institution. Our collective commitment to each of our students sets us apart from other schools. You are important to us, and we are committed to helping you prepare for life after high school. Make certain you have the academic and social experiences you need to be prepared for the challenge and promise of tomorrow.

Sincerely,

Matt Hills Principal

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Table of Contents General Information..................................................................................................................................... 6 Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 6 Academic Requirements and Procedures ................................................................................................. 7 Academic/Athletic Eligibility ................................................................................................................... 20 Recognition of Student Achievement ..................................................................................................... 21 Special Programs ..................................................................................................................................... 23 Program of Study Course Sequence........................................................................................................ 24 International Baccalaureate ...................................................................................................................... 25 Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 26 Middle Years Programme (MYP) ............................................................................................................. 26 Diploma Programme (DP) ....................................................................................................................... 26 Sample Course of Study for IB Diploma .................................................................................................. 31 Course Descriptions.................................................................................................................................... 33 Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 34 Arts .......................................................................................................................................................... 35 Design (Career and Technical Education) ............................................................................................... 40 English Learners (EL) ............................................................................................................................... 44 Individuals and Societies (Social Studies)................................................................................................ 45 Interdisciplinary Electives ....................................................................................................................... 47 Language and Literature (English) .......................................................................................................... 52 Language Acquisition (World Languages) ............................................................................................... 55 Mathematics ........................................................................................................................................... 60 Physical and Health Education ................................................................................................................ 63 Sciences ................................................................................................................................................... 64 Special Education .................................................................................................................................... 68 General Elective Courses......................................................................................................................... 69 Arlington Career Center (ACC) ................................................................................................................ 71

Introduction George Mason High School has served students in grades 9-12 since the inception of the Falls Church City Public School System in 1949. Offering a wide range of educational options, the school serves approximately 800 students. This booklet provides information for parents and students about George Mason High School (GMHS) course offerings, academic programs, and graduation requirements. Course descriptions, recommendations, and prerequisites are intended to help students and parents make decisions about a program of studies appropriate for each student’s needs. To answer specific questions and to select the most appropriate classes, students and parents are encouraged to contact the appropriate counselor and/or current teacher.

Declaration of Nondiscrimination Equal educational opportunities shall be available for all students, without regard to race, national origin, religion, color, sex, disability, sexual orientation, or marital or parental status in admission, access to, or treatment in its programs or activities. Inquiries should be directed to Ms. Lisa High, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum Innovation and Personnel, 800 West Broad Street, Falls Church, Virginia, 22046, (703) 248-5600.Individuals with disabilities who require assistance or special arrangements to participate in a program or activity sponsored by the Falls Church City Public Schools should contact Ms. Elizabeth Germer at (703) 248-5635. We request that you provide 48 hours’ notice so that the proper arrangements may be made.

School System Organization Central Office Dr. Robert Schiller Ms. Lisa High Mr. Hunter Kimble Ms. Elizabeth Germer Ms. Patricia Minson Ms. Jeanne Seabridge Mr. Adam Amerine

(703) 248-5600 Interim Superintendent Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum Innovation and Personnel Assistant Superintendent of Finance and Operations Director of Special Education and Student Services Chief of Legal Services Assistant Director of Teaching, Learning, and Achievement Testing Coordinator

Administration Mr. Matt Hills Mr. Kevin Clark Mr. Dave Serensits Ms. Shana Curtis

(703) 248-5500 Principal Assistant Principal Assistant Principal Dean of Students

Athletics Ms. Julie Bravin Mr. Bryan Harris

(703) 248-5598 Athletic Director Assistant Athletic Director

Counseling Department Ms. Amy S. Kurjanowicz Ms. Valerie Chesley Ms. Ilana Reyes Mr. Brad McAdam Ms. Mica Thomasson Mr. Bob Palermo Ms. Yesmar Oyarzun Ms. Beth Ann Bird Ms. Monica Gomez

(703) 248-5525 Director of Counseling Counselor Counselor Counselor Counselor College/Career Coordinator Counseling Secretary Registrar Pathway to the Baccalaureate Counselor

IB Coordinators Mr. Daniel A. Coast Ms. Laura Lane

(703) 248-5525 IB Diploma Programme Coordinator IB Middle Years Programme Coordinator 6

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES

School Day Classes alternate daily between odd and even days. Odd days feature blocks 1, 3, 5, and 7, and even days feature blocks 2, 3, 4, and 6. The school day for students begins at 8:00 a.m. and ends at 3:00 p.m. Opportunities for club meetings and extra help occur each day from 3:00-3:45 p.m. Students who are scheduled by a teacher to stay after school during this time are required to do so. Students not engaged in scheduled, planned student activities from 3:00 - 3:45 p.m. may remain in the building but will not be formally supervised. Students are dismissed at 12:20 p.m. on shortened Wednesdays which occur once a month.

High School Graduation Requirements To be eligible for graduation from high school in the Falls Church City Public Schools, a student must have successfully completed the requirements for graduation as specified in the Regulations of the State Board of Education, the Standards of Quality, and the Regulations Establishing Standards for Accrediting Public Schools in VA. There are two different diploma paths: the Standard Diploma and the Advanced Studies Diploma. The Standard and Advanced Studies Diplomas are available to all students. Students must meet the state diploma requirements that are in place at the time of their entry into grade nine. Half credits are awarded to students who successfully complete each semester of study in a given course. Students who achieve a passing grade in a course and a passing score on an end-of-course SOL test shall be awarded a verified unit of credit in that course. Students may earn verified credits in any courses for which end-of-course SOL tests are available. The Falls Church City School Board awards diplomas to all secondary school students who earn the units of credit prescribed by the State Board of Education, pass the required tests, and meet other requirements as prescribed by the local School Board and approved by the State Board of Education. The local School Board awards Certificates of Program Completion to students who complete required coursework but do not meet the Virginia testing requirements. Provisions are made for students who transfer between secondary schools as outlined in the Standards of Accreditation. Reasonable accommodations to meet the requirements for diplomas are provided for students with disabilities as needed. The minimum requirements for each high school diploma are summarized in the following tables:

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Academic Areas English Mathematics* Laboratory Sciences** History and Social Sciences*** Physical Education/Family Life Education/Health Foreign Language**** Fine Arts or CTE Economics and Personal Finance Elective Student Selected Test Total

Advanced Studies Diploma Revised Credits (Effective with the Class of 2015 and beyond) 4 4 4 4 2

SOL Verified Credits 2 2 2 2

3 1 1 3 26

1 9

* Courses must include at least 3 different course selections from: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, or other mathematics courses above the level of Algebra II. Those enrolled in the Integrated Algebra/Geometry sequence will only be awarded math credit for 2 of these 3 courses. The 3rd credit will count as an elective. ** Courses must include selections from at least 3 different science disciplines: earth science, biology, chemistry, or physics or completion of the sequence of science courses required for the International Baccalaureate Diploma. *** Courses shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and Virginia Government, and 2 courses in either world history or geography or both. **** Courses shall include 3 years of one foreign language or 2 years of 2 languages. Beginning with students entering 9th grade for the 1st time in 2013-2014, students must successfully complete 1 virtual course, which may be non-credit bearing.

Academic Areas English Mathematics* Laboratory Sciences** History and Social Sciences Physical Education/Family Life Education/Health Foreign Language, Fine Arts or CTE*** Economics and Personal Finance Elective Student Selected Test Total

Standard Diploma Revised Credits (Effective with the Class of 2015 and beyond) 4 3 3 3 2

SOL Verified Credits 2 1 1 1

2 1 4 22

1 6

* Students enrolled in the Integrated Algebra/Geometry sequence will only be awarded math credit for 2 of these 3 courses. The 3rd credit will count as an elective. ** Courses must include selections from at least 2 different science disciplines: earth science, biology, chemistry, or physics or completion of the sequence of science courses required for the International Baccalaureate Diploma. *** Beginning with students entering 9th grade for the 1st time in 2013-2014, students must earn a board-approved career and technical education credential or pass a workplace readiness exam. Beginning with students entering 9th grade for the 1st time in 2013-2014, students must successfully complete 1 virtual course, which may be non-credit bearing. 8

Verified Credits Each student must take all applicable end-of-course Standards of Learning (SOL) tests following course instruction. Students who achieve a passing grade in a course and a passing score on an SOL test will be awarded a verified unit of credit in that course. Students may earn verified credits in any courses for which SOL tests are available. Students must earn a specific number of verified credits to be awarded a high school diploma. A complete list of board-approved substitute tests/scores can be found on the VA DOE website. For students entering a VA public school for the first time during grades 10-12, the state has developed a verified credit provision as listed below. Advanced Studies Diploma Students transferring into a Virginia public school for the first time During 9th Grade Beginning of 10th Grade

Subjects

Number of Credits

English 2 Mathematics 2 Science 2 History and Social Science 2 Student Selected 1 During 10th Grade English 2 Beginning of 11th Grade Mathematics 1 Science 1 History and Social Science 1 Student Selected 1 During 11th Grade English 1 Beginning of 12th Grade Student Selected 3 During 12th Grade Students should be given every opportunity to earn a diploma. If this is not possible, students may arrange to have their previous school award the diploma or seek a waiver of the verified credit requirement from the DOE. *Beginning = First 20 hours of instruction *During = After the first 20 hours of instruction Standard Diploma Students transferring into a Virginia public school for the first time During 9th Grade Beginning of 10th Grade

Subjects

Number of Credits

English 2 Mathematics 1 Science 1 History and Social Science 1 Student Selected 1 During 10th Grade English 1 Beginning of 11th Grade Mathematics 1 Science* 1 History and Social Science* 1 During 11th Grade English 1 Beginning of 12th Grade Student Selected 1 During 12th Grade Students should be given every opportunity to earn a diploma. If this is not possible, students may arrange to have their previous school award the diploma or seek a waiver of the verified credit requirement from the DOE. *Students who complete a career and technical education program sequence may substitute a certificate, occupational competency credential or license for either a science or history and social science verified credit pursuant to 8 VAC 20131-50. *Beginning = First 20 hours of instruction *During = After the first 20 hours of instruction 9

Standard and Verified Credits Standard credits are earned for courses specified by the Regulations of the State Board of Education, the Regulations Establishing Standards for Accrediting Public Schools in Virginia, and Falls Church City Public Schools Policy and Regulations (6.14). Standard credit courses appear on a student’s transcript and count towards the credits required to receive a High School diploma. Verified credits are earned by students who receive a passing grade in standard credit courses and a passing score on the associated end-of-course SOL test. Verified credit requirements and tests that have been approved to substitute for endof-course SOL examinations are listed on the Virginia Department of Education website. Students should see their counselor for more information.

Standard and Verified Credits Earned in Middle School When students in middle school successfully complete the requirements for standard or verified credit-bearing courses, credit will be counted toward the subject area requirement for graduation and will be counted in the cumulative grade point average calculation. Parents may request in writing that grades for any standard or verified credit-bearing course taken in middle school be omitted from the student’s transcript. The student will not earn the standard or verified credit for that course.

Grading Information All courses are either one or two semesters in length. Students earn one-half credit (0.5) for each semester of a course completed with a grade of "D-" or better. All students are required to complete a two-hour semester exam in each class. Second semester seniors who have earned third and fourth quarter grades of "A" in a course are exempt from the final exam. The semester grade is determined by counting each quarter grade 40% and the semester exam 20%. High school transcripts include semester grades and credit earned at George Mason High School, transferred grades and credit from other schools, and college entrance exam scores. George Mason High School does not rank students. It does report final decile standing to colleges and universities.

George Mason Grading System A B C D F P I N FNA

90-100 80-89 70-79 60-69 59-Below Pass Incomplete No grade intended Failure due to non-attendance

+ 98-100 88-89 78-79 68-69 N/A

90-91 80-81 70-71 60-61 N/A

Quality Points 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0

Weighted Course Quality Points 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 0

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Grade Point Average Calculations The student’s grade point average is determined by totaling all quality points awarded and dividing the sum by the total number of credits attempted. 𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 𝑄𝑢𝑎𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑃𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑠 𝐴𝑤𝑎𝑟𝑑𝑒𝑑 = 𝐺𝑟𝑎𝑑𝑒 𝑃𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑡 𝐴𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑎𝑔𝑒 𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 𝐶𝑟𝑒𝑑𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝐴𝑡𝑡𝑒𝑚𝑝𝑡𝑒𝑑

Semester For each letter grade earned at the end of a semester, a student is awarded quality points as follows: A= 2.00 B= 1.50 C= 1.00 D = .50 F =0

Year For each letter grade earned at the end of a year, a student is awarded quality points as follows: A= 4.0 B= 3.0 C= 2.0 D = 1.0 F =0 Students taking IB, AP, or DE courses will receive one additional quality point per course per year. For those courses: A= 5.0 B= 4.0 C= 3.0 D = 2.0 F =0

Pass/Fail Option After careful consideration, students, with the permission of their parent/guardian, teacher and counselor, may elect to be graded “Pass/Fail” in a specific course. The decision for pass/fail must be made by the end of the first or third quarter of the semester. A signed form must then be turned in to the student’s counselor. A passing grade will not be counted in the student’s GPA. A failing grade will be counted in the student’s GPA. Excluding contract classes, a student should not have more than one pass/fail course per semester in grades 9 and 10 and not more than two per semester in grades 11 and 12. Students who speak English as a second or other language may be eligible to be graded pass/fail in more subjects.

Honors Courses Some George Mason classes have been identified as Honors courses. The material in these courses tends to be greater in terms of quantity and complexity than in other courses. The pace may also be faster at times. Students planning to enroll in Honors classes should be academically motivated and have a strong record of academic success. Honors courses do not carry weighted grades.

Repeat and Audited Classes Students may repeat math or language classes in certain situations. Those who have passed a math or language course may repeat the passed course for greater mastery and with administrative approval. Additionally, students who have earned a grade of “F” in a course may repeat the course. In all cases, the student will receive the higher letter grade, but no additional credit will be awarded. All courses attempted and earned grades will appear on the student’s transcript. Students may, with the permission of the teacher, audit classes in areas of interest or for skill improvement, but for which they do not wish to receive either a grade or credit. In this case, the student will receive a grade of “N” on the transcript. Students who audit and repeat courses are expected to follow all class regulations and complete all work. Note: Repeated courses may not count toward VA High School League (VHSL) eligibility. Audited courses do not count toward VA High School League eligibility.

Dual Enrollment Northern Virginia Community College and George Mason High School offer dual-enrollment for students who wish to take college courses for high school and/or college credit. Students must be at least sixteen years old and apply at least two weeks before the NOVA semester begins. Applications are available in the Counseling Office and at NOVA. Dual Enrollment courses are conducted on the NOVA campus and may also be held at George Mason High School.

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Hybrid and Virtual Learning Hybrid classes are available for any George Mason High School student. A course may be taught in a Hy-C lab (Hybrid Learning Center) or with counselor and administrative approval may be scheduled as an independent study. The courses blend online content with face-to-face instruction or assistance as needed. All courses are taught by a highly qualified George Mason teacher in the subject area. We offer a variety of classes which help students with credit recovery or adding an additional class to their schedule to meet the demands of a full schedule. Hy-C classes are currently aligned with end of course testing standards if applicable. Please see below for the list of courses offered. Any course taken for credit from another accredited institution must have prior approval, and any grade for that course given by that institution will stand as recorded by that institution. Permission to enroll with other institutions will not be granted when such course is available through the GM Hybrid program. Available courses listed below: 113005 English 9 Part1 113075 English 9 Part2 114005 English 10 Part1 114075 English 10 Part2 115005 English 11 Part1 115075 English 11 Part 2 116005 English 12 Part 1 116075 English 12 Part 2

221505 World Civilizations I Part 1 221575 World Civilizations I Part 2 221605 World Civilizations II Part 1 221675 World Civilizations II Part 2 236005 US History Part 1 236075 US History Part 2 244005 US Government Part 1 244075 US Government Part 2

612005 Economics and Personal Finance Part 1 612075 Economics and Personal Finance Part 2

730005 Physical Education 9 Part 1 730075 Physical Education 9 Part 2 740005 Physical Education 10 Part 1 740075 Physical Education 10 Part 2

421005 Earth Science Part 1 421075 Earth Science Part 2 426005 Astronomy Part 1 426075 Astronomy Part 2 431005 Biology Part 1 431075 Biology Part 2

313005 Algebra I Part 1 313075 Algebra I Part 2 313505 Algebra II Part 1 313575 Algebra II Part 2 314305 Geometry Part 1 314375 Geometry Part 2

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Dual Enrollment Dual Enrollment can provide students an opportunity to enhance their education by enrolling early in college courses. This allows students to progress toward their next academic goal without having to wait until high school graduation. Studies show that students who acquire college credits while still in high school are more likely to graduate from high school and continue their formal education. In addition, dual enrollment:  Provides students with a wider range of courses giving them an opportunity to complete general education courses required at most colleges and also allows them to explore different fields before declaring a major.  Allows students to receive high school and college credit simultaneously.  Can eliminate the duplication of courses taken in high school and in college.  Permits students to accumulate credits prior to entering college so they can be able to graduate from college early or on time.  Facilitates a seamless transition from high school to college. Students can get a taste of what college is like without being overwhelmed by a new environment. They can experience how their high school classes compare to college courses.  Engages students by enhancing student learning throughout the senior year of high school.  Can lower the cost of a post-secondary education.

An Example of a Dual Enrollment Sequence Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11

Grade 12

No dual enrollment AP Government (3 Credits) US History 121 & 122 (6 Credits) Physics 101 & 102 (8 Credits) SDV 100 (Summer) (1 Credit) AP Statistics (3 Credits) English Composition 111 & 112 (6 Credits) Theatre Appreciation I CST 141 (3 Credits) Principles of Public Speaking CST 100 (3 Credits)

Upon successful completion of the following courses, students will earn a General Education Certificate from Northern Virginia Community College.

Arts The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 promotes Arts education for every student. Arts (visual and/or performing) are required as part of a well-rounded K-12 education. The liberal arts are an essential component of a high quality educational experience.

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General Education Certificate Pathway (33 college credits)

Theater Appreciation CST 141 3 credits Theater I/II 1 high school credit

Physics: PHY 101-102 8 credits Physics I 1 high school credit US History 121-122 6 credits US History 1 high school credit

College Composition: Eng 111-112 6 credits (English 12) 1 high school credit

College Success Skills (Summer): SDV 100 1 credit

Dual Enrollment1

AP US Government: PLS 211-212 3 credits 1 high school credit

French A1 or B: no credit Spanish A1 or B: no credit

Psychology: PSY 201 Social Anthropology: SOC 211

IB Biology: BIO 101 IB Chemistry: CHM 111 IB Physics: PHY 201

IB English A1: ENG 111

IB3 Final Score of 5

French A1 or B: FRE 201-202 Spanish A1 or B: SPA 201-202

Psychology: PSY 201-202 Social Anthropology: SOC 211-212

IB Biology: BIO 101-102 IB Chemistry: CHM 111-112 IB Physics: PHY 201-202

IB English A1: ENG 111-112

IB3 Final Score of 6-7

AP Calculus AB: MTH 173 AP Calculus BC: MTH 173-174 AP Statistics: MTH 241 3 credits 1 high school credit

AP Spanish IV 3 credits 1 high school credit

AP2

The General Education Certificate completes the Freshman year of college. Credit can be earned through dual enrolled courses, or through AP/IB courses with the necessary end of course score and are eligible to earn college credit. DE courses are available to rising juniors and seniors who are qualified to take the course; exceptions can be made for exceptional sophomores who meet the qualification standards.

NOVA General Education Certificate SDV 100 College Success Skills English 111-112 College Composition I & II (3 credits each)4 MTH 151 or Higher Mathematics (3-5 credits; depends on course)2 Physical or Life Science Elective (w/ lab) I & 2 (4 Credits per course)5 Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 Electives Required (9 credits total)2, 6 Humanities/ Fine Arts Elective I & II (6 credits total)3, 7

1 Students receive college credits at the end of the course; C or better would likely transfer to a Virginia college 2 College credits earned by passing final exam; 2-year programs allow a score of 3 or higher; 4-year institutions require a 4 or 5 on AP Exams 3 College Credits earned through higher level course; Credit earned for either 1 or 2 courses depending on the final score 4 Eng 125 Survey of Literature or a Communications Course can be used as an alternative to 5 Some colleges require a two semester sequence

7 Completion of 2 years of an AP / IB language fulfills the humanities requirement

6 Many AS degrees require at least 1 history course

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Career Planning Overview As stated in the Superintendent of Public Instruction’s memo #087-13, “Beginning with the 2013-2014 academic year, all schools shall begin development of a personal Academic and Career Plan for each seventh-grade student with completion by the fall of the student’s eighth-grade year. Students who transfer from other than a Virginia public school into the eighth-grade shall have the Plan developed as soon as practicable following enrollment. Beginning with the 20142015 academic year, students who transfer into a Virginia public school after their eighth-grade year shall have an Academic and Career Plan developed upon enrollment.” Career Clusters are groupings of occupations and industries that are used for organizing curriculum design, and career counseling and guidance. The Academic and Career Plan must include:  A program of study for high school graduation and a postsecondary career pathway based on the student’s academic and career interest;  A review and update, if necessary, before the student enters the ninth and eleventh grades;  The signatures of the student, student’s parent or guardian and school official. Note: The school shall have met its obligation for parental involvement if it makes a good faith effort to notify the parent or guardian of the responsibility for the development and approval of the Plan. The academic and career plan must be included in the student record.

Following are samples of two Career Clusters with a specific Career Pathway within each Cluster. FCCPS uses Naviance as their assessment tool for the career inventory. There are a total of 16 clusters. To view all the clusters, go to either the student’s Naviance/Family Connections account at http://connection.naviance.com/gmhs or visit the VDOE website at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/career_technical/career_clusters/.

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Career Pathway: Engineering World History/ Geography II

S.S.

