IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 21, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2006

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Efficient Computation of Multivariable Transfer Function Dominant Poles Using Subspace Acceleration Joost Rommes and Nelson Martins, Fellow, IEEE

Abstract—This paper describes a new algorithm to compute the dominant poles of a high-order multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transfer function. The algorithm, called the Subspace Accelerated MIMO Dominant Pole Algorithm (SAMDP), is able to compute the full set of dominant poles efficiently. SAMDP can be used to produce good modal equivalents automatically. The general algorithm is robust, applicable to both square and nonsquare transfer function matrices, and can easily be tuned to suit different practical system needs. Index Terms—Dominant pole spectrum, large-scale systems, modal analysis, modal equivalents, model reduction, multivariable systems, poorly damped oscillations, power system dynamics, small-signal stability, sparse eigenanalysis, system poles, transfer function, transfer function residues.

I. INTRODUCTION URRENT model reduction techniques for power system stability analysis and controller design [1]–[5] produce good results but are either not applicable or require excessive computational effort to deal with large-scale problems. If only a small part of the system pole spectrum is controllableobservable for the transfer function, a low-cost alternative for large-scale systems is modal model reduction. Modal reduction approximates the transfer function by a modal equivalent that is computed from the dominant poles and their corresponding residues. To produce a good modal equivalent, specialized eigensolution methods are needed. An algorithm that automatically and efficiently computes the full set of dominant poles of a scalar transfer function was presented recently [6], but existing methods for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transfer functions [7] are not capable enough to produce good modal equivalents automatically. A survey on model reduction methods employing either singular value decompositions or moment matching-based methods is found in [8] and [9]. Practically all examples provided in [9], a recent and valuable reference of model reduction of multivariable systems, have less than 1000 states. An introduction on modal model reduction on state space models can be found in [10], while [11] describes a possible enhancement to modal model reduction. However, the authors believe that modal model reduction has been largely

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Manuscript received January 10, 2006; revised April 26, 2006. Paper no. TPWRS-00016-2006. J. Rommes is with the Mathematical Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands (e-mail: [email protected]). N. Martins is with CEPEL, Rio de Janeiro, RJ-20001-970, Brazil (e-mail: [email protected]). Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/TPWRS.2006.881154

neglected (see [9], for example) by the engineering community, mostly due to the lack of reliable eigensolution algorithms. In this paper, a new extension of the Subspace Accelerated Dominant Pole Algorithm (SADPA) [6] will be proposed: Subspace Accelerated MIMO Dominant Pole Algorithm (SAMDP). The SADPA is a generalization of the Dominant Pole Algorithm [12], which automatically computes a high-quality modal equivalent of a transfer function. The SAMDP can also be seen as a generalization of the MIMO dominant pole algorithm [7]. SAMDP computes the dominant poles and corresponding residue matrices one by one by selecting the most dominant approximation every iteration. This approach leads to a faster, more robust, and more flexible algorithm. To avoid repeated computation of the same dominant poles, a deflation strategy is used. The SAMDP directly operates on implicit state space systems, also known as descriptor systems, which are very sparse in practical power system applications. This paper is organized as follows. Section II summarizes some well-known properties of MIMO transfer functions and formulates the problem of computing the dominant poles of a MIMO transfer function. Section III describes the new SAMDP algorithm. In Section IV, numerical aspects concerning practical implementations of SAMDP are discussed. Extensive numerical results are presented in Section V. Section VI concludes. II. MIMO TRANSFER FUNCTIONS, SIGMA PLOTS, AND DOMINANT POLES For a MIMO system (1) where ,

, , and is defined as

,

, , , the transfer function

(2) is the identity matrix and . Without loss where of generality, in the following. It is well known that the transfer function of a single-input single-output (SISO) system is defined by a complex number for any frequency. For a MIMO system, the transfer function matrix and hence does not have a unique gain for a is a given frequency. The SISO concept of a single transfer function

