Fractional Order Adaptive Compensation for Cogging Effect in PMSM Position Servo Systems ? Ying Luo ∗ , YangQuan Chen ∗∗ , and Hyo-Sung Ahn ∗∗∗ ∗

Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS), Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Utah State University, 4160 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4160, USA. On leave from the Department of Automation Science and Technology in South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, P. R. China. ∗∗ Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS), Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Utah State University, 4160 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4160, USA. ∗∗∗ Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju, Korea.

Abstract: Fractional calculus is a generalization of the integration and differentiation to the fractional (non-integer) order. In this paper, for the first time, we devised a fractionalorder adaptive compensation (FO-AC) method for cogging effect minimization for permanent magnetic synchronous motors (PMSM) position and velocity servo system. Cogging effect is a major disadvantage of PMSM. In our FO-AC scheme, a new fractional order adaptive compensator for cogging effect is designed to guarantee the boundedness of all signals. Stability properties have been proven for the systems with the traditional integer order adaptive compensation method and the proposed fractional order adaptive compensation method, respectively. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the advantage of the proposed FO-AC method for cogging effect compensation over the conventional integer order scheme. Keywords: Fractional calculus, cogging effect, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM), fractional order adaptive control. 1. INTRODUCTION Extending classical integer order calculus to non-integer order case leads to the so-called fractional calculus. It has a firm and long-standing theoretical foundation and the earliest systematic studies of fractional calculus were in the 19th century by Liouville, Riemann and Holmgren (Oldham and Spanier, 1974). In the last several decades, as the rapid development of computer technology and the better understanding of the potential of fractional calculus, the realization of fractional order control system became much easier than before, and the fractional order calculus will be more and more useful in various sciences and engineering areas. In motion control branch, some example applications can be found in (Xue et al., 2006; Monje et al., 2008). The application of the theory of fractional calculus in adaptive control is just beginning, but with more and more research efforts on this subject (Vinagre et al., 2002; Ladaci and Charef, 2006a,b). In this paper, we devised a fractional-order adaptive compensation (FO-AC) method for cogging effect minimization for permanent magnetic synchronous motors (PMSM) position and velocity servo system. Cogging effect is a major disadvantage of PMSM, and degrades the servo control performance of application, especially in a lowspeed range (Xu et al., 2004) (Luo et al., 2008d) (Luo et al., 2008b) (Luo et al., 2008a). In our FO-AC scheme, a new fractional order adaptive compensator for cogging effect is ? Corresponding author: Professor YangQuan Chen. 1(435)7970148; F: 1(435)7973054; E: [email protected]; http://fractionalcalculus.googlepages.com/

T: W:

designed to guarantee the boundedness of all signals. Stability properties have been proven for the system with the traditional integer order adaptive compensation method and the proposed fractional order adaptive compensation method, respectively. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the advantage of the proposed FO-AC method for cogging effect compensation over the conventional integer order scheme. The major contributions of this paper include 1) A new fractional order adaptive compensation scheme for cogging effect minimization; 2) Stability proofs of the system with the traditional integer order adaptive compensation method and the proposed fractional order adaptive compensation scheme in frequency domain; 3) Simulation verification of FO-AC for multi-harmonic cogging effect on the PMSM position servo system simulation model; 4) Demonstration of the advantage of the FO-AC for cogging effect by performing the simulation comparison with the traditional integer order scheme. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. In Sec. 2, a new fractional order adaptive compensator for cogging effect is designed based on frequency domain stability analysis. Simulation test is presented in Sec. 3, and the performances using the fractional order AC are compared with the traditional integer order AC for cogging effect in the simulation. Conclusion is given in Sec. 4.