Biology I

US/VA Gov

Science

Algebra I

Chemistry

Math

English 9

Geometry

English

9

English 10

Social Science Elective

Optional Foreign Language

Foreign Language

Foreign Language

Elective

Optional Elective

Architectural Drawing

Engineering Drawing

Required Courses/Recommended Elec. Health & Foreign Basic Technical PE Language Drawing

10

Key

General College Physics I

Elective

Health & PE

11

12

Year 1 1st Semester

Year 1 Construction Computer Aided Processes of 2nd Semester Methodology & Drafting & Industry Procedures I Design I Year 2 Structural Engineering Statics & 1st Semester Systems Graphics Strength of Materials Year 2 Architectural Technical Computer 2nd Semester Drafting II Drawing Aided Drafting & Design II University/College: Virginia Tech (articulation agreement with NOVA) Degree or Major: Engineering Number of Articulated CC Credits: 67-68

History of Western Civilization I Automated Manufacture Technology

English 11 Algebra II Earth Science US/VA History or Economics or US History Dual & Personal Geophysics Enrollment Finance Dual Enrollment English 12 or Advanced Physics Optional Elective Optional English Dual Algebra and Elective Enrollment Trigonometry Postsecondary Placement Assessments (Reading, Writing, & Math) Architectural Surveying I College Basic Prog. Lifetime Drafting I Composition I Applied to Fitness & Electrical/ Wellness Electronic Calcs. or Intro to Computing Pre-calculus w/ Trigonometry

Grade

SAMPLE 1 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Career Cluster

S E C O N D A R Y

POSTS E C O N D A R Y Community College Career Placement 4-year Institution

Required Course 2 Dual Credit or Articulated course (HS to CC) 3 Articulated course: CC to 4-yr

Related Career Samples

Aeronautical Engineer, Aerospace Engineer, Agricultural Engineer, Agricultural Technician, Application Engineer, Architectural Engineer, Automotive Engineer, Biomedical Engineer, Biotechnology Engineer CAD Technician, Chemical Engineer Civil Engineer, Communications Engineer, Computer Engineer, Computer Programmer, Construction Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Electronics Technician, Geothermal Engineer, Industrial Engineer, Manufacturing Engineer, Manufacturing Technician, Marine Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Metallurgist, Mining Engineer, Nuclear Engineer, Petroleum Engineer, Product/Process Engineer, Survey Technician, Systems Engineer, Transportation Engineer

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4-year Institution

POST S E C O N D A R Y Community College or Apprenticeship

S E C O N D A R Y Algebra II/Trig

Geometry

Math

Chemistry

Biology I

Science World History/ Geography II

S.S. Health & PE

College Composition

Technical Math I

Computer Aided Drafting & Design I Structures for Architects History of Modern Architecture

History of Architecture

Number of Articulated CC Credits: 67-68

Lifetime Fitness & Wellness Key

Construction Methodology & Procedures II Environmental Systems

Architectural Graphics I

Computer Aided Drafting & Design II Construction Estimating

Seminar and Project

College Success Skills

Optional Elective (example: Carpentry I)

Architectural Drawing

Engineering Drawing

Basic Technical Drawing

Architectural Design & Graphics II Required Course 2 Dual Credit or Articulated course (HS to CC) 3 Articulated course: CC to 4-yr

Site Planning

Construction Methodology & Procedures I Architectural Graphics II

Optional Foreign Language or Elective

Foreign Language

Foreign Language

Foreign Language

Required Courses/Recommended Elec.

US/VA Health & PE Government or AP Government English 11 IB Math IB Physics HL US/VA Economics & SL I I History or Personal US History Finance Dual Enrollment English 12 or IB Math IB Physics HL Elective to Other English Dual SL II/ AP II Complement Electives to Enrollment Calculus Pathway Complement AB (Core Pathway (Core Academic Academic & and CTE) CTE Postsecondary Placement Assessments (Reading, Writing, & Math)

English 10

English 9

English

Year 2 Architectural Social 1st Design & Science Semester Graphics I Elective Year 2 Intro to Outdoor Survey of 2nd Communication Adventures Western Semester Culture University/College: Virginia Tech (articulation agreement with NOVA) Degree or Major: Engineering

Year 1 2nd Semester

Year 1 1st Semester

12

11

10

9

Grade

Career Pathway: Design/Pre-Construction

SAMPLE 2 Architecture & Construction Career Cluster

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Architect, Architectural, Drafter, Building Code Inspector, Building Code Official, Building Designer, Civil Engineer, Code Official, Cost Estimator, Drafter, Electrical Engineer, Electrical Engineering Technician, Electronic Engineer, Electronic Engineering Technician, Environmental Designer Environmental Engineer, Environmental Engineering Technician, Fire Prevention/Protection Engineer, Industrial Engineer, Interior Designer, Landscape Architect, Materials Engineer, Mechanical Drafter, Mechanical Engineer, Regional and Urban Planner/Designer, Safety Director, Specification Writer, Structural Engineer, Surveying/ Mapping Technician, Surveyor

Related Career Samples

Verification of Transfer Credit and Grades Students transferring into George Mason High School (GMHS) from accredited schools will receive the credit and the letter grades they achieved in the school(s) from which they transfer. These letter grades will be translated into the GMHS quality point system, and GPA will be calculated. Only International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP), and Dual Enrollment (DE) courses will receive a weighted grade. The transcript from the transferring school will become part of the student’s permanent record at GMHS. Students who have not attended an accredited school are required to submit course outlines, testing results, teacher summaries, portfolios of work, and/or other supporting materials documenting clock hours and proficiency. Grades awarded will be “Pass” (P) or “Fail” (F). Students who transfer after beginning their senior year may be eligible for a waiver of the Virginia verified credit requirement if there is an extreme hardship. Portfolios, proficiency tests, and other measures will be used to evaluate student records. When receiving foreign transcripts and grades, the department curriculum leader may help evaluate the transferring student’s sequential course status. In cases where equivalent grades cannot be determined, credit will be awarded on a pass/fail basis. The transcript from the previous school may be included with GMHS college application materials.

Grade Placement Grade placement and promotion requirements are determined by School Board Policy and Regulation Number 6.44. The minimum requirements for placement in a given grade are as follows: To be placed in grade:

The student must have:

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Successfully completed 8th grade

10

Earned 5 credits

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Earned 10 credits, including a minimum of 5 core credits

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Earned 15 credits, including 7.5 core credits and 3 verified credits. In addition, a student must have an academic program in place which allows for the completion of all graduation requirements by the last day of school.

Minimum Schedule Requirements School Board Policy 9.22 states, “Secondary students shall be scheduled for a full school day unless they are participating in a school-approved internship or work experience.” However, students may take a supervised study class as one of their seven periods.  

Students in Grades 9 and 10 are required to take six classes, but they are advised to take seven. If they take six, their seventh class will be a supervised study block. Students in Grades 11 and 12 are required to take five classes. Twelfth graders who take fewer than seven classes and are in good standing behaviorally and academically may have one unsupervised senior study. Seniors with two unfilled classes will normally be scheduled into one supervised study block and one open study block. Open study privileges are subject to administrative approval. If seniors break school rules and incur sanctions, their open study privileges may be revoked.

Any student who wishes to take a reduced schedule or be dismissed at the completion of five class blocks must have the permission of the principal. Parents must submit a written formal request to the principal stating the reasons for the waiver.

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Schedule Change Procedures Students may add a course for credit during the first 10 school days of a semester without penalty. Students desiring schedule changes must discuss the change with the classroom teacher, parent, counselor, and, when appropriate, IB Coordinator, Case Manager, and Athletic Director. A signed form must then be turned in to the student’s counselor. Students may drop to a lower level course within the first 6 weeks of the school year. Please make sure to complete the required form.

Summer Academy George Mason High School offers some summer school options. In some cases these courses may be required of identified students. Please contact the Counseling Office for more information. If students are planning on attending summer school outside of GMHS, they must notify their counselor.

Early Graduation It is recommended that students attend high school for the entire four years; however, it is recognized that there are exceptional cases where it might be in the student’s best interest to complete high school in less than four years. Therefore, if a student and his/her parent/guardian are interested in early graduation, they should contact the student’s counselor. The principal, with recommendations from the counseling office, will make the final decision. Students who apply for early graduation must meet the following criteria:     

15 credits by the beginning of the eleventh grade year A quality grade point average of 1.5 or better A viable post-graduation plan A written request A student who requests permission to take two English courses in one year must have a grade point average of 2.0 or better in previous English classes.

Other factors considered include the age and maturity of the student, extraordinary family circumstances, and the need for training not available through the school.

Long Term Medical Excuses from Physical Education To meet Virginia high school graduation requirements students must earn one credit in 9th grade physical education and one credit in 10th grade physical education. If a student is unable to participate in the traditional physical education class for the school year due to a long term medical condition, the student must provide a written statement from a physician. The statement should include the reasons for non-participation and should specify whether the student can participate on a limited basis or may not participate in any physical education activities for that school year. Students excused from the traditional physical education class are not exempted from the graduation requirements. Students excused from physical education can complete Virginia high school graduation requirements via an online program.

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ACADEMIC/ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY Our extra-curricular activities are a vital part of our school program. Activities provide students opportunities to explore personal talents and interests, as well as make the high school experience more enjoyable. Athletic, academic and theatre teams operate under the Virginia High School League (VHSL) regulations.

VHSL Eligibility Regulations:      

You must complete a VHSL eligibility form each year. You must be a student in good standing at George Mason High School. You must be currently taking 5 or more classes for credit. (Courses for which credit has previously been granted do not count.) You must have passed 5 subjects for credit the previous semester. (Courses for which credit has previously been granted do not count.) You must not have reached your 19th birthday on or before the 1st day of August of the year of participation. You must not have been enrolled in grades 9-12 for more than 8 semesters.

Note: Freshmen are automatically eligible during their first semester of high school. All other students need to verify their eligibility status with their counselor and coaches at the end of each semester.

Hy-C courses and VHSL eligibility In order for a Hy-C class to count toward the VHSL requirement that a student be currently taking 5 classes for credit, the Hy-C class must be started concurrently with that semester (cannot be started in previous semester), or added concurrent with the dropping of a different class. In order for a Hy-C class to count toward the VHSL requirement that a student pass 5 subjects for credit the previous semester, the Hy-C class must have been started AND completed within the calendar time-frame of the previous semester. Hy-C classes that extend beyond one semester, or are started in the summer but completed in the fall semester do not count toward VHSL eligibility requirements. Please contact the Athletic Department with any questions.

Post-Secondary Athletic Eligibility: To participate at an NCAA Division I institution, students will need to meet the following requirements to receive athletics aid, practice and compete their first year:  16 core courses:  Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before your seventh semester.  Once you begin your seventh semester, you may not repeat or replace any of those 10 courses to improve your core-course GPA.  Minimum GPA of 2.300 in those 16 core courses  Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale, which balances your test score and core-course GPA. If you have a low test score, you need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. If you have a low core-course GPA, you need a higher test score to be eligible.  Example: 2.500 core-course GPA requires 820 SAT or 68 ACT sum score.  Graduate from high school. More information on NCAA Eligibility (including information about Division II and III) may be obtained from the NCAA Eligibility Center website at www.eligibilitycenter.org.

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Recognition of Student Achievement Recognition from the Commonwealth of Virginia Governor’s Seal Upon graduation, this seal is awarded to students who:  Complete the requirements of the Advanced Studies diploma with an average grade of “B” or better AND  Successfully complete college-level coursework that will earn the student at least 9 transferable college credits in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge or Dual Enrollment courses. The Board of Education Seal Upon graduation, this seal is awarded to students who:  Complete the requirements for a Standard Diploma or Advanced Diploma with an average grade of “A.” Board of Education’s Advanced Mathematics and Technology Seal Upon graduation, this seal is awarded to students who:  Earn a Standard or an Advanced Studies diploma AND  Satisfy all the mathematics requirements for the Advanced Studies Diploma (four units of credit including Algebra II; earn 2 verified units of credit) with at least a “B” average AND one of the following: o pass an examination in a career and technical education field that confers certification from a recognized industry, trade, or professional association OR o acquire a professional license in a career or technical field from the Commonwealth of Virginia OR o pass an examination approved by the Board that confers college-level credit in a technology or computer science area. Lists of trade, industry, and professional licenses and certifications that satisfy the requirements of the Career and Technical Education Seal and the Seal of Advanced Mathematics and Technology are available on the Internet at www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/graduation/diploma_seals/industry_certs_career-tech.pdf Board of Education’s Biliteracy Seal Certifies attainment of a high level of proficiency by a graduating high school student in one or more languages in addition to English, and certifies that the graduate meets all of the following criteria:  The Board of Education’s Seal of Biliteracy will be awarded to students who earn a Board of Education-approved diploma and (i) pass all required End-of-Course Assessments in English reading and writing at the proficient or higher level; and (ii) be proficient at the intermediate-mid level or higher in one or more languages other than English, as demonstrated through an assessment from a list to be approved by the Superintendent of Public Instruction.  For purposes of this article, “foreign language” means a language other than English and includes American Sign Language. The Board of Education’s Career and Technical Education Seal Upon graduation, this seal is awarded to students who:  Earn a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma and complete a prescribed sequence of courses in a career and technical education concentration or specialization that they choose and maintain a “B” or better average in those courses  OR pass an examination or an occupational competency assessment in a career and technical education concentration or specialization that confers certification or occupational competency credential from a recognized industry, trade or professional association  OR acquire a professional license in that career and technical education field from the Commonwealth of VA The Board of Education shall approve all professional licenses and examinations used to satisfy these requirements.

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Board of Education’s Excellence in Civics Education Seal Upon graduation, this seal is awarded to students who meet each of the following 4 criteria:  Satisfy the requirement to earn a Standard Diploma or an Advanced Studies Diploma  Complete VA and U.S. History and VA and U.S. Government courses with a grade of “B” or higher  Complete 50 hours of voluntary participation in community service or extracurricular activities, such as volunteering for a charitable or religious organization that provides services to the poor, sick or less fortunate; participating in Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts or similar youth organizations; participating in Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); participating in political campaigns, government internships, Boys State, Girls State or Model General Assembly; and participating in school-sponsored extracurricular activities that have a civics focus. Any student who enlists in the U.S. military prior to graduation will be deemed to have met this community service requirement.  Have good attendance and no disciplinary infractions as determined by local school board policies.

Recognition within the Falls Church City Public Schools Honor Roll Each quarter the Honor Roll is determined and student names are posted. In order to be listed on the Honor Roll, students must take at least five courses for credit that are graded “A-F”, earn a GPA of 3.25 or better, and receive no grade lower than a “C-”. The Principal’s List of Outstanding Scholars Each quarter the Principal's List of Outstanding Scholars is determined and student names are posted. In order to qualify for the Principal's List of Outstanding Scholars, a student must take at least five courses for credit that are graded “A-F”, earn a GPA of 4.0 or better for the quarter, and receive no grade lower than a “B-”. The Gunston Scholars The Gunston Scholar designation is awarded to students earning all “A's” for their semester courses. In order to qualify for this recognition, a student must take at least five courses for credit that are graded “A-F,” and earn all “A's” for semester grades. The George Mason Scholar Award The George Mason Scholar Award recognizes outstanding academic achievement of graduating seniors. This award is presented to students who complete a high school program which includes a minimum of 25 credits: a cumulative GPA of 3.85 or better; and the following courses taken for letter (A-F) grades: four years of Individuals and Societies, four years of college preparatory mathematics, three years of one foreign language or two years each of different foreign languages, three years of laboratory science, and IB courses in two disciplines. Those students who successfully complete the program described above are recognized at the graduation ceremony. Valedictory Scholars Valedictory Scholars are those students who complete high school with a cumulative GPA of 4.0 or better. They are recognized at the graduation ceremony. Mind, Body, and Character Awards Teachers, counselors, and administrators recognize students throughout the year for demonstrating excellence in mind, body, or character. These students are recognized at assemblies at the end of the first, second and third quarters.

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SPECIAL PROGRAMS Arlington Career Center Program The Falls Church City Public Schools support a limited number of students in a career preparation program of studies in the Arlington County Public Schools. The Arlington Career Center (ACC) is designed to serve as an extension of the program at GMHS. The ACC provides educational experiences and vocational programs for 10, 11 and 12 grade students. The ACC’s purpose is to provide educational experiences in the areas of occupational exploration, career preparation, and enrichment to those students seeking a “hands-on” learning style. The ACC faculty assists students in job placement upon successful completion of their program. In many instances the completion of an ACC course provides students with the opportunity for advancement in post high school programs, especially those of Northern Virginia Community College. Interested students please see the ACC course listings at the end of this Program of Studies for more information.

English Learners Program (EL) The English Learners (EL) Program courses are designed for the non-native speaker of English with limited English proficiency. Screening tests determine student placement in the program. Exit testing, teacher recommendation, and administrative approval are required before a student exits to mainstream classes. High school credits toward graduation are provided upon successful completion of each EL class for ninth through twelfth grades.

Pathway to the Baccalaureate Pathway to the Baccalaureate is a college access program that provides guidance and support through the college process beginning in the senior year as students pursue a college degree. Students work with a NOVA (Northern Virginia Community College) college counselor housed at GMHS to develop a plan for seamless transition to college. The focus is on students who are considering starting their college career at the community college before transferring to a 4-year college or university. Students participate in monthly workshops that focus on important college transition issues including college placement testing and financial planning. In addition, students receive early placement testing, academic advising and priority registration for their first semester of college courses. Students are eligible to apply at the beginning of the senior year.

Special Education Special Education services will be provided for all students found eligible to receive such services. High School Special Education services follow the multi-categorical resource model. Students study in specific content areas or receive credit for basic study skills and tutorial support for general education courses. Please contact the Director of Special Education and Student Services, at the Central Office (703-248-5635) for information concerning Special Education services.

Tuition Students George Mason High School accepts students from outside the school district boundaries on a tuition basis. Tuition rates and service fees are set by the School Board. The application procedures may be obtained online: www.fccps.org. A complete tuition application packet consists of transcripts, immunization and health records, original birth certificate, test scores, and related school records. The prospective student and parent/guardian will meet with the Director of Counseling for an initial interview. Afterward, the student and parent/guardian will meet with the Principal who will determine if the student will be recommended to the Superintendent and School Board for acceptance.

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Program of Study Course Sequence Traditionally, the majority of George Mason High School graduates successfully matriculate to four-year or two-year post-secondary institutions throughout the United States and abroad. Most students at George Mason follow a program of study that prepares them for college. Such courses are found in our two major programs of study: College Preparatory and International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme. Many colleges and universities expect students to take the most rigorous courses available in which they can be successful. At George Mason, the most rigorous courses are the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme classes, Advanced Placement (AP), and Dual Enrollment (DE) classes. College-bound students should seek to meet these typical college preparatory guidelines: 4 credits of English, 4 credits of mathematics (to include Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II), 3-4 credits of social studies, 3-4 credits of laboratory science (which may include Biology, Chemistry, and Physics), 2-4 credits of foreign/world language, and 2-4 credits of elective study. It should be remembered, however, that individual college requirements vary, so students should always check with prospective colleges about minimum entrance requirements. Students are always advised to consult their counselors when considering colleges and universities. The following shows an example of a general college preparatory program of study. Students work with their counselor to develop an individualized four-year plan of study to meet their specific needs and goals.

An Example of a General College Preparatory Sequence Grade 9 English 9 World Civilizations/Geography II Algebra I or Geometry Biology or Earth Science Spanish, French or Mandarin Chinese Physical Education and Health 9 Elective Grade 10 English 10 US/VA Government Geometry or Algebra II Biology, Chemistry, or Earth Science Spanish, French or Mandarin Chinese Physical Education and Health 10/ Driver Ed. Elective Grade 11 English 11 US/VA History Algebra II, IB Mathematical Studies SL, AP Statistics, or IB Mathematics SL I Physics, Chemistry, or Earth and Space Systems Spanish, French or Mandarin Chinese Economics & Personal Finance Elective Grade 12 English 12 Social Studies Elective Algebra II, IB Mathematical Studies SL, AP Statistics, or IB Mathematics SL II/AP Calculus AB Science Elective Spanish, French or Mandarin Chinese Elective 24

Middle Years Programme (MYP) Diploma Programme (DP)

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE

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George Mason Learners Excel in Mind, Body, and Character We believe that the George Mason Learner Profile is a set of ideals that can inspire, motivate and give focus to the work of schools, teachers, parents and students, uniting all of us in a common purpose.

We Strive to Be: Inquirers

We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

Knowledgeable

We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

Thinkers

We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyze and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned ethical decisions.

Communicators

We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

Principled

We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

Open-minded

We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring

We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

Risk-takers

We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovate strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change.

Balanced

We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives - intellectual, physical and emotional - to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live.

Reflective

We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

The Learner Profile is taken from: International Baccalaureate. (2013). IB Learner Profile. Cardiff, Wales.

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Middle Years Programme (MYP) Falls Church City Public Schools has adopted the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP) for grades 6-10 at Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School and George Mason High School. Teachers have been preparing to offer this programme to all students in grades 6-10 through professional development and curriculum writing since 2012. With the addition of the IB MYP, FCCPS students will be able to participate in IB programmes at all grade levels (K-12). FCCPS will be the first school division in Virginia to offer International Baccalaureate programmes to all students in grades K-12. The IB MYP is designed for students ages 11-16. It provides a framework of learning that encourages students to become creative, critical, and reflective thinkers. It builds upon the knowledge, skills, and attitudes developed in the IB Primary Years Programme (grades K-5) and will prepare students to meet the academic challenges of the IB Diploma Programme in grades 11 and 12. In grades 9 and 10, or years 4 and 5 of the IB MYP, teachers employ the philosophy of the IB MYP, which is studentcentered real-world based learning. The Virginia Standards of Learning remain the core content, and teachers include transferable concepts, such as change or communication, and a variety of 21st Century college and career readiness skills, such as goal setting, long term planning, collaboration, and researching. Students are also expected to participate in service learning opportunities as they become available through their coursework. While students are mandated to take certain courses, student choice is also built into their schedules Required IB MYP Subject Groups in Years 4 & 5     

Individuals and Societies: Social Studies/History Language Acquisition: French, Mandarin, or Spanish Language and Literature: English Mathematics Science

Elective IB MYP Subject Groups in Years 4 & 5   

Arts: Visual or Performing Design: CTE Courses Physical and Health Education

Additionally, students in grade 9 will begin working on the IB MYP Personal Project, a culminating project that allows students to work independently on something they are passionate about. Students will receive in-school support through classroom lessons, supervising, and periodic check-ins. The Personal Project will be completed and showcased during the 3rd quarter of grade 10.

