Evolution, 60(5), 2006, pp. 1086–1097

EVOLUTIONARY SIGNIFICANCE OF GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN A PLUMAGE-BASED FORAGING ADAPTATION: AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST IN THE SLATE-THROATED REDSTART (MYIOBORUS MINIATUS) RONALD L. MUMME,1,2 MARK L. GALATOWITSCH,1,3 PIOTR G. JABŁON´SKI,4,5,6 TADEUSZ M. STAWARCZYK,7,8 JAKUB P. CYGAN9,10 1 Department

of Biology, Allegheny College, Meadville, Pennsylvania 16335-3902 2 E-mail: [email protected] 3 E-mail: [email protected] 4 Centre for Ecological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 05-092 Łomianki, Dziekano ´ w Les´ny, Poland 5 University of Arizona, Arizona Research Laboratories Division of Neurobiology, 611 Gould-Simpson Building, Tucson, Arizona 85721 6 E-mail: [email protected] 7 Museum of Natural History, Wroclaw University, Sienkiewicza 21, 50-335 Wroclaw, Poland 8 E-mail: [email protected] 9 Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wilcza 64, 00-679 Warszawa, Poland 10 E-mail: [email protected] Abstract. Geographic variation in the plumage pattern of birds is widespread but poorly understood, and in very few cases has its evolutionary significance been investigated experimentally. Neotropical warblers of the genus Myioborus use their contrasting black-and-white plumage to flush insect prey during animated foraging displays. Although previous experimental work has demonstrated that white plumage patches are critical to flush-pursuit foraging success, the amount of white in the plumage shows considerable interspecific and intraspecific geographic variation. We investigated the evolutionary significance of this geographic variation by experimentally decreasing or increasing the amount of white in the tail of slate-throated redstarts (Myioborus miniatus comptus) from Monteverde, Costa Rica, to mimic the natural extremes of tail pattern variation in this species. In addition to measuring the effects of plumage manipulation on foraging performance, we performed field experiments measuring the escape response of a common insect prey species (an asilid fly) using model redstarts representing four different Myioborus plumage patterns. Our experiments were designed to test four hypotheses that could explain geographic variation in plumage pattern. Compared to controls, experimental birds with reduced-white tails that mimic the plumage pattern of M. miniatus hellmayri of Guatemala showed significant reductions in flush-pursuit foraging performance. In contrast, the addition of white to the tail to mimic the plumage pattern of M. miniatus verticalis of Bolivia had no significant effect on foraging performance of Costa Rican redstarts. In field experiments with asilid flies, model redstarts simulating the plumage of M. miniatus comptus of Costa Rica and M. miniatus verticalis of Bolivia elicited greater responses than did models of other Myioborus taxa with either less or more white in the plumage. The results of our experiments with both birds and insects allow us to reject two hypotheses for geographic variation in plumage pattern: (1) that geographic variation is a nonadaptive result of genetic drift, and (2) that selection for enhanced flush-pursuit foraging performance generally favors increased white in the plumage, but evolutionary trade-offs constrain the evolution of extensive patches of white in some geographic regions. Instead, our results suggest that geographic variation in the plumage pattern of Myioborus redstarts reflects adaptation to regional habitat characteristics that enhances flush-pursuit foraging performance. Key words. Adaptation, Asilidae, flush-pursuit foraging, foraging performance, geographic variation, Myioborus, plumage pattern. Received January 12, 2006.

Geographic variation in plumage pattern has played a prominent role in the development of avian systematics. It has historically been critical in the establishment of specific and subspecific taxonomic boundaries, and in the development and testing of geographic models of avian speciation (Mayr 1942, 1963; Zink and Remsen 1986, Bensch et al. 1999; Zink and Dittmann 1993; Zink 1994; Mayr and Diamond 2001). In spite of its historical importance and near ubiquity among birds, geographic variation in plumage pattern remains largely enigmatic; the evolutionary processes responsible for intra- and interspecific geographic variation in plumage pattern have seldom been investigated experimentally (e.g., Hill 1993; Marchetti 1993; Sætre et al. 1997), and they are well understood in relatively few cases (Snow 1954; Aldrich and James 1991; Price and Pavelka 1996; Marchetti and Price 1997; Sætre et al. 1997; Hughes et al. 2001). In most instances, it is unknown whether geographic variation

Accepted March 6, 2006.

in plumage pattern is a nonadaptive result of genetic drift or a product of geographically varying natural or sexual selection (Remsen 1984; Burtt 1986; Zink and Remsen 1986; Aldrich and James 1991; James 1991; Roulin 2003). Conspicuous plumage patterns in birds usually function as social or sexual signals directed toward conspecifics (Savalli 1995). However, in a very few species of birds (the flushpursuit insectivores), contrasting plumage functions primarily as a foraging adaptation. Flush-pursuit insectivores exploit the visually mediated escape behavior of many insects by using conspicuous visual displays of their contrasting plumage patches to flush potential prey that can be pursued and captured in flight (Remsen and Robinson 1990; Jabłon´ ski 1999; Mumme 2002). The New World warbler genus Myioborus comprises 12 species of sexually monomorphic flushpursuit insectivores found in montane forests throughout the American tropics and subtropics (Curson et al. 1994). In all

1086 q 2006 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved.