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gain must be replaced by a range of gains that have an upper and both upper and lower bound for nonsquare matrices . Denoting the smallest and bounds for square matrices largest singular values [13] of by and , that it follows for square

i.e., for a given frequency , the gain of a MIMO transfer function is between the smallest and largest singular value of , which are also called the smallest and largest principal gains , only the upper [14]. For nonsquare transfer functions bound holds. Plots of the smallest and largest principal gains against frequency, also known as sigma plots, are used in the robust control design and analysis of MIMO systems [14]. Let the eigenvalues (poles) of and the corresponding right , and and left eigenvectors be given by the triplets let the right and left eigenvectors be scaled so that . for . The transfer function can Note that over be expressed as a sum of residue matrices first-order poles [15]

where the residue matrices

are

III. SUBSPACE ACCELERATED MIMO DOMINANT POLE ALGORITHM (SAMDP) The subspace accelerated MIMO dominant pole algorithm (SAMDP) is based on the dominant pole algorithm (DPA) [12], the subspace accelerated DPA (SADPA) [6], and the MIMO dominant pole algorithm (MDP) [7]. First, a Newton scheme will be derived for computing the dominant poles of a MIMO transfer function. Then, the SAMDP will be formulated as an accelerated Newton scheme, using the same improvements that were used in the robust SADPA algorithm. All algorithms are described as directly operating on the state space model. The practical implementations (see Section IV-A) operate on the sparse descriptor system model, which is the unreduced Jacobian for the power system stability problem, analyzed in the examples of this paper (see Section V). Matlab implementations of the algorithms are presented in the Appendix.

A. Newton Scheme for Computing Dominant Poles The dominant poles of a MIMO transfer function are those for which . , there is an equivFor square transfer functions for alent criterion: the dominant poles are those . In the following, it will be aswhich sumed that ; for general MIMO transfer functions, see Section IV-C. for which The Newton method can be used to find the the objective function (3)

A pole

that corresponds to a residue with large norm is called a dominant pole, i.e., a pole that is well observable and controllable in the transfer function. This can also be observed from the corre-plot of , where peaks occur at frequencies sponding close to the imaginary parts of the dominant poles of . that consists of terms with An approximation of above some value determines the effective transfer function behavior [16] and will be referred to as transfer function modal equivalent

is zero. Let , i.e., , with by [18]

be an eigentriplet of and . The derivative of

is given

(4) where

(5) Because a residue matrix is the product of a column vector and a row vector, it is of unit rank. Therefore, at least different poles are needed to obtain a modal equivalent with plot [7], [17]. nonzero The problem of concern can now be formulated as follows: Given a MIMO linear, time invariant, dynamical system , compute dominant poles and the and . corresponding right and left eigenvectors

Note that it is assumed that that the function that selects tuting (5) in (4), it follows that

has distinct eigenvalues and has derivative 1. Substi-

ROMMES AND MARTINS: EFFICIENT COMPUTATION OF MULTIVARIABLE TRANSFER FUNCTION DOMINANT POLES

The Newton scheme then becomes

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B. SAMDP as an Accelerated Newton Scheme The three strategies that are used for SADPA [6] are also used to make SAMDP, a generalization of Alg. 1 that is able to compute more than one dominant pole: subspace acceleration, selection of most dominant approximation, and deflation. A global overview of the SAMDP is shown in Alg. 2. Each of the three strategies is explained in the following paragraphs.

where is the corresponding to . An eigentriplet of algorithm, very similar to the DPA algorithm [12], for the computation of single dominant pole of a MIMO transfer function using the above Newton scheme is shown in Alg. 1. Note that this algorithm is easier to recognize as a Newton scheme than the MDP presented in [7], which is conceptually the same. In the neighborhood of a solution, Alg. 1 converges quadratically.

Algorithm 1: A MIMO Dominant Pole Algorithm (MDP) INPUT: System

, initial pole estimate

Solve

INPUT: System number of wanted poles

OUTPUT: Dominant pole triplets . 1) , , 2) while do 3) Compute eigentriplet 4) Solve from

5)

6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11)

from

, initial pole estimate .

, and the

,

of

.