2. FRACTIONAL ORDER ADAPTIVE COMPENSATION OF COGGING EFFECT 2.1 Motivations and Problem Formulation In this section, a fractional order adaptive compensator for cogging is designed. The cogging force can be written as: −a(θ), where a(θ) is the function of θ, the angular displacement. In this paper, to present our ideas clearly, without loss of generality, The motion control system is modeled as follows ˙ = v(t), θ(t) (1) a(θ) v(t) ˙ =u− − Tl0 − B1 v, (2) J 1 1 B u = Tm , T l 0 = Tl , B 1 = J J J where θ is the angular position; v is the velocity; u is the control input and a(θ) is the unknown position-dependent cogging disturbance which is repeating in every pole-pitch; J is the moment of inertia; Tm is the ideal case of the electromagnetic torque generated, and Tl is the load torque applied; B is the friction coefficient. Remark 2.1. Equations (1) and (2) can be used to describe the mechanical dynamic system of a PMSM in the synchronous rotating reference frame (Luo et al., 2008d). In this paper, we also consider the cogging force as the general multi-harmonic form as considered in (Luo et al., 2008d) ∞ X Ai sin(ωi θ + ϕi ). (3) a(θ) = i=1

where Ai is the unknown amplitude of the i-th harmonics, ωi is the known state-periodic cogging force frequency, and ϕi is the phase angle. From physical consideration, a(θ) should be bounded as |a(θ)| ≤ b0 . (4) First, before presenting our main results, the following definitions are necessary which are adapted from (Ahn et al., 2005) for self-containing purpose. Definition 1. The total passed trajectory is given as: Zt Zt dθ s(t) = | | dτ = |v(τ )| dτ, dτ 0

0

where θ is the angle position, and v is the velocity. Physically, s(t) is the total passed trajectory, hence it has the following property: s(t1 ) ≥ s(t2 ), if t1 ≥ t2 . With notation s(t), the position corresponding to s(t) is denoted as θ(s(t)) and the cogging force corresponding to s(t) is denoted as a(s(t)). In our definition, since s(t) is the summation of absolute position increasing along the time axis, just like t and s(t) is a monotonous growing signal. So we have a(θ(s)) = a(s(t)) = a(t). (5) Then we define ea (s(t)) = a(s(t)) − a ˆ(s(t)), where a ˆ(s(t)) is the estimated cogging force, a ˆ(s(t)) = a ˆ(t) (note: t is the current time corresponding to the current

total passed trajectory s(t)). Here, let us change ea (s(t)) = a(s(t)) − a ˆ(s(t)) into time-domain such as: ea (s(t)) = a(t) − a ˆ(t) = ea (t). (6) In the same way, the following relationships are true: vd (s(t)) = vd (t), v(s(t)) = v(t), and the following notations are also defined eθ (t) = θd (t) − θ(t), ev (t) = vd (t) − v(t). (7) The control objective is to track or servo the given desired position θd (t) and the corresponding desired velocity vd (t) with tracking errors as small as possible. In practice, it is reasonable to assume that θd (t), vd (t) and v˙ d (t) are all bounded signals. The feedback controller is designed as: u(t) = v˙ d (t) + Tl0 +

a ˆ(t) + αm(t) + γev (t), J

(8)

with m(t) := γeθ (t) + ev (t),

(9)

where α and γ are positive gains; a ˆ(t) is an estimated cogging force from an adaptation mechanism to be specified later; v˙ d (t) is the desired acceleration; and eθ (s(t)) = eθ (t); and m(s(t)) = m(t). Our adaptation law is designed as follows: a ˆ(t) = z − µv,

(10)

µ is a positive design parameter; and the following tuning mechanism is designed for z: ev (t) ν . (11) 0 Dt z(t) = µ[v˙ d (t) + αm(t) + γev (t)] + J where ν ∈ (0, 1], z(t)|t=0 = 0. In this study we adopt the following Caputo definition for fractional derivative, which allows utilization of initial values of classical integer-order derivatives with known physical interpretations (Podlubny, 1999) 1 dα f (t) = dtα Γ(α − n)

Zt

f (n) (τ )dτ , (t − τ )α+1−n

(12)

0

where n is an integer satisfying n − 1 < α ≤ n. Remark 2.2. If ν ∈ (0, 1), our designed control law (10) is the new fractional order adaptive compensation scheme; if ν = 1, our designed control law (10) is the integer order adaptive compensation scheme (Luo et al., 2008c). Now, based on the above discussions, the following stability analysis of the proposed integer order and fractional order adaptive compensation schemes are performed in the frequency domain. Consider two cases: 1) when ν = 1 for integer order adaptive compensation method for cogging effect and 2) when 0 < ν < 1 for fractional order adaptive compensation method for cogging effect. 2.2 Stability Analysis of Integer Order Case First, let us consider the case 1) Integer order adaptive compensation scheme as ν = 1.