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FIG. 1. Representative geographic variation in tail pattern and overall plumage in Myioborus redstarts, as illustrated by the painted redstart (M. pictus) and slate-throated redstart (M. miniatus).

members of the genus both sexes have contrasting black-andwhite plumage patches that are exposed by spreading the wing and tail during animated foraging displays. By experimentally darkening the white feathers of birds in the field, and by testing the response of insects to models of foraging birds, recent research has demonstrated that the presence of contrasting black-and-white plumage patches is critical in triggering prey escape behavior during flush-pursuit foraging, in both the painted redstart (Myioborus pictus) in Arizona (Jabłon´ski 1999, 2001; Jabłon´ski and Strausfeld 2000, 2001) and the slate-throated redstart (Myioborus miniatus) in Costa Rica (Mumme 2002; Galatowitsch and Mumme 2004). What is not clear from this previous work, however, is why the pattern and extent of white in the plumage of Myioborus redstarts shows considerable interspecific and intraspecific geographic variation (Curson et al. 1994). For example, although all Myioborus redstarts have white-tipped outer tail feathers, the painted redstart also has conspicuous white wing patches that are lacking in all other members of the genus (Fig. 1). In the most widely distributed member of the genus, the slate-throated redstart, considerable intraspecific variation in the extent of white in the tail exists among the 12

recognized subspecies (Paynter 1968), with the least amount of white evident in the subspecies M. miniatus hellmayri from northern Central America, an intermediate amount of white in M. miniatus comptus of Costa Rica, and the most extensive white found in M. miniatus verticalis from Bolivia (Curson et. al. 1994; Fig. 1). Given the compelling experimental evidence that the contrasting black-and-white plumage is an important foraging adaptation in Myioborus redstarts, why does the extent and pattern of white in the plumage vary geographically? Assuming that the geographic variation in plumage pattern has an underlying genetic basis, four hypotheses could potentially account for the variation. The four hypotheses encompass a broad spectrum of evolutionary possibilities that coexist within the framework of ‘‘the adaptationist program’’ and its alternatives (Gould and Lewontin 1979; Pigliucci and Kaplan 2000). Nonadaptive geographic variation. Under this hypothesis, some white in the plumage is necessary for successful flush-pursuit foraging of Myioborus redstarts, but quantitative variation in its extent is inconsequential to foraging performance. If this hypothesis is true, then geographic variation

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FIG. 2. Predictions of four hypotheses for geographic variation in plumage pattern of Myioborus redstarts. The four hypotheses make different predictions about how experimentally reducing or increasing the extent of white in the tail of Costa Rican slate-throated redstarts (M. miniatus comptus) would affect flush-pursuit foraging performance.

in plumage pattern is a result of either nonadaptive genetic drift or some other evolutionary process (e.g., selection for enhanced social signaling: Marchetti 1993; Marchetti and Price 1997) unrelated to foraging performance. Evolutionary trade-offs. This hypothesis proposes that selection for enhanced flush-pursuit foraging performance generally favors increased white in the plumage, but that geographically varying evolutionary trade-offs may constrain the evolution of more extensive patches of white in some species or populations. For example, because contrasting white plumage patches may make individuals more conspicuous to visually oriented predators, and because predation risk may vary geographically, the costs of bearing extensive white in the plumage may also vary geographically. Diminishing returns. This hypothesis proposes that flushpursuit foraging performance generally increases with the extent of white in the tail but is subject to geographically varying diminishing returns. Under the diminishing returns hypothesis, the extent of white in the plumage reflects the point at which regional prey or habitat characteristics produce diminishing returns in foraging performance. Regional optimum. Under the regional optimum hypothesis, plumage pattern reflects precise adaptation to regional prey or habitat characteristics that maximizes flush-pursuit foraging performance. Variation in plumage pattern would therefore reflect either geographic variation in the primary insect prey, geographic variation in the neural properties of prey escape circuits, geographic variation in the physical characteristics of the habitat against which displaying birds are viewed by potential prey, or a combination of these factors.

Significantly, the four hypotheses described above make unique predictions about how experimental manipulation of the extent of white in the tail of Costa Rican slate-throated redstarts (M. miniatus comptus) would affect flush-pursuit foraging performance in the field (Fig. 2). For example, the nonadaptive geographic variation hypothesis predicts that incremental changes in the extent of white in the tail of Costa Rican redstarts, either reduction or enhancement, would have no effect on flush-pursuit foraging performance (Fig. 2A). The evolutionary trade-offs hypothesis, in contrast, predicts that reducing the extent of white in the tail should reduce flush-pursuit foraging performance whereas increasing the extent of white should increase foraging success (Fig. 2B). The diminishing returns hypothesis predicts that reducing the extent of white in the tail will reduce foraging success, but that increasing the extent of white should have no significant effect on foraging performance (Fig. 2C). Finally, the regional optimum hypothesis predicts that any incremental change in the extent of white in the tail of Costa Rican redstarts, either reduction or enhancement, would be detrimental to foraging performance (Fig. 2D). Here we present the results of a series of field experiments designed to test the predictions of the four hypotheses described above. First, we conducted experiments in which the amount of white in the tail of Costa Rican slate-throated redstarts was experimentally reduced or increased to simulate the natural extremes of geographic variation in tail pattern in this species (Fig. 1). These experiments, although similar in design to those described previously (Jabłon´ski 1999; Mumme 2002), are novel in their focus on creating plumages that reflect naturally occurring geographic variation. Second,

GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN PLUMAGE ADAPTATION

we examined the escape behavior of a common insect prey species (an asilid fly) in response to models of Myioborus redstarts representing four different plumage patterns found in the genus. The work on the asilid fly was modeled on similar experiments conducted on fulgoroid and cicadoid homopterans by Galatowitsch and Mumme (2004). MATERIALS