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“The best thing about the IB [Diploma] programme was that it turned me into a learner and it challenged me in ways I couldn’t even recognize at the time. It made me a strong writer and an analytical thinker, which have been unbelievably helpful skills in college. I also really enjoyed being part of the IB class environment where we were sympathetic...while still challenging each other to work really hard. IB made me effective at time management as well, and it make me well-rounded by challenging me in such a wide variety of subjects.” Mary Ryan, George Mason High School, Class of 2004; University of Virginia, Class of 2008 Since 1981, the most challenging college preparation offered to the students of George Mason High School is the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme. This program of advanced internationally recognized syllabi and external examinations offers a comprehensive and world-class education during the last two years of high school. The IB Diploma Programme is designed as an academically challenging and balanced program of education with final examinations that prepares students for success at university and life beyond. The program has gained recognition and respect from the world’s universities. Currently, 87% of seniors take one or more IB courses and exams; thus, our IB Diploma Programme serves a large majority of students at Mason. The program:  provides a package of education that balances subject breadth and depth, and considers the nature of knowledge across disciplines through the unique theory of knowledge course  encourages international-mindedness in IB students, starting with a foundation in their own language and culture  develops a positive attitude to learning that prepares students for university education  has a reputation for its rigorous external assessment with published global standards, making this qualification welcomed by universities worldwide  emphasized the development of the whole student- physically, intellectually, emotionally and ethically

Curriculum Mason IB DP Students may complete individual IB DP Courses and receive external results by simply taking an IB DP course and exam. They may also pursue the full IB Diploma. The IB Diploma requires students to study in six core areas: English, a world language, social science, science, mathematics, and the arts or an elective. For the IB Diploma, a candidate must successfully complete the following: earn a minimum of 24 points on six examinations graded on a scale of 1–7; complete a 4000-word extended essay in one of the content areas; complete the Theory of Knowledge (ToK) course; and reflect upon extracurricular activities in three areas: Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS). IB DP Course(s) students may also choose to complete the ToK course, participate in CAS and/or complete an Extended Essay. In May 2016, George Mason seniors posted an 84% success rate in completing the IB Diploma and achieved Diploma Scores above the international average. In addition, 87% of George Mason graduates passed an IB or AP exam. Students not wishing to fulfill all of the requirements of the IB Diploma are strongly encouraged to take individual courses in the IB curriculum to help them prepare for future education. These students thus earn IB certificates. In the 2015-2016 school year, 87% of the school’s seniors enrolled in one or more IB courses. Over 91% of current juniors are enrolled in one or more IB courses. The IB DP is guided by a clear mission translated into a set of learning outcomes for the 21st century. This clarity of the mission as learning outcomes provides a consistent thematic approach that influences all of our educational practice at George Mason High School. 28

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme courses: IB DP Language A: Literature High Level (HL) Group 1 Studies in Language and Literature IB DP Language A: Language and Literature Standard Level (SL)

IB DP Literature Self Taught SL (for a student with an advanced native fluency in a language other than English, generally we only offer this program to transfer students)

Group 2 Second Languages

IB DP Language B (for students who studied a language for five to six years) – Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese and/or English B (for advanced EL students) HL or SL IB DP ab initio (for students after two or three years of study) – this examination is only offered to students who did not have an opportunity to study a second language for five to six years at George Mason High School

Group 3 Individual and Societies (Individuals in Society)

IB DP History HL or SL (History HL I meets the Virginia US History graduation requirement) IB DP Psychology HL or SL IB DP Social and Cultural Anthropology SL IB DP Business and Management SL IB DP Economics SL (this course meets the Virginia Personal Finance and Economics Graduation requirement) IB DP Environmental Systems SL (this is an interdisciplinary science course)

Group 4 Experimental Sciences

IB DP Biology HL IB DP Chemistry HL or SL IB DP Environmental Systems SL IB DP Physics HL or SL IB DP Computer Science HL or SL (this counts as a science class for the IB Diploma and not Virginia graduation requirements, students generally complete this course as an IB elective)

Group 5 Mathematics

IB DP Mathematics HL/AP BC Calculus (an advanced study of mathematics including advanced calculus) IB DP Mathematics SL/ AP Calculus AB with IB SL Option IB DP Math Studies SL

Group 6 Arts and Electives

IB Core (these may be pursued as individual certificate options as well)

IB DP Visual Arts HL or SL IB DP Theatre Arts HL or SL IB DP Music HL or SL IB DP Film HL or SL Or a second course from groups 2, 3 or 4 IB DP Theory of Knowledge IB DP Creativity, Activity and Service (an extra-curricular recognition and reflection program – non-credit) IB DP Extended Essay (an individual research and academic writing opportunity – non-credit)

A suggested general sequence of courses for students who seek to earn an IB Diploma is listed on the following page for your reference. Each student’s IB Diploma sequence is planned to meet the individual student’s needs, strengths and interests. (Higher level IB courses are labeled “HL” and standard level IB courses are labeled “SL”) Students who complete advanced placement, college-level, or courses required for an IB Diploma shall be deemed to have completed the requirements for graduation under these standards provided that they have earned the verified credits as required of students earning either a standard or an advanced studies diploma. (Standards for Accrediting Public Schools in Virginia, July 28, 2000) 29

International Baccalaureate Diploma Recommended Sequence of Courses Leading to the IB Diploma or IB Certificates The following courses are recommended, not required, in preparation for the IB Diploma or IB Certificates for the class of 2016 and beyond at George Mason High School. Each IB Diploma candidate will meet with the IB DP Coordinator to design an individual course plan, and frequently there are slight alterations to the recommended sequence. IB DP Groups Group 1 English Literature

Grade 9 Honors English 9 or English 9

Grade 10 Honors English 10 or English 10

Grade 11 IB English: Literature 11 HL or IB English: Language and Literature 11 SL

Group 2 Second Languages

Spanish II, Spanish III, Spanish for Fluent Speakers, French II, French III or Mandarin Chinese II

Spanish III, Spanish IV, A.P. Spanish, Spanish for Fluent Speakers, French III, French IV or Mandarin Chinese III

IB Spanish B IV or V SL I/HL I, or IB French B IV or V SL I/HL I, or IB Mandarin B IV SL I/HL I

Group 3 Individuals and Societies

World Civilizations & Geography II

AP U.S. Government1

One of the following: IB History of the Americas HL2, IB Psychology HL I/SL, IB Business & Management SL, IB Social & Cultural Anthropology SL or IB Economics SL3 IB Biology HL I, IB Chemistry SL or HL I, IB Physics SL or HL I, Physics, IB Environmental Systems SL I, Earth Science, or IB Computer Science SL/HL I4

CP U.S. Government (students who do not plan to take HL History) Honors Chemistry, Chemistry and/or Physics

Group 4 Experimental Sciences

Honors Biology or Biology I

Group 5 Mathematics

Algebra I, Geometry, or Honors Geometry

Geometry, Algebra II, or Honors Algebra II/Trig

PE and TOK

PE 9

PE 10

Group 6 Arts and Electives

Elective

Elective

Algebra II ,5 Honors Algebra II/Trig, AP Calculus BC/IB Mathematics HL I, IB Mathematics SL I, IB Mathematical Studies SL, or IB Mathematics SL/AP Calculus AB IB Theory of Knowledge (Semester 2) Elective/IB Elective: IB Music SL/HL I, IB Theatre SL/HL I, IB Visual Arts SL/HL I, IB Film Studies SL/HL I, *Diploma candidates may take a second Group 2, 3 or 4 Course as their Group 6 elective.

Grade 12 IB English: Literature 12 HL or IB English: Language and Literature 12 SL IB Spanish B SL II/ or HL II, or IB French B SL or HL II, or IB Mandarin B SL or HL II IB ab initio (option for transfer students that could not study five years of language at George Mason) IB World History HL/SL, IB Psychology HL II/SL, IB Business & Management SL, IB Social & Cultural Anthropology SL or IB Economics SL IB Biology HL II, IB Chemistry SL or HL II, IB Physics SL or HL II, Physics, IB Environmental Systems SL II, Earth Science, or IB Computer Science SL/HL II4 IB Mathematics HL II, IB Mathematical Studies SL , IB Mathematics SL II/AP Calculus AB

IB Theory of Knowledge (Semester 1) Elective/IB Elective: IB Music SL/HL II, IB Theatre SL/HL II, IB Visual Arts SL/HL II, IB Film Studies SL/HL II, *Diploma candidates may take a second Group 2, 3 or 4 Course as their Group 6 elective.

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Meets state U.S Government requirements Meets state U.S. History requirements 3 Meets state Economics and Personal Finance requirement 4 IB Computer Science counts as a Group 4 course for the IB Diploma; however it does not count as a Science credit for Virginia graduation 5 Some IB courses have prerequisites. Consult the course description 2

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English/ Language Arts (GROUP 1) Honors English 9

Honors English 10

IB Eng Lit HL 1

IB Eng Lit HL 2

Grade

9

10

11

12

Education Level

High School

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IB French V/HL 2

IB French IV/HL 1

French 3

Foreign Language (GROUP 2) French 2

Mathematics

Physics

Honors Chemistry

IB Math SL 2

IB Math SL 1

Algebra II

(GROUP 4) (GROUP 5) Honors Biology Geometry

Science

IB Anthropology SL IB Physics SL

CP US History

AP US Gov’t

Social Studies/ Sciences (GROUP 3) World Civ 2

SAMPLE Course of Study for IB Diploma (3 HL/3 SL)

IB Visual Arts HL 2

IB Visual Arts HL 1

Art II

Arts or Elective (GROUP 6) Art I

TOK (Fall Semester)

TOK (Spring Semester)

HPE 10

Health/PE and Theory of Knowledge (TOK) HPE 9

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Overview Arts Design (Career and Technical Education) English Learners (EL) Individuals and Societies (Social Studies) Interdisciplinary Electives Language and Literature (English) Language Acquisition (World Languages Mathematics Physical and Health Education

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Sciences Special Education General Elective Courses Arlington Career Center (ACC)

Overview 2017 – 2018 Course Descriptions The following are descriptions of courses that may be offered at George Mason in the 2017 - 2018 school year. The teaching of a particular course can depend on the number of students who select that course and the availability of staff. It is not anticipated that every course described in this book will be taught. In some instances it may be necessary to combine classes so that desired courses can be offered. Students are encouraged to discuss course selections with their current teacher. Only Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment, and International Baccalaureate courses will receive a weighted grade. Please refer to these pages for information on registration deadlines and graduation requirements.

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Arts (Visual and Performing Arts) The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 promotes Arts education for every student. Arts (visual and/or performing) are required as part of a well-rounded K-12 education. The liberal arts are an essential component of a high quality educational experience.

Art 912007 ART I 913007 ART II Grades 9-12 Elective Prerequisite: Art I The art program is loosely structured between beginning and advanced students. The beginning classes heavily emphasize the basic skills necessary to visualize and build works of art with confidence and sophistication. Students draw, paint, sculpt, carve, print and invent in as many materials and projects as students can thoroughly complete in a given semester. Students are invited to share in this experience – all students have the potential to express themselves creatively and should acquire the skills necessary to communicate visually, whatever their goals in life. 914007 ART III 914507 ART IV Grades 11-12 Elective Recommended: Successful completion of the previous level Art course The advanced classes are geared towards more sophisticated and comprehensive projects than our introductory selections. A more in-depth study of technique, art history and personal development is expected. A goal is to produce a competitive and presentable portfolio suitable for job and college applications. Whatever the students’ long-term plans, teachers encourage work that reflects the best that each student can do at this stage in their lives. 914955 IB VISUAL ARTS SL Grades 11-12 One year program Elective 914956 IB VISUAL ARTS HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Elective Prerequisite: In-depth portfolio review and/or completion of Art I. Portfolio review and candidate interview to be held during spring registration. This is a one-year course that entails both studio artwork and art research. There are 3 components to the class: exhibition art works, a comparative study of 3 artists similar to an art history paper, and finally a process portfolio that documents research of aesthetic styles, art history, and the students creative process. The new IB curriculum entails a significant portion of written analysis, research and process journaling, as well as art making explorations. Students are expected to commit to the rigor and standards of the course. The Standard

Level course culminates in the IB Exam in early April. Students also exhibit their work in the annual IB Art Show. 914996 IB VISUAL ARTS HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Elective Prerequisite: IB Visual Arts HL I This is a two-year course for the serious art student who is committed to producing high level art works while exploring a variety of art making approaches to develop a comprehensive portfolio. High standards of inquiry and personal development are expected, as well as significant commitment to the rigor of the class. The new IB curriculum entails a significant portion of written analysis, research and process journaling. There are 3 components to the class: exhibition art works, a comparative study of 3 artists similar to an art history paper, and finally a process portfolio that documents research of aesthetic styles, art history, and the students creative process. The Higher Level course culminates in the IB Exam in early April of senior year.

Computer Graphics 918087 COMPUTER GRAPHICS I Grades 9-12 Elective Computer Graphics I is an art class in which students will explore and produce original art works of personal expression using a variety of hardware and software computer applications. Art skills are developed through creative thinking, visual problem solving and experimentation on the computer. Students will develop expertise in the use of computers, drawing tablets, scanners, and digital cameras for artmaking. Students will use the Adobe Creative Cloud in the areas of graphic design, digital imaging, and motion graphics/animation. The history of computer graphics, art aesthetics and criticism are investigated and the ethical issues concerning computer generated imagery is addressed. 918187 COMPUTER GRAPHICS II Grades 10-12 Elective Prerequisite: Computer Graphics I Computer Graphics II is an advanced art class which allows students to explore specific techniques and produce a wide variety of professional art works that could be used in the real world. Students will use their knowledge of the elements and principles of design and their technical skills to make meaningful and complex multimedia art. Art skills are further 35

developed through creative thinking, visual problem solving and experimentation using various hardware and software applications. Students will study the idea of conceptual art and design to add meaning to their artwork. Students are expected to make intelligent and personal works of art to serve as strong portfolio pieces.

Film 144687 FILM STUDIES I Grades 9-12 Elective This course will help students develop an appreciation of film as both a narrative art form and as entertainment. Students will learn to critically view, analyze, and discuss movies from different genres using the vocabulary of film makers. Students will also learn the art of film production through the creation of their own short digital movie projects. Students will gain skills in directing, cinematography and camera use, lighting techniques, recording and mixing sound, editing, and the art of “four-wall” producing as students produce their own film festival. 144787 FILM STUDIES II Grades 10-12 Elective Prerequisite: Film Studies I or an equivalent independent experience This second film studies course is an opportunity for students who have fallen in love with filmmaking and want to build a genuine portfolio of finished work with an ensemble of likeminded students. This will involve writing screenplays, taking on the roles of director, cinematographer or producer. Students will assemble crews, cast, acquire locations, and create a shooting schedule. From there, the company will enter into production where, through practice, the students will develop and refine directing, designing, lighting, sound, and camera skills. Once the movie is “in the can,” the company will enter post-production where the movie will be cut together, a soundtrack will be built, and a finished movie will take shape. Final movies will be screened and film festival submission packages will be created. This course is preparation for IB Film Studies. 145455 IB FILM STUDIES SL Grades 11-12 One year program Elective 145456 IB FILM STUDIES HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Elective IB Film is a course that can be taken at either the standard level (SL) or higher level (HL). For both levels of IB Film, the candidate must research and write an Independent Study, do a Practical Project and give an oral presentation based on the close analysis of a 5 minute extract from a film prescribed by the IBO.

146456 IB FILM STUDIES HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Elective IB Film aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making, this course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. IB Film Studies HL II enables students to more fully develop creative skills, theoretical understanding and textual analysis. This course is a continuation of IB Film HL I and extends the Independent Study, Practical Project, oral presentation and film interpretation.

Music 923407 SYMPHONIC BAND Grades 9-12 Elective Placement based on Audition Symphonic band welcomes all students who have prior experience or would like to begin an instrument. The course develops teach team work, collaboration, and self-discipline and is designed to teach the context and content of a variety of genres encouraging a lifelong appreciation for the arts. Differentiation is used at athletic, school, and community events. Annual performance trips include destinations such as Toronto, New York City, Atlanta, and Florida. 923507 WIND ENSEMBLE Grades 9-12 Placement based on Audition The Wind Ensemble is an auditioned group which performs the finest of advanced band literature. It is designed to teach team work, self-discipline, and develop higher level thinking skills necessary to express one's self through music. This is for the advanced player who can demonstrate a higher level of proficiency. Technical performance skills are refined. Students demonstrate the ability to transfer skills across content areas and apply concepts and skills to real-life situations. The ensemble performs at least three concerts during the year, as well as participating in clinics and contests adjudicated by the best music educators in the country. Performances include athletic functions, school and community events as well as annual performance trips which have included Toronto, New York City, Florida and Atlanta. The course includes smaller ensembles such as jazz, woodwind quintet, pit orchestra and brass ensembles. Students in wind ensemble often develop a lifelong appreciation and commitment to the arts.

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923391 CONTRACT BAND NC 923392 CONTRACT BAND C Grades 11-12 Elective Prerequisite: Wind Ensemble This ensemble is for diploma IB students unable to fit band into their junior and senior year schedules. Rehearsals for contract band take place before school, normally Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7:00 - 7:50 am. Contract band students perform the same music as the symphonic band in concerts, music festivals, and competitions. The course meets for one full year and students are awarded ½ credit upon completion of the full year. Students who choose to use the pass/fail option must adhere to the guidelines described on page 6. 928591 CONTRACT CHOIR NC 928592 CONTRACT CHOIR C Grades 9-12 Elective Contract Chorus is a performance-based class in which students learn the basics of vocal production and health, music theory, music history, and ensemble skills. Students learn and perform literature of all periods and styles and participate in school and community performances throughout the year. The course meets before school for one full year and students in grades 9-12 are awarded ½ credit upon completion of the full year. Students who choose to use the pass/fail option must adhere to the guidelines described on page 6. 924507 GUITAR I Grades 9-12 Elective No guitar experience is necessary to take this course. In Guitar I, the basics of guitar playing are introduced through a variety of repertoire from standards to popular and rock n’ roll pieces. Students learn all the skills necessary to get started playing all the music they love to listen to. Skills and topics covered include: Strumming, open chords, power chords, barre chords, finger picking, and reading music. 924607 GUITAR II Grades 9-12 Elective Prerequisite: Guitar I or Placement Audition Students already familiar with the skills from Guitar I and who want to experience music at a more in-depth level should sign up for Guitar II. Guitar II builds on the foundation of Guitar I and works on the process of turning you from a "Guitarist" into a "Musician." Guitar II covers advanced techniques such as picking, scales, music theory, ear training, chord analysis, and odd time signatures. An extensive unit on songwriting is covered, as well as stage performance technique. 924707 GUITAR III Grades 9-12 Elective Prerequisite: Guitar II or Placement Audition In Guitar III, students will continue their study of guitar and build upon the skills and techniques learned in Guitar II. More

emphasis will be placed on scales, solo technique, ensemble performance, and songwriting and recording technique. 924807 GUITAR IV Grades 9-12 Elective Prerequisite: Guitar III or Placement Audition In Guitar IV, students will continue their study of guitar and build upon the skills and techniques learned in Guitar III. Students will continue performing in ensembles as well as conduct self-study units in multiple genres of music, and formal composition lessons and techniques. 929707 DRUMS Grades 9-12 Elective Drums is a course where students of all abilities can learn to perform on drums, timpani, mallet and keyboard instruments as well as steel drums and other types of percussion instruments. Pianists are especially encouraged to enroll. Percussionists will be able to perform in a Percussion Ensemble, as well as perform with the concert and symphonic band. The repertoire ranges from classical transcriptions to contemporary jazz and world music. Membership is open to all interested students from the beginning to the advanced skill level. The DRUMS group will make numerous public appearances, including school and community events as well as performing on an annual trip. Past trips have included Toronto, New York City, Florida and Atlanta. 922555 IB MUSIC SL Grades 11-12 Elective 922556 IB MUSIC HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Elective The IB Music curriculum includes the study of all music including western and world music. The required IB Music components of the course include the following: western and world music study using prescribed scores; a musical investigation which includes the comparison of two different musical genres; and a solo or group performance recording. Students will also study basic music theory and write music using Sibelius notation software. This course is open to all musicians – instrumental, vocal, piano and guitar. 922596 IB MUSIC HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Elective Prerequisite: IB Music HL I In addition to a more in-depth examination of the topics studied in IB Music HL I, students prepare a portfolio of original compositions. This course prepares students for the higher level IB Music exam which includes listening, written, performance and composition components. 37

Photography 919307 PHOTOGRAPHY I Grades 10-12 Elective Photography I introduces the student to basic camera skills, film processing, and print development. The class is a survey of photographic procedures, styles and history, including early photographic techniques and wet darkroom processes. Digital imagery and editing will also be introduced. Students will be encouraged to see and frame the world creatively through the camera and explore a variety of subjects, themes and meanings. 919407 PHOTOGRAPHY II Grades 11-12 Elective Prerequisite: Photography I This advanced course in photography allows students to develop and refine techniques, processes and themes covered in Photography I. Digital imagery and editing will also be covered. Independent research into the history of photography and critical analysis of master photographers is an essential component of this class. Students are expected to be motivated, self-disciplined, focused photographers that are capable of completing projects independently.

Theatre 141007 THEATRE ARTS I 141091 SEM 1/141092 SEM 2 Grades 9-12 Elective This elective course is designed to expose students to all aspects of drama production including acting, principles of directing, makeup and costuming. In this hands-on course, students will be actively involved in a variety of theatrical experiences from improvisations to staging, writing, and acting in one-act plays. Principles and techniques learned in Theatre Arts can be used throughout the curriculum to enhance, energize and personalize education.

142007 THEATRE ARTS II Grades 10-12 Elective Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I As an elective, this theatre arts class allows the students to further explore the areas of theatre history and develop more extensively the student’s abilities in theatre production, improvisation, play writing and analysis. Exciting and mentally stimulating projects are what this course is about. Theatre games and activities create a comfortable yet motivating environment throughout the course. 143055 IB THEATRE SL Grades 11-12 Elective 143056 IB THEATRE HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Elective Students in this course will study the theatrical history of several cultures, analyze and interpret plays, study acting theory and techniques, develop their ability to perform in front of an audience, and study the basic principles of theatre production. This course prepares students for the IB Theatre SL exam. 143096 IB THEATRE HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Elective Prerequisite: IB Theatre HL I This is a two-year course of study. Students are enrolled in IB Theatre SL or IB Theatre HL I for the first year. In addition to the topics studied in IB Theatre SL/HL I, IB Theatre HL II students engage in an Individual Study project, chosen in consultation with the teacher, on a specific aspect of theatre arts. This course prepares students for the IB Theatre HL II exam.