OUTPUT: Dominant pole and corresponding right and left eigenvectors and . 1) Set 2) while not converged do of 3) Compute eigentriplet 4) Solve from

5)

Algorithm 2: Subspace Accelerated MDP Algorithm

Solve

from

Expand Expand Compute

{Alg. 4} {Alg. 4} and Sort

if

{Alg. 3} then {Alg. 5}

6)

Compute the new pole estimate

7)

The pole

for some 8) Set 9) end while

has converged if

12) 13) Set 14) end if 15) Set the new pole estimate 16) Set 17) end while

1) Subspace Acceleration: The approximations and that are computed in steps 4 and 5 of Alg. 1 are kept in orthogonal search spaces and , using modified Gram–Schmidt (MGS) [13]. These search spaces grow every iteration and will contain better approximations (see steps 6 and 7 of Alg. 2). 2) Selection Strategy: Every iteration, a new pole estimate must be chosen. There are several strategies (see [6] and Section IV-B). Here the most natural choice is to select the with largest residue norm . triplet . See Alg. 3. SAMDP continues with

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Algorithm 3 INPUT: .

Sort

Algorithm 5 Deflate

,

,

, ,

INPUT:

OUTPUT: , with the pole and the with largest residue matrix norm and corresponding approximate right and left eigenvectors. 1) Compute eigentriplets of

2) Compute approximate eigentriplets of

3) 4) 5) 6) Compute residue matrices 7) Sort , , in decreasing

as

order

3) Deflation: An eigentriplet has converged if is smaller than some tolerance . If more than one eigentriplet is wanted, repeated computation of already converged eigentriplets must be avoided. This can be achieved by using deflation [19], [20]. and are found, If the exact right and left eigenvectors then it can be verified that the matrix

,

,

,

. OUTPUT: , , if has zero imaginary part and where has nonzero imaginary part. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) if then 6) {Also deflate complex conjugate} 7) 8) 9) 10) 11) end if 12) 13) for do Expand 14) 15) Expand 16) end for

, if

IV. PRACTICAL IMPLEMENTATIONS OF SAMDP In this section, aspects concerning practical implementations of SAMDP and the generalization of SAMDP to nonsquare are discussed. MIMO transfer functions A. Sparse Descriptor System Models The sparse descriptor system formulation of (1) becomes

has the same eigentriplets as but with the found eigenvalues transformed to zero. needs to be orthogonally expanded Using this, the space and similarly, the space needs with to orthogonally expanded with . These projections are implemented using MGS (see Alg. 4). Algorithm 4 INPUT: . OUTPUT:

Expand with

, with

where

, , , , , , , and is a diagonal matrix with diagonal elements either 0 or 1. The coris defined responding transfer function as

, and

. 1) 2) 3) If a complex pole has converged, its complex conjugate is also a pole, and the corresponding complex conjugate right and left eigenvectors can also be deflated. A complex conjugated pair is counted as one pole. The complete deflation procedure is shown in Alg. 5.

where . Without loss of generality, in the following. The algorithms presented in this paper can easily be adapted to handle sparse descriptor systems. The changes essentially boil down to replacing by on most places and noting that for , the relation , holds. eigentriplets For completeness, the changes are given for each algorithm. • Algorithm 1: — Replace by in steps 4 and 5. — Step 6 becomes

ROMMES AND MARTINS: EFFICIENT COMPUTATION OF MULTIVARIABLE TRANSFER FUNCTION DOMINANT POLES

— The criterion in step 7 becomes

• Algorithm 2: — Replace by in steps 4 and 5. — Replace steps 6 and 7 by Expand Expand — In step 8, use . — The criterion in step 10 becomes