AND

METHODS

Study Site and Study Species Fieldwork was conducted May–July, 2002–2004, at the Estacio´n Biolo´gica Monteverde and surrounding properties in Monteverde, Costa Rica (Nadkarni and Wheelwright 2000), where we have been studying a color-banded population of slate-throated redstarts since January 2000 (Mumme 2002). The study site includes primary premontane and lower montane wet forest (Haber 2000), old second-growth forest, and abandoned pastures with scattered trees at elevation 1400–1700 m. In Costa Rica, the slate-throated redstart is socially monogamous and generally lives as pairs on permanent territories (Shopland 1985; Stiles and Skutch 1989). During the nesting season (March–June), redstarts lay two to three eggs in domed nests in banks along roads or trails or in a niche on a steep slope (Skutch 1954; Shopland 1985; Stiles and Skutch 1989). Although they occasionally take larval insects or other nonflying invertebrates, slate-throated redstarts prey primarily on a variety of flying insects (Shopland 1985), and representatives of the orders Homoptera and Diptera comprise more than 85% of prey items delivered to nestlings (P. G. Jabłon´ski, K. Laseter, R. L. Mumme, M. Borowiec, J. P. Cygan, J. Pereira, and E. Sergiej, unpubl. ms.). The two main foraging tactics employed by slate-throated redstarts in Costa Rica are flycatching and flush-pursuit foraging (Mumme 2002). Flycatching redstarts typically perch relatively motionless in the upper understory or lower canopy and sally after flying insects, returning either to the same perch or a neighboring perch. During flush-pursuit foraging, redstarts hop steadily through vegetation or along branches and tree trunks until flushing a potential prey item, which they then attack in aerial pursuit flights. Most instances of flush-pursuit prey attacks follow a series of hops in the characteristic Myioborus spread-tail foraging posture (Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.). Our experiments with insects were conducted using a robber fly, Holcocephala sp. (family Asilidae; Fisher and Hespenheide 1992). This species is abundant at the study site and is a significant component of the diet of slate-throated redstarts in Monteverde, comprising about 7% of the food items delivered to nestlings (Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.). Reduced-White Experiment This field experiment was performed using eight nesting pairs of redstarts during 2002, based on methods successfully employed by Mumme (2002). We first located nests containing two to three nestlings that were five to nine days old. We then documented pretreatment feeding rates at the nest by the color-banded adults by conducting a 1–2 h nest watch from an observation blind. We then mist-netted the pair at

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the nest and assigned one member of the pair to the experimental (reduced-white) treatment group, while its mate was assigned to the control (sham-reduced) treatment group. For the eight experimental birds, the three white-tipped outer tail feathers were partially darkened with a black marking pen (a Staedler [Chatsworth, CA] Permanent Marker 350) to simulate the plumage pattern of M. miniatus hellmayri of Guatemala (Fig. 1). The mates of the experimental birds were sham-darkened by applying approximately the same amount of black ink to the naturally black proximal regions of the same three feathers (Fig. 1). Spectrophotometric measures indicate that the reflectance spectrum of white tail feathers blackened in this way is similar to that of naturally black Myioborus feathers (P. G. Jabłon´ski, unpubl. data). Following plumage manipulation, we measured posttreatment feeding rates at the nest (nestling age 6–10 days) by means of a nest watch conducted at the same time of day as the pretreatment watch. We then calculated the change in hourly feeding rate (posttreatment rate minus pretreatment rate) for both experimental and control birds. For one to three days following plumage manipulation, we collected foraging data on experimental and control birds following methods described by Mumme (2002). After locating and identifying a redstart, we followed the individual and used a hand-held tape recorder to record all movements (flights, hops in normal posture, and hops in the spread-tail display posture) and prey attacks. For prey attacks we noted whether the attack was immediately preceded (within approximately 0.5 sec) by one or more hops in either the characteristic spread-tail foraging posture (Jabłon´ski 1999; Mumme 2002) or the foraging posture typical of other parulid warblers. Because prey items were usually small and difficult to see, we were seldom able to determine whether a given prey attack was successful or unsuccessful. We therefore used prey attacks rather than successful prey captures in analyses of foraging behavior. All data collected from an individual bird were combined to produce a single sample of foraging behavior for each individual. The mean duration of the foraging sample was 443 sec (range 244–773 sec) for reduced-white experimental birds and 472 sec (range 179–866 sec) for sham-reduced controls. Based on the results of earlier experiments in which tails were completely blackened (Mumme 2002), we predicted that reduced-white plumage manipulations could have direct or indirect effects on three measures of foraging success (Mumme 2002): (1) flush-pursuit foraging efficiency (the percentage of hops in the spread-tail posture that were followed within 0.5 sec by an attack on a prey item), (2) total prey attack rate (attacks/min), and (3) the change in food delivery rate to nestlings (change in feedings/h). In our analysis, we therefore focus primarily on these three measures. However, to ensure that plumage manipulations did not influence other aspects of foraging performance and thus potentially confound any effects on the three primary variables, we also examined the effects of plumage manipulations on three other aspects of total foraging performance: (4) flycatching attack rate (attacks/min), (5) total movement rate (hops/min), and (6) flush-pursuit foraging intensity—the percentage of all hops that were made in the spread-tail foraging posture. Based on earlier results (Mumme 2002), reduction in the