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Wind Ensemble Symphonic Band Chamber Singers Concert Choir Guitar I

Theater I

Music

Theater

Arts Management

Music Therapy Music Business Music Law

Fashion

Jewelry

Photography

Theater Performance Theater Production

Music Performance

Arts Education

Theater

Fine Arts - Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking Music Composition

Music Education

Music

GM 12th IB Art SL or HL II Art I, II, III, IV Photography I, II Computer Graphics I, II Wind Ensemble Contract Band Chamber Singers Concert Choir IB Music SL IB Music HL II Guitar I, II, III, IV IB Theater SL IB Theater HL II Theater I, II

Theater Education

GM 11th IB Art SL or HL I Art I, II, III Photography I, II Computer Graphics I, II Wind Ensemble Contract Band Chamber Singers Concert Choir IB Music SL IB Music HL I Guitar I, II, III IB Theater SL IB Theater HL I Theater I, II

Career Opportunities in the Arts

Theater I, II

Wind Ensemble Symphonic Band Chamber Singers Concert Choir Guitar I, II

Art I,II Photography I Computer Graphics I, II

GM 10th

Graphic Arts / Design

Art

Art I Computer Graphics I

Art

GM 9th

FCCPS: Suggested Arts Course Sequence

Design (Career and Technical Education) The goal of the Design Department is to have students satisfy the requirements for the Career and Technical Education Seal or the Advanced Mathematics and Technology Seal before graduating from high school. The following Design programs are recognized by the Virginia State Department of Education and are currently offered at George Mason High School. Focus is placed on career pathways and provides the student with career exploration, self-assessment, and workplace readiness skills.

Business 613585 IB BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT SL Grades 11-12 Elective The IB Business and Management course is a rigorous and critical study of the ways in which individuals and groups interact in a dynamic business environment. It is an academic discipline that examines how business decisions are made and how these decisions make an impact on internal and external environments. It is designed to give students an understanding of business principles, practices, and skills. Emphasis is also placed on understanding technical innovation and day-to-day business functions of marketing, human resource management, and includes the application of tools and techniques of analysis to enhance the understanding of complex business activities finance. A credit in this course will fulfill the fine/practical art or an elective requirement for graduation.

social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design, These techniques represent proven approaches to developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems and large, complex problems.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

318586 IB COMPUTER SCIENCE HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Elective Prerequisite: AP Computer Science A Recommended: A grade of “B-“ or better in AP Computer Science A IB Computer Science HL I is a one-year course that concentrates on problem solving techniques and programming style while learning various data structures and algorithms in JAVA. Computer systems, social implications, and practical applications are integrated into the course. Students will take the standard level IB examination.

Students design, implement and interpret computer-based solutions to problems in several application areas, becoming knowledgeable about programming concepts, algorithm designs, and documentation of the computer solution. Computer Science classes count as elective credit and not mathematics credit towards graduation. 318584 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES Grade 9 – 12 Prerequisite: successful completion, or concurrent enrollment in Algebra I AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles will give students the opportunity to use technology to address real-world problems and build relevant solutions. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. 318685 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra I The AP Computer Science A course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data algorithms, analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and

318585 IB COMPUTER SCIENCE SL Grades 11-12 Elective Recommended: A grade of “B-“ or better in AP Computer Science A IB Computer Science SL is a one-year course that concentrates on problem solving techniques and programming style while learning various data structures and algorithms in JAVA. Computer systems, social implications, and practical applications are integrated into the course. Students will take the standard level IB examination.

318594 IB COMPUTER SCIENCE HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Elective Prerequisite: IB Computer Science HL I (Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in IB Computer Science HL I) This course is designed for those students who wish to continue their studies in computer science. The topics covered will prepare students to take the IB higher level Computer Science exam. Programs will be written in the object-oriented language, JAVA. Students will take the higher level IB Computer Science examination.

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Technology Education The following combination of electives will qualify you for CTE Completer status which will entitle you to a Virginia Board of Education CTE Seal of Achievement or Advanced Math and Technology Seal of Achievement:  Basic Technical Drawing, Engineering Drawing, and Architectural Drawing 843587 BASIC TECHNICAL DRAWING Grades 9-12 Elective Basic Technical Drawing and Design is a thorough introduction to CAD design. This involves techniques in two and three dimensional drawing and model making. Students will learn to design and build projects using some of the best computers in the high school as well as learn to use a variety of machines in our design shop. This is a great class for students who want to build a portfolio of work related to architecture, engineering, and three-dimensional design. 843687 ENGINEERING DRAWING Grades 10-12 Elective Prerequisite: Basic Technical Drawing Engineering Drawing builds on the foundation laid in basic technical drawing with more in-depth studies of the graphic language and methods of design for engineers, manufacturers and industrial designers. Students will be expected to acquire a working knowledge of a variety of CAD software, including AutoCAD and Inventor. We will employ these drawing skills to create solutions to structural and mechanical problems that can be constructed in our design shop. This class is meant to prepare students for a career in engineering, but is great for anyone who likes working with their hands and working with tools to invent and build. 843787 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING Grades 11-12 Elective Prerequisite: Basic Technical Drawing and Engineering Drawing Students who are interested in mechanical, structural, and spatial design can develop a comprehensive portfolio to the specific technical interests of each student. We want to encourage independent exploration in topics that will help you develop a formal portfolio of the design work you hope to pursue at the college level. This could include portfolio work in architectural design, interior design, construction, prototyping, or three-dimensional visualization. 842107 ROBOTICS I Grades 9-12 This is a yearlong course designed to further integrate our robotics program into the academic day. Students will learn to visualize and design mechanical ideas, work with a variety of building materials, learn to wire electronics, test sensor feedback capabilities, work in design teams, document their work, and attend local competitions. Competitions might include the FIRST tech challenge, a mid-sized design problem that competes in December, and the AAIA organized robotics

aircraft competition. Students will also undertake small design and build projects to improve their skills at solving mechanical problems or successfully programming electronic interfaces. Robotics as an extracurricular activity has helped prepare students for careers in engineering, technology and creative problem solving. In this class, students will be expected to work independently as well as be part of a team, in order to develop solutions to a variety of design challenges. No previous experience is necessary, but you should be willing to try new things, work hard, meet deadlines, and test your ideas in order to produce a functional and successful design. 842207 ROBOTICS II Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Robotics I Robotics II builds on the foundation of Robotics I and works on furthering student portfolios. Students will continue to design robots, write code, engineer, document and prototype. As in Robotics I, students may participate in multiple competitions.

849784 TV & MEDIA PRODUCTION I Grades 9-12 Elective In this course, students learn the basics of broadcast journalism including: filming basics, video editing, lighting, audio, preproduction, scriptwriting, storyboarding, and advanced storytelling methods. Students will be responsible for producing a daily live broadcast for George Mason High School which previews upcoming events and information and includes video packages of news stories created by students. Additionally, students will work on longer-term video news projects and develop journalism skills such as reporting, interviewing, producing, and editing. The aim of the course is to give students interested in broadcast journalism exposure to the field and provide an opportunity for students to concentrate on specific skills within the field. 849785 TV & MEDIA PRODUCTION II Grades 10-12 Elective Prerequisite: TV & Media Production I TV and Media Production II models a commercial production studio. Students are expected to take on a leadership role and facilitate production of creative projects. Projects may be produced for competitions, clients and community partners. Students also are given the opportunity to produce independent projects, such as original short films or documentaries. These projects teach students the media production business while helping them to build professional portfolios that will set them apart from their peers. This advantage may lead to awards, internships, scholarships, and successful higher education and career paths.

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English Learners (EL) The EL program (formerly English for Speakers of Other Languages, “ESOL”) goals:  To facilitate the rapid acquisition of English literacy and academic skills for students to successfully participate in the general education program.  To provide instruction that supports the cultural as well as linguistic needs of the students.  To promote the contributions of different cultures and languages to our society. MONITOR STATUS Monitored students no longer take EL classes, but they are provided services through the EL Department. Their progress is monitored in their general education classes. Testing and instructional accommodations are provided to monitored students and instructional support is provided to their general education teachers. EL services may include co-taught general education classes, individualized tutoring, supplemental materials, translation services, alternative assessments, and parental outreach. EL co-taught general education classes and EL content area support classes are offered on an as-needed basis. EL courses are designed for the non-native speaker of English with limited English proficiency. Screening tests are given at the time of registration to determine student placement. Exit testing, teacher recommendation, and administrative approval are required before a student moves to the next course level or exits to general education classes. High school credits are provided for EL classes in grades 9-12. 571099 EL 1 Grades 9-12 This course provides a balanced approach to language acquisition through the development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students learn basic vocabulary and structure and apply these in authentic conversations and situations. Beginning writing skills in mechanics and expression are developed and practiced. Additional vocabulary and relevant cultural information is introduced through short texts, recordings and videos. 572099 EL 2 Grades 9-12 In this course students build on their basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing. There is continued focus on interactive oral communication and increased emphasis on developing reading and writing skills. More complex language structure and a wider range of vocabulary and idioms are acquired through conversational activities, readings and short essays. 573047 EL 3 Grades 9-12 This course focuses on continued language development through the exploration of various themes. With each theme, students focus on academic reading and writing skills, the intensive study of English grammar, and vocabulary building. The readings are taken from a variety of genres. In addition,

students use the writing process to produce persuasive essays, personal narratives, fiction and a research paper. Students are also given opportunities to develop their oral language through class discussions, small group work and class presentations. 573147 EL 4 Grades 9-12 This advanced EL course follows a similar format to the EL 3 class emphasizing continued language development through the exploration of various themes. With each theme, students focus on academic reading and writing skills, the intensive study of English grammar and vocabulary building. Students are also given opportunities to develop their oral language through class discussions, small group work and class presentations. 571097 EL CONCEPTS SCIENCE/ SOCIAL STUDIES Grades 9-12 This course is designed to provide students with the skills and background knowledge they will need as they transition into general education science and social studies classes. Such skills include note taking, reading for understanding, research skills, vocabulary building strategies and writing lab reports. 572097 EL CONCEPTS SCIENCE/ SOCIAL STUDIES 2 Grades 9-12 In this course students will continue to work on the background knowledge and skills that they will need as they transition into general education science and social studies classes. Such skills include note taking, reading for understanding, research skills, vocabulary building strategies and writing lab reports. In addition, students will be given academic support for their general education classes. 118047 READING STRATEGIES EL 118091 SEM 1 / 118092 SEM 2 Grades 9-12 Elective Reading Strategies EL is a highly specialized reading course designed to support EL students and students for whom English is not a first language. In this course, a reading specialist will work with students to develop robust vocabulary in English, expand use of comprehension strategies and improve various writing skills, including writing according to various text structures, employing correct grammar, and developing notetaking strategies. In addition, students will be supported in their content area studies. This course may be taken more than once for credit. Students may take this course as a semester course or a full year course. 44

Individuals and Societies (Social Studies) Students must take three years of Individuals and Societies for a Standard Diploma and four years of Individuals and Societies for an Advanced Studies Diploma. Courses which fulfill these requirements include World Civilizations and Geography, U.S. Government or AP Government, U.S. History, U.S. History DE, or IB History of the Americas HL, IB World History HL, IB World History SL and Modern World History. (Students may not enroll in both IB World History and Modern World History.) All students are encouraged to take four years of Individuals and Societies, and most competitive colleges expect students to take an Individuals and Societies course each year of high school. For the International Baccalaureate Diploma, students must take one higher or standard level exam in Individuals and Societies. Higher level courses are two-year courses taken in both the junior and senior years, standard level courses are one-year courses taken either in the junior or senior year. History and Psychology are offered at the higher level, and History, Psychology, Economics, Business and Anthropology are offered at the standard level. For the suggested Individuals and Societies course sequence, please refer to the chart following the course descriptions. 221607 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS AND GEOGRAPHY II Grade 9 This course surveys the historical achievements of humanity from 1500 CE to the present. Students are introduced to historical periods, including the Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Exploration, Enlightenment, French and Industrial Revolutions, as well as significant 20th century events such as World Wars I and II and the Cold War. At the end of the year, students take the World Civilizations and Geography II SOL test. 244007 CP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT Grade 10 This course studies the structure and function of the U.S. national and state governments with an emphasis on citizenship and decision-making. Topics of study include: theory and structure of the federal government, civil rights, civil liberties, the political process, elections, and state and local governments. 244555 AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT & POLITICS Grade 10 Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in World Civilization and Geography II This course is a recommended prerequisite for the IB History sequence in the eleventh and twelfth grades. It fulfills the U.S. Government requirement for graduation and prepares students for the AP Exam in Government, introducing political theory and examining the constitutional basis of the U.S. Government. The class will cover the basic institutions of national, state, and local government and how public policy is made and executed. Through current events and historical examples, students will analyze political beliefs and behavior, the role of political parties, elections, special interest groups, and the media in the political process, and civil rights and civil liberties. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the national AP Government Examination administered each May by the College Board, which may earn them early college and/or university credit. 236008 CP UNITED STATES HISTORY Grade 11 This course is a chronological review of United States history. Students are encouraged to analyze material on their own, as well as apply research skills. Units of study include: the Colonial Period, Independence, Nation Building, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrial Expansion, Colonialism, Nationalism,

World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and Civil Rights. At the end of the year, students take the United States/Virginia History SOL test. 236006 US HISTORY DUAL ENROLLMENT Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Students must meet NOVA’s enrollment requirements This course, which is offered in partnership with Northern Virginia Community College is a college-level survey course that enables students to receive high school credit for Virginia and U.S.History as well as the potential for up to 6 college credits. The first semester of the course corresponds with HIS 121 at Northern Virginia Community College, which covers American history from the arrival of Columbus until the Reconstruction era. The second semester of the course corresponds with HIS 122 and covers the era of Industrialization to modern day. The overall purpose of DE U.S. History is to provide students with the opportunity to receive college credits while teaching them the development of skills that will be beneficial as they progress through their education. At the end of the year, students take the United States History SOL test. Note: Only semester grades will be issued for this course. 236056 IB HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS HL Grade 11 (Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in AP United States Government & Politics) In 11th grade IB History of the Americas, students acquire and develop an understanding of in-depth historical knowledge of United States history and Latin American history over a 100 year period – 1850s to 1960s. Mexico is used as a case study country for Latin America throughout the course of study. This course is also designed to promote an appreciation and understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods and interpretations. During the school year, students are required to complete a research paper related to the IB curriculum on United States history or Latin American history. At the end of the year, students take the United States/Virginia History SOL test. The IB assessment for the IB History of the Americas HL will be at the end of the senior year and completion of the IB World History HL. This course is a required course for students interested in taking IB World History HL in their senior year (see course description below). 45

236155 IB WORLD HISTORY SL Grade 12 Prerequisite: CP United States History 236196 IB WORLD HISTORY HL Grade 12 Prerequisite: IB History of the Americas HL In 12th grade IB World History students study three topics from 20th century world history: the rise and rule of single-party states; the Cold War, and a case study on apartheid in South Africa. For seniors taking this course HL, this course is a continuation of the IB Americas class that they took as 11th graders. Seniors are also allowed to take this course SL after consultation with his/her 11th grade U.S. history teacher (students should have good reading and essay writing skills). This course is designed to promote the acquisition and understanding of in-depth historical knowledge across different cultures; an appreciation and understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods and interpretations; international awareness and understanding of people living in diverse places and at different times; a better understanding of the present through an understanding of the past; an appreciation of the historical dimension of the human condition; and an ability to use and communicate historical knowledge and understanding. During the school year students are required to complete research that leads into their IB internal assessment for this course.

238707 MODERN WORLD HISTORY Grades 10-12 Elective (Recommended: Successful completion of World Civilizations and Geography II) Modern World History is a course designed for students who enjoy history and are not taking the IB History sequence. This class will provide students the opportunity to study the history of the world in which they live. The focus of study is on the major political, social, and economic issues and events of the last two centuries. This course is for students interested in understanding the current world condition. May fulfill World History graduation requirement but does not prepare students for the SOL test.

Sample Course Sequences: Individuals and Societies 9th

College Prep World Civilizations & Geography II

IB Certificate World Civilizations & Geography II

IB Diploma World Civilizations & Geography II

10th

U.S. Government

U.S. Government

AP U.S. Government

11th

U. S. History

U. S. History IB History of the Americas HL IB Psychology SL IB Social & Cultural Anthropology SL IB Psychology HL IB Economics SL IB Business & Management SL

IB History of the Americas HL IB Psychology SL IB Social & Cultural Anthropology SL IB Psychology HL IB Economics SL IB Business & Management SL

12th

Individuals and Societies Elective

IB World History HL IB World History SL IB Psychology SL IB Social & Cultural Anthropology SL IB Psychology HL IB Economics SL IB Business & Management SL

IB World History HL IB World History SL IB Psychology HL IB Psychology SL IB Social & Cultural Anthropology SL IB Economics SL IB Business & Management SL

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INTERDISCIPLINARY ELECTIVES 612017 ECONOMICS AND PERSONAL FINANCE This course is a graduation requirement* Grades 10-12 Elective (Full year course, but semesters may be divided) Recommended: Successful completion of Algebra I *The Virginia Department of Education has made the Economics and Personal Finance course a graduation requirement for the Class of 2015 and beyond. Economics and Personal Finance is a two semester elective class that will help students navigate the financial challenges and economic decisions they will encounter after graduation. From creating a budget to banking, establishing good credit and understanding supply & demand. Economics and Personal Finance is an effective first step for students to learn to manage money, make sound financial decisions and understand how the economic world works. Topics covered will include, but not be limited to, basic economic concepts, basic economic structures, the role of producers and consumers in a market economy, supply and demand, the factors that impact personal income, different economic systems, the role and goals of government in a market economy, the global economy, financial planning, insurance, financial record keeping, consumer skills, identity protection, banking services, credit, loans, renting an apartment, creating a budget, establishing and maintaining good credit, the different types of investments (including stocks, bonds, and mutual funds), how taxes work, and preparing a tax return. The WISE assessment will be given as a part of this class. A passing score on the exam is one of the ways in which you can satisfy the certification requirement for a standard diploma. 117107 CREATIVE WRITING I (YR) 117191 S1 / 117192 S2 Grades 9-12 Elective Creative Writing is for students who enjoy writing. Creative Writing is devoted to the highly demanding art of creative writing in all its various genres, including poetry, drama, prose, prose fiction, and non-fiction. Creative Writing will focus on the generating and sharing of original material. Students will revise their work in writing workshop groups. Participants must be willing to share their own writing. Students will gain instruction and inspiration from essays on writing and famous author’s works. This class is for students who approach their individual lives, and society at large with humor, intelligence, sensitivity, and a thirst for language. It’s a course for individuals who want to share their hearts and minds through solitary writing, then collaborative revision and study, and communal publication and performance. It’s for writers and for people who want to be better writers. Participants must be willing to share their writing.

117207 CREATIVE WRITING II (YR) Grades 10-12 Elective Creative Writing II is for students who want to enhance, refine, and expand their writing portfolio. This course is for independent and motivated writers who are devoted to continual improvement in all genres of writing, including but not limited to fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. It also encourages students to generate original material with a strong focus on writing workshop and revision, as well as an emphasis on publication. Creative Writing II students will lead classroom mini-lessons on various components of writing and be leaders and mentors for the Creative Writing I students, especially in the workshop environment. 120007 JOURNALISM I (YR) 120091 JOURNALISM (SEM I) Grades 9-12 Elective Journalism I is both theoretical and practical in nature. Students learn journalism theory including units on history, First Amendment, deadlines, style, and editing techniques and then apply this knowledge to their writing. Students write, copy, and also produce broadcast news, feature, and sports content to be published on Lasso Online. All journalism students complete professional goals including marketing and advertising sales, attending national scholastic conferences (CSPA), entering national scholastic journalism contests, and networking with professionals in the field. 121007 JOURNALISM II Grades 10-12 Elective Prerequisite: Journalism I This course is both theoretical and practical in nature. Students refine and polish their skills as news, feature, sports and editorial writers. Students will apply these skills directly as they work on the electronic student newspaper, Lasso Online, in leadership positions which they apply for, such as Editor-in-Chief, section editors, ad managers, etc. As second year journalists, students will be expected to contribute regular stories to this paper, edit and proofread the articles of their peers, and manage a news section of their peers. Students will have myriad publishing opportunities. In addition, students will continue to study such related topics as journalistic ethics, history and practices. The content moves in sync with the Journalism I course.