1 F0 (s) + a0 s + b0 + 1s c0 s = 3 F0 (s), s + a0 s2 + b0 s + c0

Theorem 2.1. If using the integer order adaptive compensation, the equilibrium points of eθ and ev are bounded as t → ∞. Proof 2.1. From (2), (8) and our adaptation law (10), we can get

Eθ (s) =

s2

(20)

where 1 v(t) ˙ = (v˙ d (t) + Tl0 + a ˆ(t) + αγeθ (t) + (α + γ)ev (t)) J 1 − a(t) − Tl0 − B1 (vd (t) − ev (t)) J 1 = v˙ d (t) + (z − µv(t)) + αγeθ (t) + (α + γ)ev (t) J 1 − a(t) − B1 (vd (t) − ev (t)) J 1 = v˙ d (t) + z + αγeθ (t) + (α + γ)ev (t) J 1 1 − a(t) − ( µ + B1 )(vd (t) − ev (t)) J J 1 = v˙ d (t) + αγeθ (t) + (α + γ + µ + B1 )ev (t) J 1 1 1 (13) − a(t) − ( µ + B1 )vd (t) + z(t), J J J and from (7), we have e˙ v = v˙ d (t) − v(t) ˙ 1 µ + B1 )ev (t) J 1 1 1 + a(t) + ( µ + B1 )vd (t) − z(t). J J J Then from (1), we further have = −αγeθ (t) − (α + γ +

(14)

˙ e˙ θ = θ˙d (t) − θ(t)

a0 = α + γ + b0 = αγ +

1 µ + B1 , J

1 1 µ(α + γ) + 2 , J J

1 µαγ, J 1 F0 (s) = A(s) + B1 Vd (s) J 1 +(1 + µs)vd (0)). J c0 =

As α,γ and µ are all positive design parameters, so a0 ,b0 and c0 are all positive values, and we have 1 1 1 µ + B1 )[αγ + µγ 2 + 2 ] J J J 1 1 = γ[αγ + µ(α + γ) + 2 ] J J > 0, (21) From Routh table technique, we can conclude that the system (20) is stable. Since a(t) and vd (t) are bounded, from the inverse Laplace transform f0 (t) = L−1 [F0 (s)] we can conclude the input signal f0 (t) in system (20) is bounded, so output signal eθ (t) in system (20) is also bounded. a0 b0 − c0 = (α +

Furthermore, from (15), we have

= vd (t) − v(t) = ev (t). Substituting (15) into (14) yields

(15)

s2 F0 (s). (22) + a0 + b0 s + c0 In the same way, we can conclude that the system (22) is stable and the error signal eθ (t) is also bounded. =

1 µ + B1 )e˙ θ (t) J 1 1 1 + a(t) + ( µ + B1 )vd (t) − z(t). (16) J J J Now, from (11), using integer order derivative, namely ν = 1, yields e¨θ (t) = −αγeθ (t) − (α + γ +

z(t) ˙ = µ[v˙ d (t) + αm(t) + γev (t)] +

Ev (s) = sEθ (s)

ev (t) . J

(17)

Then, using formula for the Laplace transform of (16) and (17) leads to 1 µ + B1 )sγEθ (s) + αγEθ (s) J 1 1 1 = A(s) + ( µ + B1 )Vd (s) + vd (0) − Z(s), (18) J J J s2 Eθ (s) + (α + γ +