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amount of white in the tail was predicted to have no significant influence on these components of foraging performance. Reduced-white experiments were conducted 19 May–6 June 2002. For the first of the eight pairs treated, the female was randomly assigned as the experimental (reduced-white) bird. To ensure that equal numbers of males and females were subsequently assigned as experimental birds, and to maintain an equal balance throughout the duration of the nesting season, we a priori established the sequence male, male, female, female, male, male, female as experimental birds for the remaining seven pairs treated. Because of the matched-pairs nature of the experimental design, and because our four hypotheses predicted that reducing the extent of white in the tail would either impair or have no effect on foraging performance (Fig. 2), we used one-tailed matchedpairs t-tests for all statistical comparisons of experimental and control birds. Increased-White Experiment This field experiment was performed over a two-year period (2003–2004) using eight nesting pairs of redstarts. Methods were virtually identical to those used in the reducedwhite experiment, except that we increased the extent of white in the tail of experimental birds (n 5 8) by bilaterally adding fast-drying typewriter correction fluid (Bic [Milford, CT] Quick Dry Wite-Out) to the most distal black portions of the four outer tail feathers, thereby simulating the plumage pattern of M. miniatus verticalis of Bolivia (Fig. 1). The mates of increased-white birds were sham-whitened by applying approximately the same amount of correction fluid to the naturally white tips of the three outer tail feathers (Fig. 1). Spectrophotometric measures indicate that tail feathers whitened in this way are more reflective of ultraviolet (UV) light than naturally white tail feathers (P. G. Jabłon´ ski, unpubl. data). However, because very little UV light is available in the subcanopy and understory habitat of slate-throated redstarts in Monteverde during the rainy season when these experiments were performed (Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.), and because the same amount of correction fluid was applied to the feathers of both whitened and sham-whitened birds, the change in UV reflectance of the feathers is unlikely to confound the results of the experiment. Increased-white experiments were conducted 20 May–4 June 2003 (n 5 6 pairs) and 19–24 May 2004 (n 5 2 pairs). For the first of the eight pairs treated, the female was randomly assigned as the experimental (increased-white) bird. To ensure that equal numbers of males and females were subsequently assigned as experimental birds, and to maintain an equal balance throughout the duration of the nesting season and across the two years, we a priori established the sequence male, male, female, female, male, male, female as experimental birds for the remaining seven pairs treated. The mean duration of the foraging sample was 531 sec (range 302–844 sec) for increased-white experimental birds and 428 sec (range 207–708 sec) for sham-increased controls. As in the reduced-white experiment, we used matched-pairs t-tests for all statistical comparisons of experimental and control birds. However, because the four hypotheses we were testing predict that increasing the extent of white in the tail could

impair, enhance, or have no effect on foraging performance (Fig. 2), we used two-tailed tests rather than one-tailed tests. Response of Asilid Flies to Model Redstarts Field experiments with the robber fly Holcocephala sp. (family Asilidae) were conducted between 25 June and 11 July 2003. Models simulating four different plumage patterns found in M. miniatus and M. pictus, plus an all-black control model, were constructed as described by Galatowitsch and Mumme (2004). The different Myioborus plumage patterns represented M. miniatus hellmayri, M. miniatus comptus, M. miniatus verticalis, and M. pictus (Fig. 1). Models were made from stiff black cardboard and had the size and two-dimensional projection of an approaching Myioborus redstart in its characteristic foraging display; crouched with an erect spread tail and drooped spread wings (Jabłon´ski and Strausfeld 2000). Models were attached at an angle 45–608 from the horizontal to a 2-m pole that was painted black and marked with 1-cm increments for measuring distances to test flies (Galatowitsch and Mumme 2004). Robber flies were found by searching for individuals perched on plants in secondary forest and along forest edges within or near territories of slate-throated redstarts. When a suitable fly was encountered, a camouflaged investigator attached one of the five bird models to the pole and moved the model toward the insect, starting from a distance of approximately 1.5 m. The foraging behavior of Myioborus redstarts was simulated by moving the model toward the perched fly, as described by Galatowitsch and Mumme (2004). If a fly flushed and flew in response to the approaching model, the distance between the model and the insect when it flew was recorded. If the fly did not respond until the model touched it, the response distance was recorded as zero. Flies were tested in temporal randomized blocks of five flies; in other words, the first five flies encountered on a given test day comprised an experimental block, and each fly within the block was tested with one of the five bird models in a randomized order of model presentation. The five flies comprising a block were tested on the same day and within the same two-hour period, to control for daily variation in environmental conditions. Twenty blocks of five flies were tested, yielding a total sample of 100 flies. Response distance data were analyzed with a randomized block ANOVA in which bird model type was used as the main factor while experimental block was used as an additional factor to help control for the effects of time, temperature, weather, and so on. To equalize variances and avoid problems with response distances of 0 cm, we transformed the data by calculating log(response distance 1 1 cm). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons were performed using the Student-Newman-Keuls procedure (Ott 1993). RESULTS Reduced-White Experiment Experimental reduction of the extent of white in the tail of Costa Rican slate-throated redstarts significantly reduced their flush-pursuit foraging efficiency, as measured by the percentage of hops in the spread-tail posture that were fol-

GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN PLUMAGE ADAPTATION

lowed by a prey attack. For experimental birds with reducedwhite tails, only 11.1% of hops in the spread-tail posture were followed by a prey attack, versus 21.2% for sham-darkened controls (matched pairs t 5 3.74, df 5 7, P 5 0.0036; Fig 3A, Table 1). In addition, the overall prey attack rate for reduced-white birds was 3.0 attacks per min, significantly lower than the mean of 4.8 attacks per min for control birds (matched-pairs t 5 4.50, df 5 7, P 5 0.0014; Fig. 3B, Table 1). However, these differences in foraging performance did not significantly influence the relative change in rates at which experimental and control birds delivered food to their nestlings (Fig. 3C, Table 1). The difference in overall prey attack rate between reducedwhite experimental birds and control birds appears to be attributable primarily to the significant difference in flush-pursuit foraging efficiency and not to other aspects of foraging performance; differences between experimental and control birds were small and not statistically significant for flycatching attack rate, movement rate (hops per min), or the percentage of hops in the spread-tail posture (Fig. 3D–F). Increased-White Experiment Experimental addition of white to the tail of Costa Rican slate-throated redstarts had no significant effect on any measure of foraging performance (Fig. 4A–F). For example, flush-pursuit foraging efficiency, measured by the percentage of hops in the spread-tail posture followed by a prey attack, was virtually identical for increased-white experimental birds and controls, 15.3% and 15.9% respectively (matched pairs t 5 0.20, df 5 7, P 5 0.85; Fig 4A). Similarly, the overall prey attack rate for increased-white experimental birds was 3.4 attacks per min compared to 3.1 attacks per min for shamincreased control birds (matched-pairs t 5 20.70, df 5 7, P 5 0.51; Fig. 4B). Response of Asilid Flies to Model Redstarts The response distance of asilid flies varied significantly with the five different plumage patterns represented by the bird models (randomized block ANOVA F4,76 5 7.16, P , 0.0001; Fig. 5). The model representing the plumage pattern of Costa Rican M. miniatus comptus produced the greatest mean response distance, and post-hoc comparisons indicated that this model differed significantly from models representing M. miniatus hellmayri, M. pictus, and the all-black control (Student-Newman-Keuls, all P , 0.05) but not from the model representing M. miniatus verticalis of Bolivia (Student-Newman-Keuls P . 0.05). DISCUSSION Our results allow us to reject two of the four hypotheses that could explain geographic variation in the plumage pattern of Myioborus redstarts. First, the nonadaptive geographic variation hypothesis is inconsistent with the results of both our bird and insect experiments. This hypothesis predicted that incremental changes in the extent of white in the plumage of Costa Rican redstarts should have no significant effect on foraging performance (Fig. 2A). The hypothesis also predicted that any of the four bird models representing actual

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Myioborus plumage patterns should be equally effective at flushing asilid flies under Costa Rican field conditions. Neither prediction was upheld by our results. Redstarts with reduced-white tails that mimicked the plumage pattern of M. miniatus hellmayri had significantly poorer flush-pursuit foraging performance than did controls (Fig. 3, Table 1). Furthermore, the models of M. miniatus hellmayri of Guatemala and M. pictus of Arizona were significantly less effective at startling asilids than were models of Costa Rican M. miniatus comptus, a result that parallels findings from six species of fulgoroid and cicadoid homopterans (Galatowitsch and Mumme 2004). Therefore, geographic variation in plumage pattern of Myioborus redstarts is clearly not inconsequential to flushpursuit foraging performance. We can also reject the evolutionary trade-offs hypothesis, which posits that an increasing amount of white in the plumage generally improves foraging performance, but that geographically varying trade-offs result in less-than-maximal amounts of white in many populations. This hypothesis predicted a positive relationship between the extent of white in the plumage and foraging performance (Fig. 2B). It also predicted that model redstarts representing plumage patterns with extensive white (i.e., Myioborus pictus) should be more effective at eliciting escape responses in Costa Rican flies than models representing taxa with minimal white (i.e., M. miniatus hellmayri). Neither prediction was upheld by our results. The flush-pursuit foraging performance of Costa Rican redstarts with increased-white tails that mimic the plumage pattern of M. miniatus verticalis of Bolivia was not significantly greater than that of controls (Fig. 4, Table 1). Furthermore, the model representing the plumage pattern of M. pictus was significantly less effective (not more effective) in eliciting escape behavior in asilid flies, a result also found in homopterans (Galatowitsch and Mumme 2004). Our results are most consistent with elements of both the diminishing returns and regional optimum hypotheses (Fig. 2C,D). Both hypotheses successfully predicted decreased flush-pursuit foraging performance for Costa Rican redstarts with reduced-white tails (Fig. 3, Table 1) as well as reduced effectiveness at flushing asilid flies for models representing this reduced-white plumage pattern (Fig. 5). The diminishing returns hypothesis also successfully predicted (Fig. 2C) that the addition of white to the tail of Costa Rican redstarts should have no significant effect on flush-pursuit foraging performance (Fig. 4, Table 1), and that under Costa Rican field conditions, models representing M. miniatus verticalis of Bolivia would be just as effective at flushing asilid flies as would models representing Costa Rican M. miniatus comptus (Fig. 5). However, the diminishing returns hypothesis did not predict the significant reduction in the effectiveness of models of M. pictus (Fig. 5), a prediction made by the regional optimum hypothesis (Fig. 2D). When the effects of all plumage manipulation experiments–including those of Mumme (2002)—are plotted on a single figure (Fig. 6) and the results compared to experiments with both homopterans (Galatowitsch and Mumme 2004) and asilid flies (this study; Fig. 5), a clear explanation emerges as to why Costa Rican slate-throated redstarts have the specific plumage pattern that they do. First, any Costa Rican redstarts with relatively little white in the tail (i.e., like M.

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FIG. 3. Effect of reduced-white experiment on (A) flush-pursuit foraging efficiency (the percentage of hops in the spread-tail posture that were followed by an attack on a prey item), (B) prey attack rates, (C) change in feeding rate at nests, (D) flycatching attack rate, (E) hop rate, and (F) percentage of hops that were made in the spread-tail foraging posture for experimental birds with reduced-white tails and sham-reduced controls. In each panel, the thick horizontal bars and thin vertical bars designate the mean and standard error, respectively. Statistical significance of differences between experimental and control birds, as determined by one-tailed matched pairs t-test, is also shown.

TABLE 1. Effects of reduced-white and increased-white plumage manipulation on variables related to flush-pursuit foraging performance in the slate-throated redstart. Flush-pursuit foraging efficiency is the percentage of hops in the spread-tail posture followed by an attack on a prey item. Means 6 standard deviation, P-values (matched-pairs t test), effect size (experimental mean 2 control mean), and the 95% confidence interval for effect size are shown.