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122007 JOURNALISM III 123007 JOURNALISM IV Grades 11-12 Elective Prerequisite: Journalism II Journalism III and IV are an extension of Journalism II. This course is both theoretical and practical in nature. Students refine and polish their skills as news, feature, sports and editorial writers. Students will apply these skills directly as they work on the electronic student newspaper, Lasso Online, in leadership positions which they apply for, such as Editor-in-Chief, section editors, ad managers, etc. As journalists, students will be expected to contribute regular stories to this paper, edit and proofread the articles of their peers, and manage a news section of their peers. Students will have myriad publishing opportunities. In addition, students will continue to study such related topics as journalistic ethics, history and practices. The content moves in sync with the Journalism I course. 121507 YEARBOOK/ PHOTOJOURNALISM I: INTRODUCTION TO YEARBOOK Grades 9-12 Elective Yearbook/Photojournalism I is a year-long elective course in which students learn the publication, layout, design, organization and leadership skills necessary to produce a yearbook. Substantial work outside of the class meeting time will be required of all students in the course. Students learn technical skills as well as teamwork and time management skills. All aspects of publication are covered, including: organization and planning, press law and legal issues, business management and sales, layout and design, time management, photographic and written communication, copy and proofreading, and the use of design software, photo editing programs and online tools for gathering and publishing information. This course may be taken as a contract course with teacher approval. 121607 YEARBOOK/PHOTOJOURNALISM II: ADVANCED STUDIES Grades 10-12 Elective Prerequisite: Yearbook I Yearbook/Photojournalism II is an extension of Yearbook I. This is a year-long elective course in which students learn the publication, layout, design, organization and leadership skills necessary to produce a yearbook. Substantial work outside of the class meeting time will be required of all students in the course. Students learn technical skills as well as teamwork and time management skills. Students will apply these skills directly as they work on the school yearbook in leadership positions which they apply for. All aspects of publication are covered, including: organization and planning, press law and legal issues, business management and sales, layout and design, time management, photographic and written communication, copy and proofreading, and the use of design software, photo editing programs and online tools for gathering and publishing

information. This course may be taken as a contract course with teacher approval. 121707 YEARBOOK/ PHOTOJOURNALISM III: ADVANCED STUDIES Grades 11-12 Elective Prerequisite: Yearbook II Yearbook/Photojournalism III is an extension of Yearbook II. This is a year-long elective course in which students learn the publication, layout, design, organization and leadership skills necessary to produce a yearbook. Substantial work outside of the class meeting time will be required of all students in the course. Students learn technical skills as well as teamwork and time management skills. Students will apply these skills directly as they work on the school yearbook in leadership positions such as Editor, Business Manager etc. which they apply for. All aspects of publication are covered, including: organization and planning, press law and legal issues, business management and sales, layout and design, time management, photographic and written communication, copy and proofreading, and the use of design software, photo editing programs and online tools for gathering and publishing information. This course may be taken as a contract course with teacher approval. 118007 READING STRATEGIES 118093 Grades 9-12 (SEM) Elective Reading Strategies is a highly specialized reading course designed to provide remedial support to students whose reading level falls below grade level. In this course, a reading specialist will work with students to improve accuracy of word recognition, increase fluency, develop robust vocabulary, expand use of comprehension strategies, and improve various writing skills, including note-taking strategies. This course may be taken more than once for credit. Students may take this course as a semester course or a full year course. 319902 MATH SKILLS T2 Grades 9-10 Required: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra I or Geometry This is a one-semester course for which students can earn elective credit for a passing grade. The objective of this course is to identify areas in the Algebra I/Geometry curriculum that need to be strengthened for each student, so that they can be successful in their math class and on the Algebra I/Geometry SOL. Students will use a variety of technology and online resources in addition to teacher support to build algebraic knowledge and skills. Students may remain in the course during Semester 2, or they may exit the course after Semester 1.

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CHAMPIONSHIP TRAINING Grades 9-12 Elective, 1 or 2 Semesters For registration purposes, Championship Training has two numbers – one for the Fall Semester and one for the Spring Semester. All students should register using course numbers #764191 and/or #764192. Students will be placed at the appropriate level after registration.

training protocols. Students will be introduced to training concepts designed to develop and enhance the individual’s level of physical training fitness in the areas of speed, agility, reaction skills, and advanced physical conditioning. This course also provides a unique opportunity for students to examine and develop their personal goals and values system by the teaching of self-image, positive attitude, character, leadership, goalorientation, and managing adversity.

764191 CHAMP TRAINING I SEM 1 764192 CHAMP TRAINING I SEM 2 This course introduces the student to anatomy and the mechanics of body movement with respect to muscle proprioception (communication with the brain resulting in muscle action). Students will apply the principles of muscle proprioception by utilizing instability balls as their primary training tool. Functional, stable and dynamic movements will be emphasized as avenues of improving physical performance and reducing the risk of injury. Students will be introduced to training concepts designed to develop and enhance the individual’s level of physical training fitness in the areas of speed, agility, reaction skills, and advanced physical conditioning. This course also provides a unique opportunity for students to examine and develop their personal goals and values system by the teaching of self-image, positive attitude, character, leadership, goal-orientation, and managing adversity.

764491 CHAMP TRAINING IV SEM 1 764492 CHAMP TRAINING IV SEM 2 This course introduces the student to the principles of sportspecific performance training. The student will acquire an understanding of the physiological and neurological responses that result from proper training techniques. The relationship between proper nutrition and optimal physical and mental performance will be explored. An application of the principles of sport-specific performance training and sports nutrition will be stressed. Students will develop an understanding of the essential components of program design (needs analysis, program-design variables, rest & recovery, exercise selection & ordering, and training cycles). That understanding will be applied toward the development of a comprehensive training protocol that meets the performance requirements of a specific sport or training event. Students will be introduced to training concepts designed to develop and enhance the individual’s level of physical training fitness in the areas of speed, agility, reaction skills, and advanced physical conditioning. This course also provides a unique opportunity for students to examine and develop their personal goals and values system by the teaching of self-image, positive attitude, character, leadership, goalorientation, and managing adversity.

764291 CHAMP TRAINING II SEM 1 764292 CHAMP TRAINING II SEM 2 This course introduces the student to various methods of resistance training as a means of enhancing muscular strength and endurance, optimizing lean body mass, and increasing metabolic efficiency. Students will develop an understanding of the joint-movement patterns essential for safely executing resistance training exercises. Students will acquire an understanding of how the body’s muscles adapt to physical conditioning and strength training. Students will be introduced to training concepts designed to develop and enhance the individual’s level of physical training fitness in the areas of speed, agility, reaction skills, and advanced physical conditioning. This course also provides a unique opportunity for students to examine and develop their personal goals and values system by the teaching of self-image, positive attitude, character, leadership, goal-orientation, and managing adversity. 764391 CHAMP TRAINING III SEM 1 764392 CHAMP TRAINING III SEM 2 This course introduces students to the principles of strength training and injury prevention. Students will acquire an understanding of the concepts of strength training for the development of power, strength, explosiveness, and hypertrophy. A foundation of knowledge emphasizing proper preparation for training will be developed. Students will be introduced to the concepts of training specificity and periodization. A knowledge of those concepts will be applied by students in developing individual and group training goals and

281007 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 281091 SEM 1 / 281092 SEM 2 Grades 10-12 Elective Recommended: Successful completion of World Civilizations and Geography I and II What can we do about terrorism, the growing gap between rich and poor, global warming, the proliferation of nuclear weapons, and AIDS in Africa? These are just some of the topics this course is designed to address by inspiring students to research, debate, and discuss the most important global issues of our time. Students will examine such issues as international law, human rights, politics, diplomacy, economics of wealth and opportunity, trade, security, balance of power, use of resources, the environment, and war and conflict. Students will be challenged to view these issues not just from an American viewpoint, but from an international point of view by focusing on the historical, political, cultural, environmental, and ethnic differences of all those involved. Students will apply the lessons of world history to the unique challenges of our world today. Students will listen to guest speakers involved in international affairs. 49

237455 IB SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY SL Grades 11-12 Elective Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in previous Individuals in Society courses Offered at the standard level IB, Social and Cultural Anthropology is designed to introduce students to the universal principles of social and cultural life and to characteristics of specific societies and cultures. The course will cover the underlying anthropological principles related to ways of understanding society and culture, key anthropological concepts, methods and techniques used in field research, the nature of ethnography, and the applied relevance of social and cultural anthropology. The primary themes of the course include social organization, systems of belief and knowledge, and the process of cultural change and transformation. All students will study from a selection of topics such as foodgetting, social stratification, kinship, marriage, gender, religion, art, language, economics, and political organization. Students are required to conduct an anthropological observation and provide criticism and analysis of their own observation. Students are also required to read three ethnographies and apply their anthropological understanding of these readings. 290055 IB PSYCHOLOGY SL Grades 11-12 Elective Students will study human behaviors from the biological, cognitive, and sociocultural levels of analysis. The course also introduces students to diverse methods of psychological inquiry and applications such as health psychology, life-span psychology, abnormal psychology, the psychology of human relationships, and sports psychology. Students will study one of these applications in depth for the IB external assessment. Students must complete an experimental study as part of their Internal Assessment and take the IB exam. 290056 IB PSYCHOLOGY HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Elective Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in previous Individuals in Society course This course is the first part of a two-year long course in Psychology. The course guides students through the study of behavior by examining behavior at three levels of analysis: biological, cognitive, and socio-cultural. Students study two of five options: abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, health psychology, psychology of human relationships, and sport psychology. Students also study diverse quantitative and qualitative research methods including experiments, case studies, interviews, and observations. Finally, all students are required to conduct one experimental study.

290096 IB PSYCHOLOGY HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Elective Prerequisite: IB Psychology HL I This course is the second part of a two-year long course in Psychology. The course guides students through the study of behavior by examining behavior at three levels of analyses: biological, cognitive, and socio-cultural. Students also study two of five options: abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, health psychology, psychology of human relationships, and sport psychology. Students also study diverse quantitative and qualitative research methods including experiments, case studies, interviews, and observations. Finally, all students are required to conduct one experimental study. 119755 IB THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE Grade 11 Elective, 1 semester 119855 IB THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE Grade 12 Elective, 1 semester Students reflect upon, study, and analyze knowledge as a process. The object of this study is not to gain further expertise in any particular academic discipline, but to gain a deeper understanding of the range and limits of human knowledge through the examination of the assumptions and presuppositions on which various academic subjects and belief systems are based. Through the study of the theoretical foundations of the different branches of human knowledge, students are enabled to unify and to think critically about the knowledge they have acquired in a specialized and dispersed fashion throughout their schooling. This course is required for students who are working to earn an IB Diploma and also may be taken as an IB certificate course. Units of study include: the nature of knowledge, ways of knowing such as language, reason, sense perception, emotion and others, and comparison of the different areas of knowledge such as mathematics, natural sciences, human sciences, history, the arts and the type of knowledge they provide. 280655 IB ECONOMICS SL Grades 11-12 Elective This course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an 50

increasingly interdependent world. Elements of Financial literacy are integrated into the course so that the Virginia State graduation requirements for Economics Education and Financial Literacy are satisfied. Students complete a portfolio of internal assessment (IA) commentaries on microeconomics, macroeconomics, and international economics topics. 613585 IB BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT SL Grades 11-12 Elective The IB Business and Management course is a rigorous and critical study of the ways in which individuals and groups interact in a dynamic business environment. It is an academic discipline that examines how business decisions are made and how these decisions make an impact on internal and external environments. It is designed to give students an understanding of business principles, practices, and skills. Emphasis is also placed on understanding technical innovation and day-to-day business functions of marketing, human resource management, and includes the application of tools and techniques of analysis to enhance the understanding of complex business activities finance. A credit in this course will fulfill the fine/practical art or an elective requirement for graduation.

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Language and Literature (English) The Language and Literature program strives to provide the strongest and most meaningful challenges for each student. All levels of study lead to a student’s successful completion of the requirements for graduation and satisfy the Virginia English Standards of Learning. 113018 ENGLISH 9 Genre Study English 9 introduces students to the major genres (poetry, fiction, nonfiction and drama) and their principal characteristics. Students examine many universal themes in literature while continually working on their reading and writing skills. The course exposes students to a wide variety of language arts experiences, including literature study, a review of the conventions of the language, research skills, and oral communication with a focus on the writing process: prewriting, writing, editing, and rewriting. Differentiation will occur for students on some written assignments, presentations and the level of expectations related to these assessments. This course prepares the student to choose between English 10 and Honors English 10. 113009 HONORS ENGLISH 9 Genre Study Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Honors English 8 or a “B+” or better in English 8 Honors English 9 follows the same basic format and curriculum as English 9 but is taught at a more accelerated pace. Students read more selections and are presented with more complex topics both in discussion and in writing assignments. Students will work toward gaining independence in the writing process. Honors English 9 prepares students for Honors English 10. 114018 ENGLISH 10 American Literature English 10 is a study of American literature that highlights this country’s major literary movements and its representative authors. Interspersed throughout the year will be units on writing instruction, creative writing, and vocabulary improvement. It exposes students to a wide variety of language arts experiences including American literature study, the writing process, a review of the conventions of the language, research skills, and oral communication. Differentiation will occur for students on some written assignments, presentations and the level of expectations related to these assessments. This course is designed to enhance students’ cultural literacy and critical thinking to prepare them for English 11, IB SL English Language and Literature or IB HL English Literature. 114009 HONORS ENGLISH 10 American Literature Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Honors English 9 or a “B+” or better in English 9 Honors English 10 provides students with an overview of American literature while introducing students to the academic skills necessary for IB English courses. Students examine a wide

selection of American literature in order to gain a perspective of its origins in thought and tradition. Honors English 10 follows the same basic format and curriculum as English 10 but is taught at a more accelerated pace. Students read more selections and are presented with more complex topics both in discussion and as writing assignments. The course prepares students for either of the offered IB English courses, SL Language and Literature or HL Literature. 115118 ENGLISH 11 World Literature English 11 is the study of literature from around the world with a focus on texts and various text types, both fiction and nonfiction, written from perspectives that offer students a view that may be different from their own. Students will engage in a review of the conventions of language, research skills and oral communication. Because the literature covered in class is often set in a culture and or time period different from their own, students will investigate the context in which the works were created as well. Students will write often in a variety of forms and will use a process approach to writing that involves brainstorming, prewriting, drafting, editing, and revising, with a particular focus on persuasion. Grammar, spelling, usage, and mechanics will be emphasized in conjunction with the writing process. Differentiation will occur for students on some written assignments, presentations and the level of expectations related to these assessments. During the second semester, students will take the SOL End-of-Course Exams in reading and writing. This course prepares students to take English 12. 115155 IB ENGLISH A: LANGUAGE and LITERATURE 11 SL World Literature First year of a two-year program Recommended for IB SL: A grade of “B” or better in Honors English 10 or a “B+” in English 10. IB English Language and Literature 11 SL is a course that promotes an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, how we see and understand the world in which we live. A key aim of the course is to encourage all students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. Students in the course develop the skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culture. It encourages students to think critically about the interactions with and among texts, the audiences, and the purposes. This course is unlike the IB English Literature 11 HL course in that it: has a broader definition of “text,” does not solely focus on literary analysis, has fewer texts studied, and promotes the cultural understandings of language. 52

Students are expected to complete the IB assessments comprised of three presentations, three written tasks, one essay, and one text analysis. SL students should be independently motivated to complete the IB assessments. The IB Language and Literature 11 SL course is the first year of a twoyear course, and students who wish to enroll in the IB 12 SL course must have completed the IB assessments designated in eleventh grade and have successfully completed the first year of the two-year SL course. In addition, during the second semester, students will take both Virginia State End of Course SOL exams in reading and writing. 115056 IB ENGLISH A: LITERATURE 11 HL World Literature First year of a two-year program Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Honors English 10 or a “B+” English 10. IB Language A: Literature HL students will study the works in Parts I and IV of the IB curriculum. The major texts are selected from a broad IB list of prescribed authors and works representing different cultures and languages in translation. This course promotes an appreciation of literature and knowledge of a student’s own culture and that of other societies. A detailed study of literary devices and their effect on a work is central to the HL curriculum. The HL classroom environment is student-centered and requires each student to be actively engaged in critical thinking and discussion. The course is designed to develop students’ power of expression in both oral and written communication to prepare them for the IB assessments. Over the two-year course, the IB grade will be comprised of two presentations, one written assignment, and two essays. HL students should be independently motivated to complete the IB assessments. During the second semester, students will take both Virginia State End of Course SOL exams in reading and writing. Students must complete both IB internal and external assessments in order to continue in IB Language A: Literature HL in 12th grade. 116207 ENGLISH 12 Perspectives in Literature English 12 is the study of literature that allows students to critically analyze and interpret written and spoken texts from a wide range of literary and non-literary genres. Students will develop their power of expression in both oral and written communication, as well as their ability to present their ideas effectively. Students will write often and in a variety of forms, including personal narrative writing with a focus on reflection. Grammar, spelling, usage, and mechanics will be emphasized in conjunction with the writing process. A key aim is critical literacy. Differentiation will occur for students on some written assignments, presentations and assessments as needed.

116095 IB ENGLISH A: LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 12 SL Second year of a two-year program Prerequisite: IB English A: Language & Literature 11 SL Recommended for IB SL: A grade of “B” or better in IB English A: Language and Literature 11 SL; completion of external and internal IB assessments. The IB Language and Literature 12 SL course is the second of a two-year course, and students who wish to enroll in the IB 12 SL course must have satisfied the IB assessments completed in eleventh grade and have successfully completed the first year of the two-year SL course. All students enrolled in the SL course will study Parts I and III of the IB curriculum, which allows students to explore English through its cultural development and use, its media forms and functions, and its literature. The course is designed to develop students’ power of expression in both oral and written communication. All students will critically analyze and interpret written communication. All students will critically analyze and interpret written and spoken texts from a wide range of literary and non-literary genres. Students develop skills of literary and textual analysis and the ability to present their ideas effectively. A key aim is the development of critical literacy. Students who are registered for the SL program are required to complete all IB assessments in addition to the assigned assessments and examinations for the course. 116096 IB ENGLISH A: LITERATURE 12 HL Detailed & Genre Study Second year of a two-year program Prerequisite: IB English A: Literature 11 HL Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in IB English A: Literature 11 HL; completion of external and internal IB assessments. IB Language A: Literature HL students will study the works in Parts II and III of the IB curriculum. Because IB HL is a two-year course, students who wish to enroll in IB 12 HL must have completed the IB assessments conducted in IB HL 11. The course is designed to develop students’ power of expression in both oral and written communication to prepare them for the internal and external IB assessments. The HL classroom environment is student-centered and requires each student to be actively engaged in critical thinking and discussion. HL students should be independently motivated to complete the IB assessments. Oral and written examinations are used to assess students’ language skills, their ability to critically analyze familiar and unfamiliar texts and to offer a personal and independent response to literature. The emphasis of senior year is the detailed study of works and the conventions of genres.

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160206 ENGLISH 12 DUAL ENROLLMENT Prerequisite: Meets NOVA’s enrollment requirements English 12 Dual Enrollment is the NOVA English 111 and 112 course for which students can earn up to 6 NOVA college credits while also earning the credit necessary for the high school diploma. Students will receive two grades for these courses: one for English 12 DE course on your high school transcript and one for your NOVA college transcript. English 111 is a freshman level college course that introduces students to critical thinking and the fundamentals of academic writing. Through the writing process, students refine topics; develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate and incorporate appropriate resources; edit for effective style and usage; and determine appropriate approaches for a variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes. Writing activities will include exposition and argumentation with 4 or more types of writing products during the first semester and at least one researched essay. During the second semester of the course, which is English 112, students continue to develop college writing with increased emphasis on critical essays, argumentation, and research. These competencies are developed through the examination of a range of texts about the human experience. This part of the course requires students to locate, evaluate, integrate, and document sources and effectively edit for style and usage. English 112 will teach students to understand and apply rhetorical principles of argument, as applied to literature, nonfiction prose, and other cultural texts in order to improve persuasion in their writing. Writing activities will include exposition and argumentation with 4 or more types of writing products during the second semester and at least one researched essay. Completion of English 111 and English 112 will prepare students for all expected college writing and for writing in the workplace through understanding the writing process and creation of effective texts.

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LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (World Languages) Students at George Mason High School are encouraged to study Language Acquisition in order to satisfy state requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma, prepare for future studies at the university level, enhance their knowledge of the world and participate as global citizens in the 21st century. Most four-year colleges require a minimum of two years of foreign language study for admission. Students are encouraged to thoroughly investigate the requirements of the college or university of their choice and should check with prospective colleges before mapping out their high school foreign language classes. World Language requirements for the Advanced Studies Diploma are two years of two languages or three years of one language. Students in the IB program will take IB Spanish, French, or Mandarin Chinese SL I or HL I in the junior year, and IB Spanish, French, or Mandarin Chinese SL II or HL II (and the corresponding SL or HL examination) in the senior year. Students who take AP Spanish IV as 10th graders may opt to take the SL II course and examination in the junior year. There are extraordinary situations when students need to accelerate language study, for example, in order to prepare for an IB examination in pursuit of the IB Diploma, or to satisfy Advanced Studies Diploma requirements. In order to do so, in lieu of taking a high school level class at George Mason, students may dual enroll in a college-level course. Arrangements must be made with the current language teacher, the Language Acquisition Department Leader and the counselor prior to taking a college course or pursuing individual summer study. Although students are encouraged to participate in summer enrichment programs (such as immersion camps, exchange programs, and intensive summer study programs) in order to enhance their knowledge and skills, neither high school credit nor acceleration is granted for these experiences alone. Students who wish to receive credit for study of a language not offered at George Mason High School may enroll in a college course (at Northern Virginia Community College, for example). They will receive one high school credit for successful completion of a 5 credithour college course, and ½ credit for a 3 credit-hour course. Students should see their counselor well in advance in order to complete necessary dual enrollment procedures. Students whose native language is not English may qualify to receive two years of credit by taking a written and oral assessment in their native language. They may find out more about this from their counselor or the Language Acquisition Department Leader.

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  Pathways to complete your language study in Falls Church City Public Schools   

Spanish  Grade 6 Introduction  to Chinese, French,  Spanish

Grade 7 Spanish 1A

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Spanish IB

Spanish 2

Spanish 3*

Grade 8

Grade 9 

Grade 10 

Spanish 3

Spanish 4*

Grade 6 Introduction to  Chinese, French, Spanish

Spanish 1

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Spanish 1A

Spanish 1B

Spanish 2

Spanish 3

Grade 6 Introduction to  Chinese, French, Spanish

Spanish 2

Grade 7 Spanish 1

Grade 8

Spanish 4  or  IBSL 1

Grade 11 Spanish 5 or   IBSL 1

Grade 12  Spanish 5 or  IBSL 2

Grade 12 Spanish 6 or  IBSL 2

Grade 10 

Grade 11

Grade 12 

Spanish 4 or  Spanish 4AP

Spanish 5 or 

Spanish 6 or  IBSL2 or IBHL 2

Grade 9 

Spanish 2

Grade 11

IBSL 2* or IBHL1

Grade 10

Spanish 3 

Spanish 4AP

Grade 11 Spanish IBSL 2 or Spanish 5 *

French  Grade 6 Introduction to  Chinese, French, Spanish

Grade 6 Introduction to  Chinese, French, Spanish

Grade 7 French 1A

Grade 7  French1

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

French IB

French 2

French 3*

Grade 8 French 2

Grade 9 

Grade 10

French 3

French 4*

Grade 11

Grade 12  

French 4 * or  IBSL 1 or IBHL 1

French 5 or IBSL 2 or IBHL 2

Grade 11 

Grade 12 

French 5* or   IBSL 1 or IBHL 1

French 6 or IBSL 2 or IBHL 2

Chinese  Grade 6 Introduction to  Chinese, French, Spanish

Grade 7 Chinese 1A

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Chinese  1B

Chinese  2

Chinese 3*

Grade 11 Chinese  4 * or  IBSL 1 or IBHL 1

Grade 12  Chinese 5 or IB SL 2  or IBHL 2

*Some students finish language study here.