µ µ (sVd (s) − vd (0)) + αγEθ (s) s s 1 +(µ(α + γ) + )Eθ (s). J Substituting (19) into (18) we can get

(19)

s2

So we can conclude that the equilibrium points of eθ and ev , are bounded as t → ∞. 2.3 Stability Analysis of Fractional Order Case Now, let us consider the case 2) Fractional order adaptive compensation scheme as 0 < ν < 1. Our major result is summarized in the following theorem. First of all, the following lemma is needed for the proof of Theorem 2.2. Lemma 2.1. An ordinary input/output relation (with only integer derivatives) can be written in a polynomial representation P (σ)ξ = Q(σ)u,

(23)

y = R(σ)ξ. ¯
Z(s) =

s3

where u ∈ the control, ξ ∈
If the triplet (P, Q, R) of polynomial matrices is minimal, we have the following equivalence: system (23) is boundedinput bounded-output iff det(P (σ)) 6= 0 ∀σ, |arg(σ)| < ν π2 . For a proof of Lemma 2.1, see (Matignon, 1996). Theorem 2.2. If choosing proper parameters α, γ and µ to ensure π |arg(wi )| > ν , 2 where wi are the solutions of equation (24), 2

2

2

w2pq+p + awpq+p + bwpq + dwp + c = 0,

(24)

1 )0 Dt1−ν eθ (t), J = µ(0 Dt1−ν vd (t) − vd (0)) + µαγ0 Dt−ν eθ (t) 1 +(µ(α + γ) + )0 Dt1−ν eθ (t). J By substituting (29) into (25) +(µ(α + γ) +

e¨θ (t) + ae˙ θ (t) + b0 Dt1−ν eθ (t) + c0 Dt−ν eθ (t) + deθ (t) = f (t), where

(30) 1 µ + B1 , J 1 1 b = µ(α + γ) + 2 , J J 1 c = µαγ, J d = αγ, 1 1 f (t) = a(t) + ( µ + B1 )vd (t) J J 1 1−ν − µ(0 Dt vd (t) − vd (0)). J a=α+γ +

where ν = p/q, p and q are positive integers, 1 µ + B1 , J 1 1 b = µ(α + γ) + 2 , J J 1 c = µαγ, J d = αγ. then the equilibrium points of eθ (t) and ev (t) are bounded, as t → ∞. Proof 2.2. From (13), (14) and (15), we also can get, a=α+γ +

1 e¨θ (t) = −αγeθ (t) − (α + γ + µ + B1 )e˙ θ (t) J 1 1 1 + a(t) + ( µ + B1 )vd (t) − z(t). J J J

L{0 Dt−p f (t); s} = s−p F (s),

(25)

(26)

from equations (2.113) and (2.115) in (Podlubny, 1999) p −p a Dt (a Dt f (t))

= f (t) − [a Dtp−1 f (t)]t=a

(t − a)p−1 , (27) Γ(p)

where 0 < p < 1. −p q q−p f (t) a Dt (a Dt f (t)) = a Dt



k X

[a Dtq−j f (t)]t=a

j=1

(t − a)p−j , Γ(1 + p − j)

L{0 Dtp f (t); s} = sp F (s) sk [0 Dtp−k−1 f (t)]t=0 ,

(33)

where 0 ≤ n − 1 ≤ p < n. Using formula for the Laplace transform of (30) leads to (s2 Eθ (s) − vd (0)) + a(s + bs1−ν + cs−ν + d)Eθ (s) = F (s) 1 1 = A(s) + ( µ + B1 )Vd (s) J J µs1−ν µ − vd (s) + vd (0), J Js so we can obtain

(34)

Eθ (s) 1 (F (s) + vd (0)) s2 + as1 + bs1−ν + cs−ν + d sν = 2+ν G(s), (35) 1+ν s + as + bs + c + dsν

where 0 < p and 0 < k − 1 < q < k.