• Algorithm 5: — Replace steps 14 and 15 by Expand Expand All the experiments described in this paper were done using implementations that operate on the sparse descriptor system model. The algorithm can readily be extended to handle general descriptor system transfer functions , with , as well. B. Computational Optimizations If a large number of dominant poles is wanted, the search spaces and may become very large. By imposing a cerfor the search spaces, this can tain maximum dimension and reaches , be controlled: when the dimension of they are reduced to dimension by keeping the most dominant approximate eigentriplets. The process is and , a concept known as imrestarted with the reduced plicit restarting [6], [19]. This procedure is continued until all poles are found. The systems in steps 4 and 5 of Alg. 2 can be solved with the -factorization of , by using and in step 4 same and in step 5. Because in practice the sparse Jacobian and is used, computation of the -factorization is inexpensive. of In step 3 of Alg. 2, the eigentriplet must be computed. This triplet can be computed with inverse iteration [19] or, by noting that this eigentriplet corresponds to the of , with , with the eigentriplet . Note that there is no need power method [19] applied to explicitly. However, if the number of states of to compute the system is large, and the number of inputs/outputs of matrix is large as well, applying the power or inverse iteration methods at every iteration may be expensive. It may then be more efficient to only compute a new eigentriplet after a dominant pole has been found or once every restart. As more eigentriplets have converged, approximations of new eigentriplets may become poorer due to rounding errors in the orthogonalization phase and the already converged eigentriplets. It is therefore advised to take a small tolerance . Besides that, if the residual for the current approx, one or more imation drops below a certain tolerance

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iterations may be saved by using generalized Rayleigh quotient iteration [21] to let the residual drop below . In practice, a is safe enough to avoid convergence tolerance to less-dominant poles. Closely spaced poles and repeated poles are not a problem for SAMDP, although convergence to defective poles may be only linear (see also [21]). The SAMDP requires a single initial shift, even if more than one dominant pole is wanted, because the selection strategy automatically provides a new shift once a pole has converged. On the other hand, if one has special knowledge of the transfer function, for instance, the approximate location of dominant poles, this information can be used by providing additional shifts to SAMDP. These shifts can then be used to accelerate the process of finding dominant poles. Although the location of the initial shift may influence the order in which the dominant poles are found, the new shifts provided by the selection strategy are helpful in computing poles located away from the initial shift, and hence, the quality of the modal equivalent is not much influenced by the initial shift. As is also mentioned in [6], one can easily change the selection strategy to use any of the existing indexes of modal dominance [10], [22]. The procedure can be automated even further for by providing the desired maximum error a suitable norm and frequency range: the procedure continues computing new poles until the error bound is reached. Note that such an error bound requires that the transfer function of the (which is usucomplete model is known for a range of ally the case for sparse descriptor systems). C. General MIMO Transfer Functions For a general nonsquare transfer function , the objective function (3) cannot be used, because the eigendecomposition is only defined for square matrices. However, the singular value decomposition is defined for nonsquare matrices, and hence, the objective function becomes (6) Let

be a singular triplet of , i.e., and . , so the objective It follows that function (6) can also be written as (7) with

. Because in (7) is a function from , the derivative is not injective. A complex can be represented by . The scalar partial derivatives of the objective function (7) become

where

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The derivative of (7) then becomes

where is

and

TABLE I RESULTS OF SAMDP FOR THE 8 8, 28 28, 8 6, AND 28 TRANSFER FUNCTIONS OF BIPS. SHIFT s = 0:1i

2

2

2

2 25

. The Newton scheme

where denotes the pseudo-inverse of a mawith rank [13]. trix This Newton scheme can be proved to have superlinear convergence locally. Because the SAMDP uses subspace acceleration, which accelerates the search for new directions, and relies on Rayleigh quotient iteration for nearly converged eigentriplets, it is expected that performance for square and nonsquare systems will be equally good, as is also confirmed by experiments. V. NUMERICAL RESULTS The algorithm was tested on a number of systems, for a number of different input and output matrices and . Here the results for the Brazilian Interconnected Power System (BIPS) are shown. The BIPS data correspond to a year 1999 planning model, having 2370 buses, 3401 lines, 123 synchronous machines plus field excitation and speed-governor controls, 46 power system stabilizers, four static var compensators, two TCSCs equipped with oscillation damping controllers, and one large HVDC link. Each generator and associated controls is the aggregate model of a whole power plant. The BIPS model is linearized about an operating point having a total load of 46 000 MW, with the North-Northeast generators exporting 1000 MW to the South-Southeast Region, through the planned 500 kV, series-compensated North-South intertie. The state space realization of the BIPS model has 1664 states, and the sparse, unreduced Jacobian has dimension 13 251. The sparse Jacobian structure and the full eigenvalue spectrum, for this 1664-state BIPS model, are pictured in [7]. Like the experiments in [6] and [7], the practical implementation operates on the sparse unreduced Jacobian of the system, instead of on the dense state matrix . In the experiments, the convergence tolerance used was . The spaces and were limited to size ( , ). New orientation vectors and corresponding (see step 3 in Alg. 2) were only computed after a pole to had converged. In every iteration, the approximation with largest residue norm was selected. All experiments were carried out in Matlab 6.5 [23] on an Intel Centrino Pentium 1.5 GHz with 512 MB RAM. To demonstrate the performance of SAMDP, it was applied to two square transfer functions and two nonsquare transfer functions of BIPS to compute a number of dominant poles (complex conjugate pairs are counted as one pole). Table I shows the statistics of SAMDP for the transfer functions. The eigenvalue