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FRENCH 511007 FRENCH I There is a balanced approach to acquisition of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. French is heard and spoken immediately. Basic vocabulary and structures are learned and applied to functional conversational contexts. Supplementary vocabulary and cultural material are introduced by means of short texts, videos, and authentic online resources. The emphasis is on developing oral proficiency in real-life contexts. 512007 FRENCH II Prerequisite: French I Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in French I By use of the balanced skills approach, the student’s mastery of the language is further developed at this level. More complex language structures and a wider range of vocabulary and idioms are acquired through conversational activities, readings, and a variety of short listening and writing tasks. Cultural awareness and knowledge are further developed through authentic readings, videos, and online resources. The major goal of the course is to continue to develop oral proficiency in real-life contexts, while beginning to develop personal expression in writing and comprehension of a variety of authentic written and spoken material. 513007 FRENCH III Prerequisite: French II Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in French II This intermediate French course further develops the four skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on spontaneous expression and creative use of the language in a wide variety of contexts. Effective spoken and written communication and further development of reading/listening comprehension are major objectives of the course. Students will be introduced to unedited literary texts in textbook and supplementary readings. A variety of themes will include contemporary culture of France and cultures of Frenchspeaking countries. Movies, videos and authentic online resources enrich the classroom experience.

IB FRENCH & FRENCH IV 514007 FRENCH IV 514055 IB FRENCH B SL I / IV 514056 IB FRENCH B HL I / IV Prerequisite: French III Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in French III This fourth-level course fosters further development of the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with increased emphasis on the latter. Articles from newspapers, magazines and the Internet, as well as literary texts, video, and audio materials will provide the basis for comprehension activities, writing tasks, and speaking practice. Thematic units include a variety of topics such as communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology, as well as literary study. SL and HL courses may be co-seated. Students will be studying the same content, but assignments, assessments, and rubrics are differentiated.

IB FRENCH & FRENCH V/VI 515007 FRENCH V 515055 IB FRENCH B SL I / V 515095 IB FRENCH B SL II / V 515056 IB FRENCH B HL I / V 515096 IB FRENCH B HL II / V 516096 IB FRENCH B HL II / VI 518096 IB FRENCH B HL II/VII Prerequisite: French IV Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in French IV This is an advanced level course in which students continue to perfect their communicative skills and enrich their vocabulary through the reading of literature and articles, discussions and other oral activities, viewing films and videos, and listening activities designed to enable students to comprehend sophisticated native oral input. Thematic units include a variety of topics such as communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology, as well as literary study. SL and HL courses may be co-seated. Students will be studying the same content, but assignments, assessments, and rubrics are differentiated.

SPANISH 551007 SPANISH I There is a balanced approach to acquisition of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Spanish is heard and spoken immediately. Basic vocabulary and structures are learned and applied to functional conversational contexts. Supplementary vocabulary and cultural materials are introduced by means of short texts, videos, and authentic online resources. The emphasis is on developing oral proficiency in real-life contexts. 552007 SPANISH II Prerequisite: Spanish I Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Spanish I By use of the balanced skills approach, the student’s mastery of the language is further developed at this level. More complex language structure and a wider range of vocabulary and idioms are acquired through conversational activities, readings, and a variety of short listening and writing tasks. Cultural awareness and knowledge are further developed through authentic readings, online resources, and videos. The major goal of the course is to continue to develop oral proficiency in real-life contexts, while beginning to develop personal expression in writing and comprehension of a variety of authentic written and spoken material. 553007 SPANISH III Prerequisite: Spanish II Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Spanish II This intermediate Spanish course further develops the four skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on spontaneous expression and creative use of the language in a wide variety of contexts. Effective spoken and written communication and development of reading/listening comprehension are major objectives of the course. Students will be introduced to unedited literary texts in 57

textbook and supplementary readings. A variety of themes will include modern Spanish life and cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Movies, videos and authentic online resources enrich the classroom experience. 554054 AP SPANISH IV Prerequisite: Spanish III Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Spanish III This option is offered to students who have attained a high level of proficiency in Spanish prior to the 11th grade. The primary goal of the AP Spanish Language course is to provide students opportunities to refine their skills in speaking, understanding, writing, and reading Spanish and to integrate the use of these skills. Students enrolled in AP Spanish will complete a variety of activities and assessments that will prepare them for the rigor and the format of the Advanced Placement Spanish Language examination, which they will take during the month of May.

IB SPANISH & SPANISH IV 554007 SPANISH IV 554055 IB SPANISH B SL I / IV 554056 IB SPANISH B HL I / IV Prerequisite: Spanish III Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Spanish III This fourth-level course fosters further development of the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with increased emphasis on the latter. Articles from newspapers, magazines and the Internet, as well as literary texts, video, and audio materials will provide the basis for comprehension activities, writing tasks, and speaking practice. Thematic units include a variety of topics such as communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology, as well as literary study. SL and HL courses may be co-seated. Students will be studying the same content, but assignments, assessments, and rubrics are differentiated. HL students are assigned additional literary readings.

IB SPANISH & SPANISH V/VI 555007 SPANISH V 555055 IB SPANISH B SL I / V 555095 IB SPANISH B SL II / V 555056 IB SPANISH B HL I / V 555096 IB SPANISH B HL II / V 556096 IB SPANISH B HL II / VI Prerequisite: Spanish IV Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Spanish IV This is an advanced level course in which students continue to perfect their communicative skills and enrich their vocabulary through the reading of literature and articles, discussions and other oral activities, viewing films and videos, and listening activities designed to enable students to comprehend sophisticated native oral input. Thematic units include a variety of topics such as communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology, as well as literary study. SL and HL courses may be co-seated. Students will be studying the same content, but assignments, assessments, and rubrics are

differentiated. HL students are assigned additional literary readings. 556507 SPANISH FOR FLUENT SPEAKERS Grades 9-10 Recommended: Proficiency evaluation by Spanish teacher In this course fluent Spanish speakers in grades 9-10 will have the opportunity to focus on strengthening their basic reading and writing skills in their native language, while developing their speaking and listening skills in an appropriate manner. Students will listen to and read various authentic materials representing Hispanic cultures and various dialects of their native language. Topics will include current events, everyday activities, and other areas of study and personal interest. Students will also learn additional vocabulary and structures to strengthen their speaking and writing skills in Spanish. Students will improve their vocabulary and reading skills by studying word roots, syllables, prefixes and suffixes, and other word structures. Various authentic materials related to Hispanic culture, current events, and unit themes will be used to support higher level reading skill acquisition. Correct grammar structure and spelling will be an important focus, with an emphasis on developing accurate and more complex written expression. This course will grant one credit toward fulfillment of the Advanced Studies Diploma foreign language requirements (three years of one language or two years each of two languages). An alternate-year curriculum will be written so that students can take the course in consecutive years and be prepared to take IB Spanish in grades 11 and 12.

Mandarin Chinese MANDARIN CHINESE 581007 MANDARIN CHINESE I In this course students will be introduced to Chinese language and culture. The objectives are for students to acquire basic proficiency in the skills of speaking and listening comprehension in the context of contemporary Chinese culture. Chinese characters will be introduced systematically as they relate to the oral/aural skills being acquired during the course. Topics will include greetings, family members, nationality, relationships, school, and food. Foundation units will cover Chinese history and culture that is integrated into the language development process. 582007 MANDARIN CHINESE II Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Mandarin Chinese I In this course students will build on their basic proficiency in the skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese in a proficiency-based context, with continued focus on interactive oral communication and increased emphasis on developing reading and writing skills. The course will continue to focus on correct pronunciation, pinyin, the Chinese character writing system, calligraphic techniques, and sentence composition. Students will acquire sufficient knowledge of Chinese characters to understand simple authentic readings and to write paragraphs on basic topics. Topics will include weather, seasons, calendar, shopping, health, daily routine, and school 58

life. The study of Chinese history and culture is integrated into the language development process. 583007 MANDARIN CHINESE III Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese II Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Mandarin Chinese II In this course students will continue to develop and refine their proficiency in the skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese in a proficiency-based context, with continued focus on interactive oral communication and increased emphasis on developing reading and writing skills. Students will continue to develop oral communicative skills using more complex language structures. Topics will include household chores and responsibilities, education plans and career choices, teen culture, fashion and clothes, leisure activities, nature and wildlife, ecology, current events, history, holidays and traditions. Classroom activities will integrate culture with the teaching of the language through readings, videos, and other authentic sources that will enable students to deepen their understanding of China and its culture.

IB CHINESE & MANDARIN CHINESE IV 584007 MANDARIN CHINESE IV 585155 IB CHINESE B – MANDARIN SL I / IV Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese III Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Mandarin Chinese III This fourth-level course fosters further development of the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with increased emphasis on the latter. Articles from newspapers, magazines and the Internet, as well as literary texts, video and audio materials will provide the basis for comprehension activities, writing tasks, and speaking practice. Thematic units include a variety of topics such as communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology, as well as literary study.

IB CHINESE & MANDARIN CHINESE V 585007 MANDARIN CHINESE V 585055 IB CHINESE B – MANDARIN SL I / V 585095 IB CHINESE B – MANDARIN SL II / V 585156 IB CHINESE B – MANDARIN HL I 585196 IB CHINESE B – MANDARIN HL II Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese IV Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Mandarin Chinese IV This is an advanced level course in which students continue to perfect their communicative skills and enrich their vocabulary through the reading of literature and articles, discussions and other oral activities, viewing films and videos, and listening activities designed to enable students to comprehend sophisticated native oral input. Thematic units include a variety of topics such as communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology, as well as literary study. SL and HL courses may be co-seated. Students will be studying the same content, but assignments, assessments and rubrics are differentiated. HL students are assigned additional literary readings. 59

Mathematics To earn a Standard Diploma, students must complete three credits in mathematics classes, all of which must be at or above the Algebra I level. Students who wish to earn the Advanced Studies Diploma must complete four credits of mathematics, which must include the Algebra II level or above. To fulfill the Group V requirement for the IB Diploma, students must complete the requirements for IB Mathematics HL, IB Mathematics SL, or IB Mathematical Studies SL. NOTE ON MATH COURSE SELECTIONS: Students anticipating a college major in math, sciences (including pre-med), or engineering are advised to take either IB Mathematics SL, AP Calculus AB or AP Calculus BC. AP Calculus BC may also be taken independently of IB Mathematics HL. NOTE: Graphing calculators are used in all high school mathematics classes, however students will be required to show work and complete problems demonstrating steps used by hand without a calculator. 313007 ALGEBRA I Grades 9-10 Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or its equivalent Recommended: Passing score on the 8th grade math SOL test, a grade of “C” or better in Pre-Algebra This course is the standard algebra course in the college-bound academic sequence. It is a challenging course which stresses the importance of and synthesis of abstract algebraic concepts as well as the connections between algebra and arithmetic, geometry, and statistics. Tables and graphs will be used to interpret algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities and to analyze functions. These algebraic skills and concepts are used as tools to represent and solve practical real-life problems. Technology including computers and graphing calculators will be used to assist in problem solving. At the end of this year, students take the Algebra I SOL test. 341907 ALGEBRA I PART I 315107 ALGEBRA I PART II Grades 9-10 This course is a one-year, double block of Algebra that meets every day in a block schedule class. Students will continue working on fundamental pre-algebra skills as they begin to apply these skills towards problem solving. Students will study algebraic equations, linear functions, and quadratic functions. The importance of abstract algebraic concepts, as well as the connections between algebra and arithmetic, geometry, and probability and statistics will be stressed throughout the course. Tables and graphs will be used to interpret algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities and to analyze functions. These algebraic skills and concepts are used as tools to represent and solve practical real-life problems. Technology including computers and graphing calculators will be used to assist in problem solving. Students will receive one elective credit and one mathematics credit for successful completion of the course. At the end of this year, students take the Algebra I SOL test.

314307 GEOMETRY Grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I This course is the standard high school geometry course in the academic sequence required for college bound students. The course includes both inductive and deductive mathematical reasoning as well as emphasis on two- and three-dimensional reasoning skills, coordinate and transformational geometry. At the end of this year, students take the Geometry SOL test. 314309 HONORS GEOMETRY Grades 9-10 Prerequisite: Algebra I Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Honors Algebra I; or a grade of “A” or better in Algebra I Honors Geometry is the second course in the honors high school math sequence. It is a very challenging course that emphasizes the study of geometric proofs. Inductive and deductive reasoning are included in topics such as transformations, congruence, similarity, and measurement of two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional figures, and an introduction to trigonometry. Connections and extensions are made to algebra throughout the year. Students will be expected to recall these topics and integrate previously learned skills with new concepts. Technology, including computers and graphing calculators, provides an important component of this course. At the end of this year, students take the Geometry SOL test. 313407 ALGEBRA, FUNCTIONS, AND DATA ANALYSIS Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry This course is designed as a bridge between Algebra I and Algebra II, for students who have successfully completed Algebra I Part I and II but have struggled in Algebra I and/or Geometry. Students will study various types of functions and their behaviors, probability and statistics, and data analysis using practical applications arising from science, business, and finance. The course will be project-based, utilizing graphing calculator and computer software to enable students to strengthen conceptual understandings in mathematics and develop connections between algebra and statistics. Successful completion of this course should prepare the student to take Algebra II. 60

313507 ALGEBRA II Grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in the second semester of Algebra I. Students must have passed the Algebra I SOL. This course is an extension of the Algebra I curriculum covering topics that were first introduced in Algebra I will be built upon and applied to problems that require higher-order thinking skills. Additional topics introduced in this course include the study of functions, polynomials, rational expressions, complex numbers, and sequences and series. Algebra II builds a foundation of mathematics for those students going on to Pre-Calculus and/or students who are college bound. Along with many colleges, a majority of careers require a successful completion of an Algebra II course. At the end of this year, students take the Algebra II SOL test. 313709 HONORS ALGEBRA II/ TRIGONOMETRY Grades 9-11 Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in both Honors Geometry and Honors Algebra I, passing scores on both the Algebra I and Geometry SOL This course is designed for advanced students who desire a more rigorous course at an accelerated pace. Topics include those in Algebra II as well as a study of trigonometric functions, applications, and graphing, as well as solving trigonometric equations and inequalities. At the end of this year, students take the Algebra II SOL test. 316209 HONORS PRECALCULUS Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra II Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Honors Algebra II/Trig This course prepares students for IB Mathematics SL, AP Calculus AB/BC and/or IB Mathematics HL. This course follows Honors Algebra II/Trig in the honors sequence. Students entering this course have already studied concepts of trigonometric functions including graphing, the unit circle, solutions to oblique triangles, and trigonometric identity proofs. The course expands upon these fundamentals and covers topics from college algebra, analytic geometry and introductory calculus. Technology is used to enrich and expand upon various topics. The course provides a solid background for students who plan to take calculus and other higher level math courses. 319655 IB MATHEMATICAL STUDIES SL Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Algebra II Recommended: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra II IB Mathematical Studies SL is a standard level mathematics course in the IB Diploma Program. Included in the course is a mandatory independent internal assessment project which requires students to utilize mathematical concepts in real-world applications. This course emphasizes writing in mathematics. Topics include sets and logic, geometry and trigonometry,

statistics and probability, functions, financial mathematics, series and sequences, and introductory differential calculus. Students who are taking or have completed either the AP Calculus AB or AP Calculus BC class are not permitted to take this course. 319855 IB MATHEMATICS SL I Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II This is the first part of the more rigorous of the standard level IB mathematics courses. It is designed to cover materials such as college algebra, analytic geometry, trigonometry, and an introduction to advanced probability. Students will be required to complete an internal assessment project, based on individual mathematical exploration, as a requirement for the course. Students completing this course will be prepared for IB Mathematics SL II. At the end of the second year of this course, students will take the IB Mathematics SL exam. 317854 IB MATHEMATICS SL II Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Mathematics SL I This is the second year of the more rigorous of the two standard level IB Mathematics courses. This course covers vectors, logarithms and exponentials, limits, and differential and integral calculus. At the end of the year, students will take the IB Mathematics SL exam. Upon completion of this course, students may sit for the AP exam. 317754 AP Calculus AB/IB MATHEMATICS SL II Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Mathematics SL I This is a rigorous mathematics course that covers limits, differential calculus, and integral calculus. At the end of this course, students will take the AP Calculus AB Exam and may also take the IB Mathematics SL exam. In addition to completing the AP Calculus curriculum, students taking both exams will be expected to complete modules on IB Mathematics SL topics including vectors, logarithms, exponents, and probability/statistics. Upon completion of this course, students will sit for the AP exam and may take the IB exam. 317756 AP CALCULUS BC/IB MATHEMATICS HL I Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Precalculus Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Honors Precalculus This is a fast paced and rigorous mathematics course with emphasis on limits, differential calculus and integral calculus as well as power series, infinite sequences, and parametric, polar, and vector equations. There will be emphasis on theorems and proofs. At the end of the year, students will take the AP Calculus BC Exam.

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319756 IB MATHEMATICS HL II Grade 12 Prerequisite: IB Mathematics HL I Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Honors Precalculus and enrollment in/or successful completion of AP Calculus BC IB Mathematics HL II is a survey course in mathematics that includes selected topics in vectors, trigonometry, linear algebra, probability, statistics, and other topics in preparation for the IB higher-level examination. As part of the IB internal assessment for this course, students will complete an internal assessment. This course must either be taken in conjunction with/or after the successful completion of AP Calculus BC.

319255 AP STATISTICS Grades 10 – 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns 2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study 3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation 4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit, advanced placement or both for a one-semester introductory college statistics course.

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Physical and Health Education Physical and Health Education (formerly “Physical Education, Family Life Education, Health, & Driver Education”) components are required in grades 9 and 10. Driver Education is also a required course in 10th grade. An elective Championship Training course is available for students in grades 9-12 who are interested in more advanced physical training. 730007 PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH/FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION Grade 9 The 9th grade Physical Education/Health/Family Life Education program includes three quarters of Physical Education and one quarter of Health with an FLE component. The emphasis in the 9th grade Physical Education program is the refinement of established skills/team strategies in selected activities and a focus on the principles of lifetime fitness. Activity units lasting approximately two weeks may include the following: Basketball Archery Badminton Fitness Flag Football Floor Hockey Track and Field Weight-Training

Ultimate Frisbee Indoor Games Outdoor Games Softball Soccer Tennis Volleyball

The Health section focuses on issues associated with adolescent growth and development, reproduction, and peer relationships. These issues are discussed, especially those involving dating, alcohol, pregnancy prevention and disease control, and adolescent pregnancy. Students will be assigned a research project that will include a research paper, presentation and visual aid. The FLE component of the Health section includes topics surrounding sexuality and health issues that relate to adolescence. Parents have the option of removing their children from any or all portions of the FLE component of the Health section. Note: There may be an opportunity for some 9th graders to take this course at a nontraditional time. If interested you must meet with your counselor! 740007 PHYSICAL EDUCATION, DRIVER EDUCATION AND HEALTH/FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION Grade 10 The 10th grade Physical Education/Driver Education/Health/FLE program includes one semester of Physical Education, one quarter of Driver Education, and one quarter of Health with an FLE component. The emphasis of the Physical Education program in the 10th grade is the development of selected team strategies and activities with a focus on the importance of lifetime fitness. Activity units of approximately two weeks may include the following: Badminton Outdoor Games Basketball Flag Football Indoor Games

Floor Hockey Track and Field Soccer Volleyball Golf

Tennis Ultimate Frisbee Fitness

Weight Training Softball

The 10th grade quarter of Driver Education follows the state guidelines for the classroom portion of the Virginia State Driver Education program. Successful completion of this course is required in order for a student to obtain a DEC-1 certificate. The DEC-1 certificate is required for enrollment in an in-car driver education program. Students that fail to meet the state’s requirements of 36 class periods or 18 blocks will be given the opportunity to remain in the course provided that they are in good standing with the instructor/school in order to earn credit for the course but will not be able to obtain a DEC-1 certificate. There is a State required 90-minute presentation that the Parent/Guardian/Student must attend before the student receives the DEC-1. The Health section looks at human growth and development through the life cycle using Erik Erikson’s 8 Stages of Human Development. The first stage starts with Infancy and continues through Advanced Age with an emphasis on the issues surrounding Adolescence. Students will be assigned a Research Project that will include a research paper, oral presentation and visual aid based on a topic that they select with the instructor’s approval. The FLE component of the Health section includes Sexual Violence, Alcohol Abuse, Eating Disorders and the Stages of the Normal Sexual Life Cycle. Parents have the option of removing their children from any or all portions of the FLE component of the Health section. Note: There may be an opportunity for some 10th graders to take this course at a nontraditional time. If interested you must meet with your counselor! 770007 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Grades 9-12, 1 SEM This course is taught as a separate class or as a special grouping within standard physical education classes. This course is designed to develop specific gross motor and fine motor skills on an individualized basis. Students are only permitted to take this course with parental and teacher approval and a physician’s recommendation. 770033 ADAPTED FLE Grades 9-10, 1 SEM This course is taught when needed as a separate FLE course for students with special needs. It is taught in a small group format and is an adapted version of the regular FLE program. Students are eligible to take this course as a substitute for 9th and /or 10th grade FLE as indicated in their individual education plans. 63

Sciences The science department suggests that all students take four science courses from the courses described in this book, including studies in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physics and any of the International Baccalaureate science offerings. It is suggested that students and parents consult the student’s counselor and the IB coordinator to plan a four-year sequence that is best suited for each individual. To earn a Virginia Standard Diploma, students must have a minimum of three science credits from two different disciplines, including one verified science credit. To earn a Virginia Advanced Studies Diploma, students must have a minimum of four science credits from three different disciplines, including two verified credits. Students may take two science courses concurrently during their sophomore, junior or senior years. Students who are on track to receive the IB Diploma are exempt from the different discipline requirements. These students may earn a Virginia Advanced Studies Diploma with four years of science from two different disciplines, but must still earn two verified credits. However, it is our recommendation that, except in unusual circumstances, students complete science courses in three different disciplines during their four years of high school. Students are recommended to double up in science sometime during the 10th, 11th, or 12th grade years if they plan to take IB Higher Level science without pursuing the IB Diploma. If this is done in the 10th or 11th grade years, additional science courses become available as options for the student. For example: a student taking both Honors Chemistry and Physics in the 10th grade year will have all courses listed in the 11th and 12th grade years as options.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 431007 BIOLOGY Grades 9-12 This course for the college-bound student is a rigorous, molecular-based study of modern and traditional biological science. Concepts and principles of biology applicable to all life are presented to emphasize that all living systems are similar and related. Laboratory skills are developed to reinforce the understanding of biological concepts and processes. Units of study include: life and cells, genetics, evolution, ecology, human structure and function, classification – monerans, protists, fungi, plants and animals. At the end of the year, students take the Biology SOL test. Dissection is a part of this course. An alternative to dissection is available for any student who requests one. 431009 HONORS BIOLOGY Grades 9-11 Recommended: A grade of "B" or better in previous science course This is a course for the college-bound student interested in an increased challenge in the Biology I course, as well as any student planning to take any IB science in the junior or senior year. The course is SOL based with more in-depth coverage for each topic than that offered in the standard Biology I course. More extensive reading and writing will be emphasized. Laboratory skills will be developed to reinforce the understanding of biological concepts and processes. This course will also introduce students to the IB lab format and grading standards. Topics covered will include: the chemistry of biology, cells, genetics, evolution, classification, human anatomy and physiology, and ecology. At the end of the year, students take the Biology SOL test. Dissection is a part of this course. An alternative to dissection is available for any student who requests one.