P

Effect size (Experimental 2 Control)

Lower

Upper

11.1 6 5.2 2.98 6 0.96 0.7 6 3.3

0.0036 0.0014 0.73

210.1 21.82 1.4

215.5 23.04 22.2

24.6 20.61 5.0

15.3 6 4.6 3.38 6 1.00 0.6 6 4.6

0.85 0.51 0.68

20.6 0.28 0.6

26.3 20.72 24.8

5.0 1.28 6.1

Experimental mean 6 SD

Reduced-white experiment Flush-pursuit foraging efficiency (%) 21.2 6 5.1 Prey attack rate (attacks/min) 4.80 6 1.28 Change in food delivery rate at nest (feedings/h) 20.7 6 3.4 Increased-white experiment Flush-pursuit foraging efficiency (%) Prey attack rate (attacks/min) Change in food delivery rate at nest (feedings/h)

Control mean 6 SD

15.9 6 5.9 3.10 6 0.86 0.0 6 5.5

95% CI

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FIG. 4. Effect of increased-white experiment on (A) flush-pursuit foraging efficiency (the percentage of hops in the spread-tail posture that were followed by an attack on a prey item), (B) prey attack rates, (C) change in feeding rate at nests, (D) flycatching attack rate, (E) hop rate, and (F) percentage of hops that were made in the spread-tail foraging posture for sham-increased control birds and experimental birds with increased-white tails. In each panel, the thick horizontal bars and thin vertical bars designate the mean and standard error, respectively. Statistical significance of differences between control and experimental birds, as determined by two-tailed matched pairs t-test, is also shown.

miniatus hellmayri of northern Central America) would have significantly reduced flush-pursuit foraging performance and presumably be at a strong selective disadvantage. Second, Costa Rican slate-throated redstarts do not have slightly more white in the tail (i.e., like M. miniatus verticalis of Bolivia) because the additional white would not enhance flush-pursuit foraging performance and could even reduce it (Fig. 6). Finally, although we were unable to perform plumage manipulation experiments to corroborate this conclusion, the results of the insect experiments indicate that an extensive-white plumage pattern like that of M. pictus would be decidedly maladaptive in Costa Rica, resulting in significantly reduced flush-pursuit foraging performance (Fig. 5). The main question raised by our results is, therefore, why some taxa of Myioborus redstarts have plumage patterns that would clearly be maladaptive under Costa Rican field conditions. One hypothesis is a prey-specific hypothesis (Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.); different populations of Myioborus redstarts may exploit insect prey that have different

patterns of visual sensitivities or escape behavior, leading to selection for geographic variation in Myioborus plumage pattern. Although this is an attractive hypothesis, the neural pathways that govern insect escape behavior are highly conserved and extremely simple (Bacon and Strausfeld 1986; Milde and Strausfeld 1990; Jabłon´ski and Strausfeld 2000, 2001; Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.), and significant geographic variation in how those systems respond to subtly different types of visual signals may not exist. For example, although the six species of homopterans tested by Galatowitsch and Mumme (2004) varied by an order of magnitude in their overall sensitivity to model redstarts, the shape of the response curve to the different models was similar for all six species and virtually identical to the shape of the response curve for asilid flies (Fig. 5; Galatowitsch and Mumme 2004). Thus, it is possible that the evolutionarily conserved neural architecture of the insect visual system may constrain the extent to which geographic variation in the visual sensitivity of insect prey can evolve. Detailed studies of the prey base

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FIG. 5. Mean response distance of asilid flies in reaction to an approaching bird model. Error bars represent one standard error of the mean. Also shown for comparison is the mean response distance for six species of homopterans (from Galatowitsch and Mumme 2004).

of Myioborus redstarts in different geographic regions would be required to test the prey-specific hypothesis and determine if geographic variation in insect prey could potentially lead to selection for diversification of Myioborus plumage pattern (Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.). A second hypothesis to explain why some taxa of redstarts have plumage patterns that would be maladaptive in Costa Rica is a habitat-specific hypothesis (Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.); geographic variation in habitat or environmental conditions may select for different plumage patterns that best exploit the fundamental properties of the visually mediated escape circuits of their insect prey. Under this hypothesis, geographic variation in the physical environment, not geographic variation in the insect prey, selects for diversification of plumage pattern (Marchetti 1993). Results of additional experiments described in Jabłon´ski et al. (unpubl. ms.) are consistent with the habitat-specific hypothesis. First, the background against which model redstarts are displayed significantly influences the effectiveness of particular plumage patterns in startling dipteran prey; models with relatively little white were more effective when displayed against relatively light backgrounds, whereas models portraying plumage patterns with more extensive white were more effective when displayed against darker backgrounds (Jabłon´ski et al., unpubl. ms.). Second, field experiments in relatively sunny pine-oak woodland in southern Arizona and relatively dark tropical montane forest in Costa Rica showed that muscid flies responded differentially to models of redstarts with varying degrees of white; as expected from the results of the background experiment, models with relatively less white were more effective in the open environments of Arizona,

whereas models with relatively more white were more effective in darker Costa Rican forests (Jabłon´ ski et al., unpubl. ms.). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation of neural escape circuitry among flies of the family Muscidae (Bacon and Strausfeld 1986; Milde and Strausfeld 1990; Jabłon´ski and Strausfeld 2001), it is unlikely that this difference in the response of muscid flies in Arizona and Costa Rica could be attributable to differences in the neural properties of the flies’ escape circuitry. Collectively, these results from Jabłon´ski et al. (unpubl. ms.) suggest that geographic variation in physical characteristics of the habitat and resulting variation in ambient light levels could select for diversification of Myioborus plumage patterns in different geographic regions. However, a definitive test of the habitatspecific hypothesis will require detailed studies of the physical environment of Myioborus redstarts throughout their range. Although we have rejected two of the hypotheses for geographic variation in Myioborus plumage patterns based on data from Costa Rica, it is important to note that these hypotheses may apply in other populations of Myioborus. For example, although our results are completely inconsistent with the evolutionary trade-offs hypothesis (Fig. 2B), it is possible that experimental addition of white to the tail of M. miniatus hellmayri from Guatemala could produce a significant enhancement of foraging performance. If this hypothetical result were realized, the challenge would then be to identify what evolutionary trade-offs (e.g., predation pressure) constrain the evolution of extensive patches of white in Northern Central America, and why such trade-offs are absent in Costa Rica.