=

As z(t)|t=0 = 0, eθ (t)|t=0 = 0 and ev (t)|t=0 = vd (0), we can get where

z(t) = 0 Dt−ν (0 Dtν z(t)) ev (t) } J

= 0 Dt−ν {µ[v˙ d (t) + αγeθ (t) + (α + γ)ev (t)] + = µ0 Dt−ν v˙ d (t) + µαγ0 Dt−ν eθ (t) 1 +(µ(α + γ) + )0 Dt−ν ev (t) J = µ0 Dt−ν v˙ d (t) + µαγ0 Dt−ν eθ (t)

n−1 X k=1

(28)

= 0 Dt−ν {µ[v˙ d (t) + αm(t) + γev (t)] +

(32)

where 0 < p.

− ev (t) = µ[v˙ d (t) + αm(t) + γev (t)] + , J

(31)

From equations (2.242) and (2.248) in (Podlubny, 1999)

Since ν 0 Dt z(t)

(29)

ev (t) } J

G(s) = F (s) + vd (0) 1 1 = A(s) + ( µ + B1 )Vd (s) J J µs1−ν µ − vd (s) + ( + 1)vd (0). J Js Denote that ν=

p , q

p

sν = s q ,

(36)

where p and q are positive integers. So, we have



Eθ (s) p

=

sq p

p

p

s2+ q + as1+ q + bs + c + ds q

G(s).

(37)

Denoting 1

w = s pq , then

dθ dt



θ

Eθ (w) Fig. 1. Block diagram of the cogging adaptive compensation in the PMSM position servo system model

2

=

w

2pq+p2

wp G(w). + awpq+p2 + bwpq + dwp2 + c

Table 1. PMSM Specifications

(38)

1.64 Kw 8 Nm 11.6 mH 6 0.0003 Nms

Rated speed Stator resistance Magnet flux Moment of Inertia

2000 rpm 2.125 Ω 0.387 0.00289 kgm2

4

0.03

3 0.02

2 Velocity error (rad/s)

g(t) = L−1 [G(s)]. we can conclude that the input signal g(t) in system (37) is bounded, so the output error signal eθ (t) in system (37) is also bounded.

Rated power Rated torque Stator inductance Number of poles Friction coefficient

Position error (rad)

From Lemma 2.1, m ¯ =n ¯ = 1, since we have π |arg(w)| > ν , 2 then system (37) is bound-input bound-output. Since a(t) and vd (t) are bounded, from the inverse Laplace transform

0.01

0

−0.01

1 0 −1 −2

−0.02

Furthermore, from (15), we have

−3

−0.03 0

1

2

+ aw

−4 0

6

1

2

pq+p2

+pq

+ bwpq + dwp2 + c

G(w).

(39) Similarly, we can conclude that the system (39) is stable and the error signal eθ (t) is also bounded. In summary, we can conclude that the equilibrium points of eθ and ev are bounded as t → ∞. 3. SIMULATION ILLUSTRATIONS USING PMSM POSITION SERVO SYSTEM MODEL In this section, we present two simulation tests to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed fractional order AC for cogging effect on the PMSM position servo control system model. Figure 1 shows the simulation block diagram. Details of this authentic simulation model can be found in (Luo et al., 2008d) • Case-1: Integer order adaptive compensation for multi-harmonics cogging effect; • Case-2: Fractional order adaptive compensation for the same cogging effect as in Case-1; For our simulation tests, the control gains in (8) were selected as: α = 50, γ = 20 and µ = 3. The motor parameters are given in Table 1 and the Tl = 1[N m]. And the actual cogging force is modeled as the state-period sinusoidal signal of multiple harmonics below: Fcogging = 2 cos(6θ) + cos(12θ) + 0.5 cos(18θ). 3.1 Case-1: Integer order adaptive compensation for multi-harmonics cogging effect In this case simulation test, choosing ν = 1 in adaptive law (10), namely, integer order periodic adaptive learning

3 Time (seconds)

4

5

6

(b) Velocity

Fig. 2. Tracking errors without compensation. 4 0.03

3 0.02

2 Velocity error (rad/s)

w

5

0.01

0

−0.01

1 0 −1 −2

−0.02

−0.03 0

−3

0.5

1

1.5

2

2.5 3 Time (seconds)