434087 BIOLOGY II: ECOLOGY Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Biology This college preparatory laboratory science course in Biology builds on concepts learned in Biology I and provides an in-depth examination of ecological principles and interactions. The aim of this course is to help students integrate information from biology, chemistry, and physics topics to help them understand the environment and make sound decisions regarding management of natural resources. Students will carry out laboratory activities, collect, analyze, and interpret data to learn about the diverse and unique characteristics of ecosystems, use and interpret basic statistics, and understand the multifaceted nature of environmental problems. Dissection is a part of this course. An alternative to dissection is available for any student who requests one. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit. 438056 IB BIOLOGY HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry I This course provides for a more in-depth approach to biological principles and processes than an Honors Biology course. It requires extensive reading and writing; laboratory experiences with a heavier emphasis on experimental design, data collection, statistical analysis of data, and drawing conclusions. College level texts and laboratory work are coupled with extensive review and enrichment of basic biology. This course is designed to provide the student with the first year of biological education in their 2-year sequence. Units of study in this first year will include: cell biochemistry and biology, cell energetics, cell division, molecular genetics, Mendelian genetics, genetic engineering, evolution and diversity. This course begins to prepare the student to take the IB Biology HL exam the end of year two. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB Course.

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438096 IB BIOLOGY HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Prerequisite: IB Biology HL I This course in Biology continues in an in-depth approach to biological principles and processes through extensive reading, writing, and laboratory experiences begun in the first year. Units of study in the second year will include diversity, plant form and function, animal form and function, ecology. Dissection is a part of this course. An alternative to dissection is available for any student who requests one. This course prepares students for the IB Biology Higher Level Examination which fulfills the Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) requirement. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB course.

science with that of a social science. By conducting and evaluating scientific, ethical, and socio-political research, students make connections between the environment and the significance of their choices, as well as those decisions made for them. The second year of the course allows for the skills acquired during the first year to be applied to environmental issues such as biodiversity, conservation, water and soil as resources, and climate change. This course prepares students for the IB Environmental Systems & Societies SL exam, which fulfills either a Group 3 (individual and societies), Group 4 (experimental sciences), or Group 6 (second experimental science) requirement. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB Course.

428055 IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES SL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Prerequisite: Biology Recommended: Successful completion of Chemistry I or Honors Chemistry The intent of IB Environmental Systems & Societies is to investigate the interrelationships between ecological systems and societies in order for students to adopt an informed, personal response to a wide range of environmental problems. As an interdisciplinary subject, this course is designed to incorporate the techniques and knowledge of an experimental science with that of a social science. By conducting and evaluating scientific, ethical, and socio-political research, students make connections between the environment and the significance of their choices, as well as those decisions made for them. Year one of the course serves as an introduction to the ‘systems’ framework of environmental science. Through scientific investigation and selected environmental literature on the subjects of systems, models, ecosystems, sustainability, and resource use, students develop the knowledge needed to determine their own environmental value system. Students pursuing the IB Diploma may choose this course for either a Group 3 (individual and societies), Group 4 (experimental sciences), or Group 6 (second experimental science) credit. This course does not provide a verified unit of science credit, although it does count as a third science discipline. This course begins to prepare students to take the IB Environmental Systems & Societies SL exam at the end of year two. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB Course.

CHEMISTRY

428056 IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES SL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Prerequisite: IB Environmental Systems SL I The intent of IB Environmental Systems & Societies is to investigate the interrelationships between ecological systems and societies in order for students to adopt an informed, personal response to a wide range of environmental problems. As an interdisciplinary subject, this course is designed to incorporate the techniques and knowledge of an experimental

441007 CHEMISTRY I Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I or Biology This course is for the college-bound student and is a rigorous study of chemical principles. Atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical equations, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions and reaction processes are some specific areas of study. An introduction to nuclear chemistry and quantum effects is explored very basically. Families of elements are studied from the standpoint of the relationship between the structure and properties of substances. The approach is both mathematical as well as conceptual. Laboratory skills will be developed to reinforce the understanding of chemical concepts and principles. At the end of the year students take the Chemistry I SOL test. 441009 HONORS CHEMISTRY Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I This is a course for the college-bound student interested in an increased challenge in the Chemistry I course as well as any student planning to take IB Chemistry or Biology in the junior or senior year. The course is SOL based with more in-depth coverage for each topic than that offered in the standard Chemistry I course. More extensive reading and mathematical manipulations will be emphasized. Laboratory skills will be developed to reinforce the understanding of chemical concepts and principles. This course will continue to reinforce the IB lab format and grading standards introduced in Honors Biology. Applications of chemistry and careers will be discussed. At the end of the year, students take the Chemistry I SOL test. This course is recommended for any student who expects to take Chemistry in college. 442007 CHEMISTRY II: FORENSICS Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Chemistry I Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in Chemistry I or a grade of “C” or better in Honors Chemistry This course focuses on how scientific concepts apply to real world situations. The course requires students to recall their 65

knowledge of basic chemistry concepts as the first quarter begins with rigorous course work and laboratory work in the area of organic chemistry. This information will then be applied to drug chemistry and toxicology during the second quarter. The second semester focuses specifically on forensic investigations. Topics of study will include the history of forensic science and major forensic disciplines such as fingerprinting, questioned documents, entomology, anthropology, trace evidence, pathology, etc., as well as law and ethics and current legal issues affecting the field of forensic science. After learning basic concepts, student will apply their knowledge to the investigation of simulated crime scenes and participate in mock trials. This course focuses on problem solving, with an emphasis on writing, using experimentation, theorization, research, synthesis of information and making evidence-based conclusions. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit.

441096 IB CHEMISTRY HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Prerequisite: IB Chemistry HL I This is the second year of a two-year Higher Level IB Chemistry course. This course uses college level texts and laboratory experiences and includes a detailed approach to the principles of chemistry. The course covers similar topics to those studied in the first year but at a deeper level, often requiring more mathematical manipulations. This course prepares students for the IB Chemistry Higher Level Examination which fulfills the Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) requirement. Units of study include atomic structure, bonding, periodicity, energy, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction, and organic chemistry. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB Course.

441055 IB CHEMISTRY SL Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Chemistry I and Algebra II Recommended: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry, a grade of “B” or better in all previous high school science courses and a grade of “B” or better in Algebra II This course provides for an in-depth approach to chemical principles through more extensive reading, writing, laboratory experiences with heavier emphasis on laboratory experimental design and documentation than Chemistry I, and more complex problem solving. College level texts and laboratory work are coupled with extensive review and enrichment of basic chemistry principles. The course content is identical to that of the IB Chemistry HL I first year course and the two classes may be taught concurrently. The scope of this course includes atomic structure, balancing equations, and extends through acid/base chemistry and organic chemistry. This course prepares students for the IB Chemistry Standard Level Examination which fulfills the Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) requirement. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB Course.

EARTH SCIENCES

441056 IB CHEMISTRY HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Prerequisite: Chemistry I Corequisite: Algebra II Recommended: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry, a grade of “B” or better in all previous high school science courses and a grade of “B” or better in Algebra II This course provides for an in-depth approach to chemical principles through more extensive reading, writing, laboratory experiences with heavier emphasis on laboratory experimental design and documentation than Chemistry I, and more complex problem solving. College level texts and laboratory work are coupled with extensive review and enrichment of basic chemistry principles. The course content is identical to that of the IB Chemistry SL course and the two classes may be taught concurrently. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB Course.

421007 EARTH SCIENCE Grades 9-10 Earth Science is the study of the physical properties and laws that govern the composition, structure, and behavior of earth systems. It is a survey course that covers the basics of meteorology, geology, oceanography, and astronomy. The course standards stress the interpretation of maps, charts, tables, and profiles; the use of technology to collect, analyze, and report data; and the application of science skills in systematic investigation. Problem solving and decision making are an integral part of the standards, especially as they relate to the costs and benefits of utilizing the Earth’s resources. Major topics of study include plate tectonics, the rock cycle, Earth’s history, the oceans, the atmosphere, weather and climate, the solar system, and origins of the universe. At the end of the year students take the VA Earth Science SOL exam. 426073 EARTH SCIENCE II ASTRONOMY Grades 11-12 Recommended: Successful completion of Chemistry I or Honors Chemistry Earth & Space Systems integrates content from astronomy, geology, oceanography, and meteorology with various forms of technology, social and environmental issues, and hands-on experiments. Students will explore concepts using computers, telecommunications equipment, probeware, and image processing software. This course provides the opportunity to understand the relationships between the structure, processes, and resources of the earth and other celestial bodies. Major topics of study include: Origins of the Universe, the Solar System, Earth's History and Plate Tectonics, Oceans and Heat Distribution, and Global Weather/Climate Patterns.

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PHYSICS 451007 PHYSICS Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: One laboratory science course Pre or Corequisite: Algebra II Recommended: Successful completion of Chemistry I, a grade of “C” or better in Algebra I Physics I is presented as a continuing process by which one seeks to understand the physical world and not a mere body of its facts. Physics is a single subject of study in which time, space, and matter cannot be separated. Light, mechanics, electricity, magnetism and structure of the atom are studied with emphasis on careers and their impact on society. The course puts an emphasis on daily lab work and rigorous problem solving involving Algebra and Trigonometry. Units of study include: kinematics and dynamics, heat and sound, electricity and magnetism, and light and nuclear physics. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit (SOL) for Virginia. 470106 PHYSICS DUAL ENROLLMENT Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Meet NOVA’s enrollment requirement Recommended: Successful completion of Chemistry I, a grade of “C” or better in Algebra, co-enrollment in Algebra II or higher. Dual Enrollment Physics is presented as a continuing process by which one seeks to understand the physical world and not a mere body of its facts. Physics is a single subject of study in which time, space, and matter cannot be separated. Mechanics, heat, light, electricity, magnetism and structure of the atom are studied with a focus on careers and their impact on society. The course puts an emphasis on scientific writing, lab work and rigorous problem solving involving Algebra and Trigonometry. Units of study include: kinematics and dynamics, heat and sound, electricity and magnetism, and light and nuclear physics. Each semester will also include one major research project/paper. This course provides 8 credits of lab science through NOVA but does not provide a verified unit of credit (SOL) for Virginia. 451055 IB PHYSICS SL Grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Physics I or IB Physics Prep course and Algebra II Corequisite: Precalculus Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in all previous science courses and Algebra II The aim of this course is to develop the student’s ability to use mathematical skills to provide solutions to physical phenomena. The students should be able to reason through the sequential steps of physical phenomena, perform experiments and report observations logically. Units of study for the course include the following: measurement, mechanics, thermal physics and properties of matter, waves, electricity and magnetism, atomic, astrophysics and nuclear physics. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit (SOL) for Virginia.

451056 IB PHYSICS HL I Grade 11 First year of a two-year program Prerequisite: Physics I or IB Physics Prep course and Algebra II Corequisite: Precalculus Recommended: A grade of “B” or better in all previous science courses and Algebra II The aim of this course is to develop abilities to use mathematical skills to provide solutions to physical phenomena. The students should be able to reason through the sequential steps of physical phenomena, perform experiments and report observations logically. Units of study for the first year course include the following: measurement, mechanics, thermal physics and properties of matter, waves, electricity and magnetism, atomic, nuclear physics and astrophysics. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit. Students enrolled in this course will take the IB Physics SL exam at the end of the year. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB Course. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit (SOL) for Virginia. 451096 IB PHYSICS HL II Grade 12 Second year of a two-year program Prerequisite: IB Physics HL I Recommended: A grade of “C-” or better in IB Physics HL I This course uses college level texts and laboratory experiences and includes a detailed approach to the principles of physics. The course amplifies the material taught in the first year of the course with a greater emphasis on problem solving skills involving more advanced mathematical methods. This course prepares students for the IB Physics HL II Higher Level Examination which fulfills the Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) requirement. Units of study include measurement, mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics and digital technology. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit. Students must complete the practical scheme of work each quarter to remain in an IB course. This course does not provide a verified unit of credit (SOL) for Virginia.

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Special Education These courses are available to students who have been found eligible to receive Special Education services. 789683 LIFESKILLS This course is designed primarily for students with moderate to severe disabilities and focuses on vocational training, career awareness, and functional academics. 783533 INDIVIDUALIZED ENGLISH Grades 9-12 Elective This course exposes students to a wide variety of language arts experiences guided by IEP objectives. Objectives may include vocabulary development, literature appreciation and comprehension, practical and formal written and oral communication skills, application of correct English usage and mechanics, and consumer information. Meeting the requirements of this course will qualify as an elective credit, not as a verified English credit. 151533 READING AND WRITING SKILLS Grade 11 Elective This is a full year course that provides skill development and remediation of reading and writing skills and the English content needed to pass the EOC English Reading and Writing SOL tests given in the eleventh grade. These verified credits are a required component to earn a Standard Diploma. This course can be taken as a supplement to the English 11 course. It will address the standards of learning required to pass the EOC English SOLs. Instruction will be based on student need and ongoing assessment. 783633 INDIVIDUALIZED MATH Grades 9-12 Elective Focus will be on individualized instruction with emphasis, on practical, everyday math skills, including computation, measurement, consumer math, and basic algebraic concepts. This elective course does not qualify a student for a verified math credit. 319933 MATH SKILLS Grades 10 Elective This is a one year course for which students can earn elective credit for a passing grade. The objective of this course is to identify areas in the Algebra I/Geometry curriculum that need to be strengthened for each student, and provide additional targeted instruction so that they can be successful in their math class and on the Algebra I or Geometry SOL. Students will use a variety of technology and online resources in addition to teacher support to build their knowledge and skills. 312033 PERSONAL LIVING AND FINANCES Grades 9-12 This course extends the student’s knowledge of basic personal finance through the study of taxes, budgeting, managing debt,

savings, and consumer rights and responsibilities. A strong emphasis is placed on making connections to real-world data and applications. It will prepare students for the workplace readiness skills assessment. Calculator and computer technologies will be used as tools wherever appropriate. It will count as an elective credit, meeting the Economics and Personal Finance graduation requirement (class of 2017 and beyond). 908583 EDUCATION FOR EMPLOYMENT I CLASS Grades 11-12 Elective This career education course is designed for 11th and 12th graders who are interested in understanding more about the academic, daily living, personal-social, and occupational knowledge and skills necessary for the 21st century workplace. Field trips and guest speakers will augment classroom lessons. Students will receive assistance in identifying and meeting their goals related to transitioning to post-secondary life. 907883 EDUCATION FOR EMPLOYMENT I WORK Grades 11-12 Elective Students enrolled in the classroom portion of EFE I have the option to receive an additional elective credit for voluntary or paid employment. Students must complete a minimum of 10 hours per week throughout each semester. Employment will be monitored by GMHS Special Education staff and consist of onthe-job site visits, supervisor interviews, and student feedback. 770007 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Grades 9-12, 1 Semester This course is taught as a separate class or as a special grouping within standard physical education classes. This course is designed to develop specific gross motor and fine motor skills on an individualized basis. Students are only permitted to take this course with parental and teacher approval and a physician’s recommendation. 770033 ADAPTED FLE Grades 9-10, 1 Semester This course is taught when needed as a separate FLE course for students with special needs. It is taught in a small group format and is an adapted version of the regular FLE program. Students are eligible to take this course as a substitute for 9th and /or 10th grade FLE as indicated in their individual education plans. 013303 SUPERVISED STUDY (Non-credit) Grades 9-12 This course is for students receiving special education services. Students will be monitored and assisted by special education department staff in order to complete assignments and study for tests. Students who sign up for this course should be able to work well in an unstructured setting with active supervision. Students will receive ongoing support to address needs in the area of executive functioning. 68

GENERAL ELECTIVE COURSES 984201 Student Aide (Non-credit) Students may elect to be assigned as aides in classes and offices in the school. They enter a contractual agreement with a teacher/supervisor that defines the duties and learning activities. The students must submit a contract with the appropriate signatures. TechSpace Aide (Non-Credit) The TechSpace Student Help Desk Student Aide actively participates in the hands on study of technology integration and support in an educational context. The goal of TechSpace is to leverage student curiosity and creativity for the benefit of the George Mason High School learning community. Students will be required to assess problems throughout the day and define the best approach to addressing or solving the problem. MakerSpace Aide (Non-Credit) The MakerSpace Student Aide actively participates in the hands on study of STEM integration in an educational context. The goal of the MakerSpace Student Aide is to leverage student curiosity and creativity for the benefit of the George Mason High School learning community. Students will be required to maintain and manage the George Mason MakerSpace throughout the day.

ELECTIVES Arlington Career Center Electives All Arlington Career Center courses provide elective credit Arts Electives Art, Band, Choir, Computer Graphics, Contract Band, Drums, Film Studies, Guitar, Photography, Theatre, Wind Ensemble, IB Art, IB Film Studies, IB Music, IB Theatre Career and Technical Education Electives Architectural Drawing, Basic Technical Drawing, AP Computer Science A, Computer Science Principles, Engineering Drawing, Robotics, TV & Media Production, IB Business & Management, IB Computer Science Foreign Language Electives French, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese Interdisciplinary Electives Championship Training, Creative Writing, Economics & Personal Finance, International Relations, Journalism, Math Skills T2, Reading Strategies, Yearbook, IB Business & Management, IB Economics, IB Psychology, IB Social and Cultural Anthropology, IB Theory of Knowledge

985291, 985292 TechSpace Student Help Desk (Non-credit) The TechSpace Student Help Desk course is a hands on study of technology integration and support in an educational context. The goal of TechSpace is to leverage student curiosity and creativity for the benefit of the George Mason High School learning community. Students will be required to assess problems throughout the day and define the best approach to addressing or solving the problem. In addition to solving problems for students and teachers, students will be required to complete and maintain several running projects (blog posts, tutorials, face-to-face trainings and a long term project) that address problems or solutions in educational technology integration. The course also provides students with the opportunity to pursue an independent learning pathway in one of four areas: innovation, design, entrepreneurship or applications and develop a project which positively impacts their community. Students will be able to collaborate with outside businesses and organizations as they develop and implement their projects. 013307 SUPERVISED STUDY (Non-credit) Juniors/Seniors whose supervised study fall in the beginning and/or ending blocks may request Early Release/Late Arrival. This request may be made once the schedule shows that such an arrangement is possible without a change in classes. Seniors who wish to obtain Senior Study privileges must sign up for supervised study and request Senior Study at the beginning of the year. This is subject to administrative approval and available to students who remain in good standing behaviorally and academically. 69

Arlington Career Center

ARLINGTON CAREER CENTER As part of the Career and Technical Education program, the following courses are offered at the Arlington Career Center. Students should see their counselor for a detailed description, prerequisites, and other information concerning these offerings. When scheduling, students need to keep in mind that ACC courses meet a full block EVERY DAY, so students are limited to five other course selections. This is a very serious commitment to a selected program sequence. Scheduling must be planned very carefully in order to meet the course requirements as well as all other graduation criteria. Bus transportation is provided to and from the Arlington Career Center for their morning, midday and afternoon sessions. All tenth and eleventh grade students are expected to ride the bus. Twelfth grade students who receive parental permission may drive themselves or ride with another twelfth grade student. Students who drive must comply with all GMHS driving and parking regulations. Current ninth, tenth, or eleventh grade students who want to enroll in a class at the Arlington Career Center for the first time during the 2017-2018 school year must complete the following steps for approval: 1. Visit the Arlington Career Center to observe the career opportunities available to you. GMHS will arrange a tour of Arlington Career Center in the spring. Students may also organize their own visit to the Arlington Career Center with their parents. Please see Mr. Clark if you need assistance in making arrangements. 2. Place the Arlington Career Center course title and number on your 2017-18 registration form. 3. Current 9th graders Only: Please see Mr. Clark to discuss your interest in attending the Arlington Career Center. Administrative approval will be necessary.