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FIG. 6. Combined results of the effects of all experimental manipulations of tail pattern on flush-pursuit foraging efficiency, as measured by the percentage of hops in the spread-tail foraging posture that were followed by a prey attack. Data from 2000 derived from Mumme (2002). The thick horizontal bars and thin vertical bars designate the mean and standard error, respectively.

It is also possible that some of the geographic variation in the black-and-white plumage patterns of Myioborus redstarts is attributable to factors other than foraging performance, such as selection for enhanced social or sexual signaling in different environments (e.g., Marchetti 1993; Marchetti and Price 1997). However, we consider this possibility unlikely. In all Myioborus redstarts, males and females have identical plumage patterns, suggesting that sexual selection plays relatively little role in plumage evolution in the genus. Furthermore, during 10 months of daily fieldwork at our Monteverde study site during the nesting seasons of 2000–2004, we never observed slate-throated redstarts displaying their conspicuous tail patterns in a sexual context, either during pair formation or extrapair courtship. Similarly, although territorial disputes occur frequently in slate-throated redstarts, they are resolved by vocal displays (song) and aggressive chasing, not by stereotyped visual displays. In summary, we have no evidence that the contrasting black-and-white plumage patterns of Myioborus redstarts play any significant role in social or sexual signaling. The analysis and discussion presented in this paper is based on the assumption that geographic variation in the plumage pattern of Myioborus redstarts has an underlying genetic basis. We have not tested this assumption; a rigorous test would require rearing nestling redstarts from different taxa and geographic regions under uniform common garden conditions and would present considerable logistic difficulties. Regard-

less, the assumption that geographic variation in Myioborus plumage pattern is based on underlying genetic variation is almost certainly valid. First, significant genetic differentiation exists among populations of Myioborus redstarts, both interspecifically and within the geographically recognized subspecies of M. miniatus (Pe´rez-Ema´n 2002). Second, although diet and other environmental conditions can influence the development of plumage in birds (Slagsvold and Lifjeld 1985; Hill 1993; Birkhead et al. 1999; McGraw and Hill 2001), significant environmental effects are usually limited to either the deposition of carotenoid-based dietary pigments (Witmer 1996; Eeva et al. 1998; Hill 2000) or the size and intensity of melanin-based badges of social or sexual status (Rohwer 1975; Slagsvold and Lifjeld 1992; Veiga and Puerta 1996; Otter and Ratcliffe 1999). For species like Myioborus redstarts, in which melanin-based black-and-white plumage patterns do not show pronounced within-population variation and do not function as badges of status, diet and other environmental factors usually have little effect on the expression of plumage pattern (Hill 1993; Hill and Brawner 1998; McGraw and Hill 2000; Quinn et al. 2002). Although geographic variation in plumage pattern is extremely widespread in birds, in few cases is its evolutionary and adaptive significance well understood. In most species the selective pressures that influence plumage evolution are difficult to identify and measure, and much of the geographic variation in plumage pattern may be attributable to genetic

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drift rather than to natural selection. By focusing on geographic variation in the contrasting black-and-white tail feathers in a Myioborus redstart, a plumage character that is known to be a critical adaptation for successful flush-pursuit foraging, the experimental work described here has extended our understanding of the causes and consequences of geographic variation in avian plumage. Our results indicate that natural selection has shaped plumage evolution in the slatethroated redstart, and that geographic variation in plumage pattern may reflect adaptation to regional habitat characteristics that enhances flush-pursuit foraging performance. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We are grateful to M. Hidalgo of the Estacio´n Biolo´gica Monteverde (EBM) for housing and allowing us to work on EBM properties. L. Petell provided invaluable field assistance during 2002. Financial support was provided by the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society (grant 7194-02 to RLM), the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN grant 6PO4 063 21 to PGJ), the National Science Foundation (grant IBN0133874 to PGJ), and a fellowship from the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (to PGJ). MLG received additional support from Allegheny College through the Shanbrom Fund, made possible by a gift from E. and H. Shanbrom. For assistance and logistical support in Costa Rica, we thank C. Escheverria, W. Haber, S. Sargent, B. Young and W. Zuchowski. J. V. Remsen, M. Webster, and two anonymous reviewers provided constructive comments on the manuscript. LITERATURE CITED Aldrich, J. W., and F. C. James. 1991. Ecogeographic variation in the American robin (Turdus migratorius). Auk 108:230–249. Bacon, J. P., and N. J. Strausfeld. 1986. The dipteran ‘‘giant fibre’’ pathway: neurons and signals. J. Comp. Physiol. A 158:529–548. Bensch, S., T. Andersson, and S. Akesson. 1999. Morphological and molecular variation across a migratory divide in willow warblers, Phylloscopus trochilus. Evolution 53:1925–1935. Birkhead, T. R., F. Fletcher, and E. J. Pellatt. 1999. Nestling diet, secondary sexual traits and fitness in the zebra finch. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 266:385–390. Burtt, E. H., Jr. 1986. An analysis of physical, physiological, and optical aspects of avian coloration with emphasis on wood-warblers. Ornithol. Monogr. 38:1–126. Curson, J., D. Quinn, and D. Beadle. 1994. Warblers of the Americas: an identification guide. Houghton Mifflin, Boston, MA. Eeva, T., E. Lehikoinen, and M. Ronka. 1998. Air pollution fades the plumage of the great tit. Funct. Ecol. 12:607–612. Fisher, E. M., and H. A. Hespenheide. 1992. Taxonomy and biology of Central American robber flies with an illustrated key to genera (Diptera: Asilidae). Pp. 611–632 in D. Quintero and A. Aiello, eds. Insects of Panama and Mesoamerica: selected studies. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. Galatowitsch, M. L., and R. L. Mumme. 2004. Escape behavior of Neotropical homopterans in response to a flush-pursuit predator. Biotropica 36:586–595. Gould, S. J., and R. C. Lewontin. 1979. The spandrels of San Marco and the Panglossian paradigm: a critique of the adaptationist programme. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 205:581–598. Haber, W. A. 2000. Plants and vegetation. Pp. 39–94 in N. M. Nadkarni and N. T. Wheelwright, eds. Monteverde: ecology and conservation of a tropical cloud forest. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. Hill, G. E. 1993. Geographic variation in the carotenoid plumage