3.5

4

4.5

−4 0

5

0.5

1

(a) Position

1.5

2

2.5 3 Time (seconds)

3.5

4

4.5

5

(b) Velocity

Fig. 3. Tracking errors with integer order adaptive compensation (ν = 1). 0.03

4 3

0.02 2

0.01

Velocity error (rad/s)

wp

Position error (rad)

2

2pq+p2

4

(a) Position

Ev (w) = wpq Eθ (w) =

3 Time (seconds)

0

−0.01

1 0 −1 −2

−0.02 −3

−0.03 0

0.5

1

1.5

2

2.5 3 Time (seconds)

(a) Position

3.5

4

4.5

5

−4 0

0.5

1

1.5

2

2.5 3 Time (seconds)

3.5

4

4.5

5

(b) Velocity

Fig. 4. Tracking errors with fractional order adaptive compensation (ν = 0.5). compensation scheme is used for cogging effect minimization. As cogging effect degrades the performance of PMSM seriously in low speed range, and normally, the motor speed below the 3% of the rated speed always can be treated as in the low speed range, in our simulation system model, the rated speed of the PMSM is 2000 rpm , which is given in Table 1, so we choose the reference speed in this simulation as 5 rad/s = 47.77 rpm ≤ 60 rpm. So, for this

case simulation test, the following reference trajectory and velocity signals are used: sd (t) = 5t (rad),

(40)

vd (t) = 5 (rad/s).

(41)

Figures 3(a) and 3(b) show the position/speed tracking errors with compensation using integer order adaptive compensation. The integer order adaptive compensation method works efficiently comparing with the tracking errors without compensation in Figures 2(a) and 2(b). 3.2 Case-2: Fractional order adaptive compensation for multi-harmonics cogging effect In this case, for a fair comparison, the reference trajectory (40) and velocity (41) signals in Case-1 are used; and we use fractional order adaptive compensation for cogging effect. Here, in fractional order adaptation law (10), we choose ν = 0.5, and α = 50, γ = 20 and µ = 3, substituting the parameter values into (24), we can get five solutions w1 = 25.68808 + 55.53037i; w2 = 25.68808 − 55.53037i; w3 = 0.01285 + 2.32261i; w4 = 0.01285 − 2.32261i; w5 = −51.40188, so we can get |arg(w1 )| = |arg(w2 )| = >ν

π π = 0.5 = 0.25π; 2 2

|arg(w3 )| = |arg(w4 )| =

67.18o π = 0.3621π 180o 89.68o π = 0.4982π 180o

π π = 0.5 = 0.25π; 2 2 π π |arg(w5 )| = π > ν = 0.5 = 0.25π; 2 2



So the system should be bounded-input bounded-output stable according to our stability analysis presented in the last section. In the approximate realization for fractional order derivative, the frequency range of interest is designed (Xue et al., 2006) as [0.001, 1000]. Figures 4(a) and 4(b) show the position/speed tracking errors using fractional order adaptive compensation. Comparing with figures 3(a) and 3(b), we can clearly see that the performance of using fractional order adaptive compensation method is much better than that of using integer order adaptive compensation for multi-harmonics cogging effect. Remark 3.1. In the course of simulation, we found that changing the parameter µ does not improve the performance of the position and velocity tracking effectively in the PMSM position servo simulation model. 4. CONCLUSION In this paper, for the first time, a fractional order adaptive compensation method is proposed to compensate the cogging effect in PMSM position and velocity servo system. In our FO-AC scheme, a new fractional order adaptive compensator for cogging effect is designed to guarantee the boundedness of all signals. Stability properties have been proven for the system with the traditional integer order adaptive compensator and the proposed fractional order adaptive compensator respectively. Simulation results are