ARLINGTON CAREER CENTER SKILL PREPARATORY PROGRAMS Note: A credit earned in the following courses will fulfill the Career and Technical/Fine Arts or an elective requirement for graduation. Each Career and Technical course offers the opportunity to earn the career and technical credential required for the Standard Diploma graduation requirement. 791387 Air Force Junior ROTC I 791687 Air Force Junior ROTC II Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Students must be least 14 years of age and comply with USAF grooming standards. The focus of AFJROTC is to develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community. This is accomplished through development of self-discipline, respect, customs & courtesies, character, integrity, service and leadership. Enrollment in AFROTC does not obligate a student to military service. AFJROTC courses include Aviation History, Leadership, Global Studies, Space Exploration, Cadet Health and Wellness, and Management of the Cadet Corps. As a I and II level cadet, students will learn about dynamic followership, teamwork and professionalism and will be assigned to positions in the cadet squadron. 791887 Air Force Junior ROTC III 791987 Air Force Junior ROTC IV Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Completion of AFJROTC I & II, and compliance with USAF grooming standards. The focus of AFJROTC is to develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community. This is accomplished through development of self-discipline, respect, customs & courtesies, character, service, integrity, service and

leadership. Enrollment in AFJROTC does not obligate a student to military service. AFJROTC classes include two Aerospace Science classes: A Journey into Aviation History and Cultural Studies: An Introduction into Global Awareness plus two Leadership Education IV-Principles of Management for classes starting in even numbered academic years. The Leadership Education class also includes basic drill training. For classes starting in odd numbered academic years the AFJROTC classes include two Aerospace Science classes: The Science Flight and Exploration of Space plus two Leadership Education classes: Leadership Education I-- Citizenship, Character & Air Force Tradition and Leadership and Education II-- Communication, Awareness and Leadership. Additionally, every year the course includes a fitness program known as the Cadet Health and Wellness Program (the objective of this fitness program is to motivate cadets to maintain an active lifestyle into their adult lives). The details on the topics covered in each course is available on VA- 821’s web page. Only cadets enrolled in AFJROTC can take these classes. As a level III & IV cadet, students will focus on developing and expanding their leadership skills. They can compete for positions in the corps with increased leadership opportunity. 867787 Auto Collision Repair I Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None In the global automotive repair industry, there is a growing demand for qualified auto body technicians. In this course, students are taught non-structural analysis, damage repair, and welding. Students work with a variety of materials, using metal finishing and body filling techniques to prepare surfaces and repair panels. In addition, students practice shop safety and gain career skills.

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867887 Auto Collision Repair II Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Auto Collision Repair I This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the auto body field. There are two areas of specialization: auto painting and collision work. Although students obtain experience in both, it is possible to specialize in one particular area. The majority of time is spent in practical "hands-on" experience. Certification: Upon successful completion of level II, students can take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE)/Skills USA Automotive Technicians test for paint and refinishing. 850687 Automotive Technology I Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None Automotive Technology I is the beginning course in the Advanced Automotive Technology program sequence at the Career Center. It may also be taken as a general interest course. Students are introduced to career opportunities in the automotive field and how the Automotive Youth Education System (AYES) can help them find employment in an automotive career path. Students will develop competencies in many of the ASE certified areas of automotive technology including brakes and engine repair. Students also will learn how to work with tools and perform vehicle maintenance. The majority of this course is hands-on, and allows students to work on cars, including their own. College Credit: This course may be dual-enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) as AUTO100 for a total of 2 credits at NOVA towards an Automotive Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree pending acceptance to NOVA. The NOVA entrance requirements must be met before registering. The content of this course is taught at the college level. Please consult with your counselor for more details. 850787 Automotive Technology II Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Automotive Technology I Automotive Technology II involves "real world training" in an onthe-job type facility. Training in the most up-to-date technologies enables a student to gain experience in this exciting and fast growing industry. Use of modern specialized equipment with emphasis on "hands-on" training makes this course beneficial to future technicians, as well as automobile owners. This course is a prerequisite for Automotive Technology III. College Credit: This course may be dual-enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) as AUTO265 for a total of 6 credits at NOVA towards an Automotive Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree pending acceptance to NOVA. The NOVA entrance requirements must be met before registering. The content of this course is taught at the college level. Please consult with your counselor for more details.

Certification: ASE/AYES/SkillsUSA Automotive Technician End-of-Program Examinations 850887 Automotive Technology III Full year, two periods, two credits Grade 12 Prerequisite(s): Automotive Technology II Automotive Technology III is the culmination of the three-year sequence in Advanced Automotive Technology. Students continue to build competencies in ASE-certified areas of automotive technology, including specialized areas such as computer controlled systems, fuel injection and front wheel alignment. Use of sophisticated testing devices and other modern equipment prepares students with job skills required for success in the automotive industry. In the spring semester, students can participate in the Career Center’s nationallyrecognized internship program, where students interview for paid internships at local automotive dealerships and independent service facilities. During the summer, most of these internships turn into full-time, paid positions. College Credit: This course may be dual-enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) as AUTO241and AUTO266 for a total of 8 credits at NOVA towards an Automotive Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree pending acceptance to NOVA. The NOVA entrance requirements must be met before registering. The content of this course is taught at the college level. Please consult with your counselor for more details. Certification: ASE/AYES/SkillsUSA Automotive Technician End-of-Program Examinations 848787 Aviation Technology Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Students must be fifteen years old prior to completion of the course. Aviation Technology provides an introduction to the world of aviation and the aerospace industry. It is designed for students who intend to pursue either pilot training or aviation related career fields. This is one of only four courses in the Commonwealth of Virginia in which students get to fly real airplanes. Course content includes careers in aviation and aerospace, aviation history, principles of flight, aircraft systems and performance, meteorology for pilots, interpreting weather data, basic navigation, electronic navigation, aviation physiology, flight planning and decision making. Students receive flight training in full motion and stationary flight simulators and participate in two actual aircraft flights at a local airport. The curriculum is enriched with field trips to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, Reagan National Airport and Lockheed Martin’s Flight Demonstration Center. Certification: Students will take the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aeronautical knowledge written examination for a private pilot license.

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2853187 Barbering I Full year, two credits, two periods Grades 10-11 Prerequisite: None Barbering is the study of hair, scalp, and skin. Student study and prepare in a clinical lab setting, using mannequins and live models for manipulative practice. The program emphasizes safety and sanitation, communication, and management skills. Related areas of study include psychology, ethics, and professional image. Competency completions prepare the student to work or apprentice in a local shop or beauty salon. 846887 Biotechnology Techniques and Applications Full year, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology I This course addresses the principles, techniques and applications of biotechnology. Students will examine biotechnology procedures and protocols while applying them to problems commonly addressed in the major biotech career paths of forensic science, agriculture, medicine, environmental science and genetic engineering. Specific techniques include sterile techniques, micropipetting, bacteria culturing, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), DNA extraction, use of DNA vectors, and protein analysis. This course is recommended for students who like science. Additional high school credit: A credit earned in this course will satisfy the third lab science credit for the standard diploma or the fourth lab science credit for the advanced diploma (Biology II-Genetics 24350). In addition to the science credit, students will receive a second credit for fine/practical arts. This also counts as a sequence for the modified standard diploma.

852787 Cosmetology I Full year, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None Cosmetology I is designed for students interested in becoming licensed cosmetologists. Students learn the science and art of being a professional cosmetologist by investigating the past, analyzing the present and concluding with a total beauty result. Students gain knowledge in the foundations of professional ethics, bacteriology, anatomy/physiology, basic chemistry/electricity, properties of hair and scalp, principles of hair design, shampooing/conditioning, haircutting, hairstyling, facials, manicuring and pedicuring. Instruction is designed to prepare students to meet the qualifications for Cosmetology II (28529). Cosmetology kits are provided for student use, or they may purchase their own (approximate cost $170). Certifications: Virginia State Board of Barbers and Cosmetology Examination (once students have completed both Cosmetology I & II). 852887 Cosmetology II Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Cosmetology I. Students build on Cosmetology I by learning through a scientific approach to the art of cosmetology. Students learn how to braid with extensions, make wigs, permanent waving, chemical hair relaxers, soft curl-perms, theory and application of color, skin care, hair removal, facial makeup, nail care, advanced nail techniques, and the business of cosmetology. As part of their training, students also will work in the lab on clients to gain real salon experience, attend beauty shows, and work with senior citizens at various local community centers. Cosmetology kits are provided for student use, or they may purchase their own (approximate cost $170). Certifications: Virginia State Board of Barbers and Cosmetology Examination (once students have completed both Cosmetology I & II). 827587 Culinary Arts & Sciences I Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Students must submit a chest x-ray or negative TB skin test. In this course, students will begin learning the knowledge, skills, and work habits required for success in the food services industry. Using the Career Center’s commercial kitchen and dining room, students will learn basic safety and sanitation, as well as fundamental cooking techniques such as frying, sautéing and roasting of meats and vegetables. In addition, students will gain an introduction to baking, and an understanding of how to properly prepare rice, pasta, and fresh salads. Students will be exposed to real-life industry scenarios which will assist them in career decision-making.

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827687 Culinary Arts & Sciences II Full year, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Culinary Arts & Sciences I and submission of a chest x-ray or negative TB skin test Culinary Arts & Sciences II presents an intense curriculum designed to prepare students for post-secondary education or entry-level employment in the food service industry. This course focuses on the following: cook-to-order entrées; correct cooking of meats, fish and vegetables; pizza and bread making; business entrepreneurship; and food sciences and nutrition. Students work in a real-world kitchen environment preparing meals for real customers. In addition, advanced baking skills are taught with an emphasis on production costs, profits and loss, scaling formulas, and successfully running a small business. Qualified students may compete in the SkillsUSA competitions, where they can win scholarships and other valuable awards. Culinary Arts and Sciences II covers the fundamental chemistry, mathematics and technologies required of the successful culinarian. Students will practice scaling formulas and recipes; extrapolating service requirements for banquets; as well as varying essential combinations of ingredients (acids, bases, proteins, and fats) to control their effects on the final products. 2665387 CyberSecurity I Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None This introduction to Computer Hardware, Networking, and Security introduces students to the rapidly growing field of CyberSecurity in an environment of global computer networks. Students will discuss CyberEthics; the legal aspects of CyberSecurity; how to identify and analyze CyberSecurity threats; system vulnerabilities and risks; and how to develop system procedures and strategies to prevent potential CyberSecurity attacks. Students will learn to build their own computer networks, analyze them for vulnerabilities, and secure them from attack. 2665787 CyberSecurity II Full Year, X credits Grades Prerequisite(s): This is the second year of a two-year program. This introduction to Computer Hardware, Networking, and Security introduces students to the rapidly growing field of CyberSecurity in an environment of global computer networks. Students will discuss CyberEthics; the legal aspects of CyberSecurity; how to identify and analyze CyberSecurity threats; system vulnerabilities and risks; and how to develop system procedures and strategies to prevent potential CyberSecurity attacks. Students will learn to build their own computer networks, analyze them for vulnerabilities, and secure them from attack.

663087 Digital Animation Full year, one credit Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Graphic Communications System Students gain experiences related to computer animation by using graphics and design concepts. Students solve problems involving 3-D object manipulation, storyboarding, texturing/mapping, lighting concepts, and environmental geometry. Students create a variety of animations that reflect real-world applications and are introduced to interactive and 3D animation software. Production of a portfolio showcasing examples of original student work is included. 828487 Early Childhood Education I Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): A tuberculin skin test and/or a chest x-ray may be required. Early Childhood Education I is designed for students interested in preparing to be early childhood teachers in child care occupations and elementary education. Students receive classroom instruction and practical experience working with infant, toddler, preschool, elementary and special needs children. Students learn basic principles of child growth and development, explore the characteristics of early childhood programs and implementation of early childhood curriculum. 828687 Early Childhood Education II Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Early Childhood Education I, or Child Development & Parenting I/II; also, a tuberculin skin test and/or a chest x-ray may be required This course continues to improve students’ skills in teaching young children. Students become familiar with the full range of occupational opportunities in the Early Childhood Education field and focus on special-needs children. Students implement a variety of Early Childhood curriculum activities through field work placements. College Credit: This course may be dual-enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) as CHD120 and CHD165 for a total of up to 6 credits at NOVA. The NOVA entrance requirements must be met before registering. The content of this course is taught at the college level. Please consult with your counselor for more details. Certifications: Completion of Early Childhood Education I & II will assist students in achieving the Child Development Associate (CDA) National Credential. 853387 Electricity I Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None Electricity I enables students to develop electrical skills in working in residential (home) construction. Students are taught the proper use of common electrical tools, wiring techniques, the building and analyzing of electrical circuits, reading of 74

electrical plans, and electrical problem-solving. Students are introduced to commercial new construction and communication wiring. Instruction is based on the National Electric Code. Most of the instruction is practical and hands-on. Safety and good work habits are emphasized. 853487 Electricity II Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Electricity I Electricity II provides instruction in the wiring methods of commercial construction and communications cabling, including telephone wiring, cable television wiring, BICSI/RBT Systems Copper based Network Cabling and Fiber Optic Network Cabling. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Construction is also offered. Seniors may be eligible for a workstudy program in the electrical supplies distribution field. The commercial wiring is taught to the standards of the National Electrical Code. The network cabling is taught to the BICSI/RBT Systems standard and meets the TIA/EIA 568A standard. Students will study communications wiring standards, wiring methods and techniques, network and cabling history and terminology. Those students who complete all network cabling instruction and meet all state, local, and instructor requirements will have an opportunity to take the exam for the BICSI/RBT certification, which is nationally-recognized by the telecommunications industry. Certifications: OSHA-10 Construction Safety card; BICSI/RBT Systems Copper-based Network Cabling and Fiber Optic Network Cabling Certifications (given in English only). 833387 Emergency Medical Technician/Human Anatomy and Physiology Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology I and students must meet all Virginia Department of Health, Office of Emergency Medical Services regulatory eligibility requirements to attend an EMT program, including: Be at least 16 years of age at the start of the course; have parental permission if under age 18; be proficient in reading, writing, speaking and understanding the English language as determined by Arlington Public Schools. This program is a college-level course taught to the National Highway Transportation Safety Agency/US Department of Transportation 1994 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMTB) National Standard curriculum. This program is ideal for the student interested in the medical field or any career requiring First Aid certification. Students will study anatomy, physiology, introduction to emergency medical care, airway management, patient assessment, medical emergencies, obstetrical/gynecological emergencies, care of the trauma patient, pediatric emergencies, and ambulance operations. Students will also complete the American Heart Association Basic Life Support for the healthcare provider and a first aid course. Students will also be provided the opportunity to assist and observe in a hospital emergency department or ride-along on an emergency ambulance.

Additional high school credit: A credit earned in this course satisfies the third lab science credit for the standard diploma or the fourth lab science credit (Biology II Anatomy/Physiology 24330) for the advanced diploma. Students receive one credit for laboratory science and a second credit for fine/practical arts. College Credit: This course may be dual-enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) as EMS11 and MS120 for a total of up to 8 credits at NOVA. The NOVA entrance requirements must be met before registering. The content of this course is taught at the college level. Please consult with your counselor for more details. This allows a pathway for the student to obtain an AAS degree in EMS with an automatic acceptance to George Washington University’s on-line Bachelors in Health Sciences degree program at reduced tuition. 844187 Engineering I: Intro to Engineering Design/Engineering II Principles of Engineering Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): None Engineering I emphasizes the development of engineering design. Students use computer software to produce, analyze and evaluate models of project solutions. They study the design concepts of form and function, and then state-of-the-art technology to translate conceptual design into reproducible products. Engineering II provides an overview of engineering technology. Students develop problem solving skills by tackling real world engineering problems. Through theory and practical hands on experiences, students address the emerging social and political consequences of technological change. Some of the topics covered will be an overview and perspective of engineering, the design process, communication and documentation, and engineering systems. 849187 Engineering III/IV: Computer Integrated Production/Engineering Development and Implementation Full year, two periods, two credits Grades 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Engineering I and Engineering II (at comprehensive high schools) This course builds upon the computer solid modeling design skills developed in Engineering I: Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Design. Students are presented with design problems that require the use of Autodesk’s Inventor software to develop solutions. They evaluate the solutions, make appropriate modifications and use prototyping equipment to produce three-dimensional models. Students work in teams to design and test a solution. Problems involve a wide range of engineering applications (e.g., a school robo-mascot, an automated solar water heater, and a remote control hovercraft). Students will maintain a journal as part of a portfolio of their work. Each team is responsible for delivering progress reports and making final presentations of their project for an outside review panel. The completed portfolio will be invaluable as students apply to college. (Continued next page)

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Project Lead the Way (PLTW) “Project Lead the Way” is a nationally-recognized sequence of courses for orienting students to engineering and preparing them for success in college engineering programs. Students entering this program of study must be enrolled in a college prep sequence of math and science. The entire sequence of three, year-long courses begins at the comprehensive high schools and culminates at the Career Center with Engineering III/IV. 834487 Forensic Technology with application in Biotechnology Full year, two credits Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology I Forensic Technology with application in Biotechnology is designed for students seriously interested in any of the forensic sciences as a career field, particularly ones involving biotechnology. It is a challenging course because of the amount of college-level material. Students will learn how to process crime scenes, perform DNA analysis, complete refractive index tests on glass samples, analyze blood spatter patterns, and participate in seminars which are designed to discuss case studies. Students will be required to perform standard laboratory protocols, and follow the scientific method in all analyses. Students will learn various techniques used in the different forensic sciences, for example, entomology, osteology, anthropology, forensic botany, toxicology, and DNA analysis. This course is especially recommended for students who have a strong science background. 663087 Graphic Communications System Full year, one credit Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Digital Animation Graphic Communications System focuses on creating computer graphic images for display on the World Wide Web. Students acquire knowledge regarding the difference between Web graphics and print graphics. Through class projects, students create work using a variety of image-making software. By developing quality art images, students learn the highly transferable skills of visual communication. These skills are increasingly in demand in our web-connected world. Students create a professional digital portfolio of completed work. 830287 Health Sciences Full year, one credit Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Medical Terminology (description below) This course introduces the student to a variety of healthcare careers and develops basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. It is designed to help students understand the key elements of the U.S. healthcare system and to learn basic healthcare terminology, anatomy and physiology for each body system, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of traumatic and medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instruction emphasizes safety, cleanliness, asepsis,

professionalism, accountability, and efficiency within the healthcare environment. Students also begin gaining jobseeking skills for entry into the health and medical sciences field. In addition, instruction may include the basics of medical laboratory procedures, pharmacology fundamentals, biotechnology concepts, and communication skills essential for providing quality patient care. 830287 Medical Terminology Full year, one credit Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Health Sciences Medical Terminology is designed to help students learn health care language. Topics are presented in logical order, beginning with each body system's anatomy and physiology and progressing through pathology, diagnostic procedures, therapeutic interventions, and finally pharmacology. Students learn concepts, terms, and abbreviations for each topic. College credit: This course may be dual-enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) as HIM 111 for a total of 3 credits at NOVA. The NOVA entrance requirements must be met before registering. The content of this course is taught at the college level. Please consult with your counselor for more details. 830587 Pharmacy Technician Full year, two credits Grade 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None This certificate program is designed to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge to begin work as a pharmacy technician. The coursework will fulfill the requirements of the Board of Pharmacy and prepare students to take either the state examination or the national examination administered by the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board. Trained, experienced pharmacy technicians who can demonstrate the right skills and knowledge would be able to pursue many exciting and respected career options or postsecondary study in the pharmacy field. Certifications: Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) Examination 836587 Physical Therapy/Sports Medicine Technology Full year, two periods, two credits (Optional: 105 clinical hours for three credits) Grades 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology I and a chest X-ray or tuberculin skin test is required if participating in the optional 3rd credit Clinical Observation. Physical Therapy/Sports Medicine Technology is designed for students interested in all aspects of rehabilitative medicine such as physical therapy, athletic training, exercise physiology, occupational therapy, and sports medicine. It is a very challenging course because of the substantial amount of collegelevel material and competency-based curriculum. Students will study anatomy and physiology, cardiovascular stress testing, therapeutic exercise, body composition, ambulation, effects of ultrasound/ electrical stimulation, hydrotherapy, and 76

goniometry. They become skilled in the evaluation of athletic injuries, initial emergency medical assessment and care, modality application, formation of rehabilitative exercise programs and taping. In addition, students will receive certification in American Red Cross CPR/AED and Standard First Aide for healthcare providers. An integral part of the program is the “hands-on” experience students can gain while assisting and treating patients under the supervision of licensed physical therapists, certified athletic trainers, orthopedic physicians, and exercise physiologists during clinical internships. Additional high school credit: A credit earned in this course will satisfy the third lab science credit for the standard diploma or the fourth lab science credit for the advanced diploma (Biology II-Anatomy and Physiology 24330). 831087 Small Animal Care Full year, one credit Grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Biology I; Concurrent Enrollment in Veterinary Science Students learn how to care for and manage small animals, focusing on instructional areas in animal health, nutrition, management, reproduction, and evaluation. Course content also includes instruction in tools, equipment, and facilities for small animal care, and provides activities to foster leadership development. 808887 Veterinary Assistant I Full year, one credit Grades 9-12 Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Veterinary Assistant II

Additional high school credit: A credit earned in this course will satisfy the third lab science credit for the standard diploma or the fourth lab science credit for the advanced diploma (Biology II-Advanced Survey of Biology Topics 24320). 2806187 Veterinary Science Full year, one credit Grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Biology I; Concurrent enrollment in Small Animal Care I Veterinary Science enables students to acquire the employability and technical knowledge and skills needed to succeed in postsecondary education as well as in a career in veterinary medicine or a related occupation. Course content integrates application of academics, development of career competencies, and instruction in course-specific knowledge and skills, such as the use of tools, equipment, and facilities related to veterinary medicine. Business management, leadership, and FFA-activities are included in the course. Students enrolled in the course should have a strong background in math and science and should be familiar with small animal care. Additional high school credit: A credit earned in this course will satisfy the third lab science credit for the standard diploma or the fourth lab science credit for the advanced diploma (Biology II-Advanced Survey of Biology Topics 24320)).

Students learn animal science and the care of animals, including the fundamentals of companion animal species and breeds, behavior and training, body systems, nutrition, and safety. Students develop basic skills and techniques for assisting the veterinarian/technician in the following areas: handling companion animals and other small mammals, grooming, animals/caring for coats, feeding small mammals, and maintaining equipment and facilities. 2806387 Veterinary Assistant II Full year, once credit Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Biology I; Concurrently enrollment in Veterinary Assistant II Student expand their knowledge of animal science and the care of animals, including animal structure and function, microbes and disease prevention, parasitology, and genetics and breeding. Students develop more advanced skills and techniques for assisting the veterinarian/technician in the following areas: handling large animals and exotic animals, applying aseptic techniques, performing first aid and surgery, performing technical functions, administering medication, handling death and dying, working with wildlife, and performing office functions.

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Revised: 03/01/2017

GMHS POS 2017-2018.pdf

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