pigmentation of male house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus). Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 49:63–86. ———. 2000. Energetic constraints on expression of carotenoidbased plumage coloration. J. Avian Biol. 31:559–566. Hill, G. E., and W. R. Brawner III. 1998. Melanin-based plumage colouration in the house finch is unaffected by coccidial infection. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 265:1105–1109. Hughes, J. J., A. M. Baker, G. DeZylva, and P. B. Mather. 2001. A phylogeographic analysis of southern and eastern populations of the Australian magpie: evidence for selection in maintenance of the distribution of two plumage morphs. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 74:25–34. Jabłon´ski, P. G. 1999. A rare predator exploits prey escape behavior: the role of tail-fanning and plumage contrast in foraging of the painted redstart (Myioborus pictus). Behav. Ecol. 10:7–14. ———. 2001. Sensory exploitation of prey: manipulation of the initial direction of prey escapes by a conspicuous ‘‘rare enemy.’’ Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 268:1017–1022. Jabłon´ski, P. G., and N. J. Strausfeld. 2000. Exploitation by a recent avian predator of an ancient arthropod escape circuit: prey sensitivity and elements of the displays by predators. Brain Behav. Evol. 56:94–106. ———. 2001. Exploitation of an ancient escape circuit by an avian predator: relationships between taxon-specific prey escape circuits and the sensitivity to visual cues from the predator. Brain Behav. Evol. 58:218–240. James, F. C. 1991. Complementary descriptive and experimental studies of clinal variation in birds. Am. Zool. 31:694–706. Marchetti, K. 1993. Dark habitats and bright birds illustrate the role of the environment in species divergence. Nature 362:149–152. Marchetti, K., and T. Price. 1997. The adaptive significance of colour patterns in the Old World leaf warblers, genus Phylloscopus. Oikos 79:410–412. Mayr, E. 1942. Systematics and the origin of species. Columbia Univ. Press, New York. ———. 1963. Animal species and evolution. Harvard Univ. Press, Cambridge, MA. Mayr, E., and J. M. Diamond. 2001. Birds of northern Melanesia: speciation, ecology and biogeography. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. McGraw, K. J., and G. E. Hill. 2000. Differential effects of endoparasitism on the expression of carotenoid- and melanin-based ornamental coloration. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 267:1525–1531. ———. 2001. Carotenoid access and intraspecific variation in plumage pigmentation in male American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis) and northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis). Funct. Ecol. 15:732–739. Milde, J. J., and N. J. Strausfeld. 1990. Cluster organization and response characteristics of the giant fiber pathway of the blowfly Calliphora erythrocephala. J. Comp. Neurol. 294:59–75. Mumme, R. L. 2002. Scare tactics in a Neotropical warbler: white tail feathers enhance flush pursuit foraging performance in the slate-throated redstart (Myioborus miniatus). Auk 119: 1024–1035. Nadkarni, N. M., and N. T. Wheelwright. 2000. Monteverde: ecology and conservation of a tropical cloud forest. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. Ott, R. L. 1993. An introduction to statistical methods and data analysis. 4th ed. Duxbury Press, Belmont, CA. Otter, K., and L. Ratcliffe. 1999. Relationship of bib size to age and sex in the black-capped chickadee. J. Field Ornithol. 70: 567–577. Paynter, R. A., Jr., ed. 1968. Check-list of birds of the world: Vol. 14. Hefferman Press, Worcester, MA. Pe´rez-Ema´n, J. L. 2002. Molecular systematics, biogeography, and population history of the genus Myioborus (Aves, Parulinae). Ph.D. diss. University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO. Pigliucci, M., and J. Kaplan. 2000. The fall and rise of Dr Pangloss: adaptationism and the Spandrels paper 20 years later. Trends Ecol. Evol. 15:66–70. Price, T., and M. Pavelka. 1996. Evolution of a colour pattern: history, development, and selection. J. Evol. Biol. 9:451–470. Quinn, M. J., J. B. French, F. M. A. McNabb, and M. A. Ottinger.

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evolutionary significance of geographic variation in a ... - BioOne

3E-mail: [email protected] 4Centre for Ecological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 05-092 Łomianki, Dziekanów Lesny, Poland. 5University of Arizona, Arizona Research Laboratories Division of Neurobiology, 611 Gould-Simpson Building, Tucson, Arizona. 85721. 6E-mail: [email protected]edu.

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