presented to illustrate the advantage of the proposed fractional order AC for cogging effect. This new fractional order scheme performs better than the traditional integer order method, the state position/speed tracking errors using the FO-AC is much smaller than that using the IO-AC. Furthermore, although the suggested FO-AC method is developed for the cogging force compensation, our method also can be used to compensate other state-dependent periodic disturbances. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Ying Luo would like to thank Dr. Youguo Pi for his valuable guidance of building the PMSM servo system, Dr. Huifang Dou for her expertise in cogging compensation of PMLM (permanent magnet linear motor) and Mr. Yan Li for his valuable suggestions on the fractional order adaptive compensation stability proof and to the China Scholarship Council (CSC) for the financial support. The authors acknowledge the benefits from the weekly Fractional Calculus Reading Group meeting at CSOIS (http://mechatronics.ece.usu.edu/foc/yan.li/). REFERENCES Hyo-Sung Ahn, YangQuan Chen, and Huifang Dou. Stateperiodic adaptive compensation of cogging and coulomb friction in permanent-magnet linear motors. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 41(1):90 – 98, 2005. S. Ladaci and A. Charef. On fractional adaptive control. Nonlinear Dynamics, 43(4):365 – 378, 2006a. S. Ladaci and A. Charef. An adaptive fractional PID controller. In Proceedings TMCE 2006 International Symposium Series on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering, pages 1533 – 1540, Ljubljana, Slovenia, April 18 - 22 2006b. Ying Luo, YangQuan Chen, Hyo-Sung Ahn, and YouGuo Pi. Design of dual-high-order dynamic periodic adaptive learning controller for long-term cogging effect compensation. In IEEE International Conference on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision (ICARCV08) (accepted), Hanoi, Vietnam, 17-20 December 2008a. Ying Luo, YangQuan Chen, Hyo-Sung Ahn, and YouGuo Pi. A high order periodic adaptive learning compensator for cogging effect in PMSM position servo system. In IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC08)(accepted), Singapore, 12-15 October 2008b. Ying Luo, YangQuan Chen, Hyo-Sung Ahn, and YouGuo Pi. A high order periodic adaptive learning compensator for cogging effect in PMSM position servo system. IEEE Trans. on Magnetics (submitted), 2008c. Ying Luo, YangQuan Chen, and YouGuo Pi. Authentic simulation studies of periodic adaptive learning compensation of cogging effect in PMSM position servo system. In Proceedings of the 20-th Chinese Conference on Decision and Control (CCDC08), Yantai, Shandong, China, July 2008d. D. Matignon. Stability results for fractional differential equations with applications to control processing. In Computational Engineering in Systems Applications, pages 963–968, Lille, France, July 1996. C. A. Monje, B. M. Vinagre, V. Feliu, and Y. Q. Chen. Tuning and auto-tuning of fractional order controllers for industry applications. IFAC: Control Engineering Practice, 16(7):798–812, 2008. K. B. Oldham and J. Spanier. The Fractional Calculus. Academic Press, New York and London, 1974. I. Podlubny. Fractional Differential Equations. Academic Press, 1999. B. M. Vinagre, I. Petras, I. Podlubny, and Y. Q. Chen. Using fractional order adjustment rules and fractional order reference models in model reference adaptive control. Nonlinear Dynamics, 29:269 – 279, 2002. J.-X. Xu, S. K. Pands, Y.-J. Pan, and T. H. Lee. A modular control scheme for PMSM speed control with pulsating torque minimization. IEEE Trans. on Ind. Electron., 51:526 – 536, 2004. D. Y. Xue, C. N. Zhao, and Y. Q. Chen. Fractional order PID control of a DC-motor with elastic shaft: a case study. In Proc. of American Control Conference, pages 3182–3187, MN, USA, June 2006. AACC.

Fractional Order Adaptive Compensation for ... - Semantic Scholar

1. J. µ + B1)Vd(s). −. µs1−ν. J vd(s)+(. µ. Js. + 1)vd(0). (36). Denote that ν = p q. , sν = s p q , ..... minimization. IEEE Trans. on Ind. Electron., 51:526 – 536, 2004.

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