Fig. 1. Pole spectrum of the 184th-order modal equivalent of the 8 function.

2 8 transfer

Fig. 2. Pole spectrum of the 291st-order modal equivalent of the 28 transfer function.

2 28

spectrum of the 8 8 MIMO modal equivalent, whose sigma plots are given in Fig. 3, is pictured in Fig. 1. The eigenvalue spectrum of the 28 28 MIMO modal equivalent, whose sigma plot is given in Fig. 6, is pictured in Fig. 2. SAMDP is able to automatically compute a modal equiv8 transfer function of acceptable size that alent for the 8 and curves rather well, as shown captures both the in the sigma plots in Figs. 3 and 4. Increasing the number of . The 8 8 states also reduces the error

ROMMES AND MARTINS: EFFICIENT COMPUTATION OF MULTIVARIABLE TRANSFER FUNCTION DOMINANT POLES

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Fig. 3. Sigma plot of modal equivalent and complete model and error for the 8 8 Brazilian system transfer function (1664 states in the complete model, 184 in the reduced model).

2

Fig. 5. Sigma plot of modal equivalent and complete model and error for the 28 28 Brazilian system transfer function (1664 states in the complete model, 248 in the reduced model).

Fig. 4. Sigma plot of modal equivalent and complete model and error for the 8 8 Brazilian system transfer function (1664 states in the complete model, 294 in the reduced model).

2

Fig. 6. Sigma plot of modal equivalent and complete model and error for the 28 28 Brazilian system transfer function (1664 states in the complete model, 291 in the reduced model).

transfer function is taken from [7], where a fairly low performance modal equivalent, having 39 states, was obtained through repeated MDP runs, in a procedure that required considerable human interaction. The SAMDP automatically computes all the poles in one run. The reader is referred to [7] for more practical details on this 8 8 power system transfer function and a complete list of the 39 dominant poles. The second example is a 28 28 transfer function of the BIPS model. Here one is in particular interested in a good fitting of curve over the to 2 Hz range, as this indicates all the major electromechanical modes have been captured, revealing its potential value for applications in the damping analysis and is control of power system oscillations. Matrix comprised of mechanical power input disturbance vectors for 28

generators, while is comprised of output row vectors for the rotor speed deviations of the same generators. These 28 generators were selected for being of large size and also located in strategic parts of the BIPS, so that the MIMO function has good observability/controllability of the major system electromechanical modes. From Figs. 5 and 6, it can be ob-curve served that the SAMDP is able to approximate the well, while it has more difficulties in approximating the curve: many more poles would be needed for a good fitting of -curve. the Figs. 7 and 8 show the sigma plots for the nonsquare 8 6 and 28 25 transfer functions, which were obtained by truncating the last columns of of the 8 8 and 28 28 transfer functions, respectively. The results confirm that SAMDP is also

2

2

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less-known subject for multivariable systems [24]–[26]. Dominant zeros for transfer function matrices may be computed by a Newton scheme very similar to Alg. 1. Generalizations to nonsquare transfer functions are under current investigation. Further reduced system models, if needed for advanced control applications, may be obtained by applying the balanced model reduction algorithm [10] to a state space realization of the modal equivalent, after having used the SAMDP algorithm to produce this modal equivalent for a large-scale system. VI. CONCLUSIONS

Fig. 7. Sigma plot of modal equivalent and complete model and error for the 8 6 Brazilian system transfer function (1664 states in the complete model, 240 in the reduced model).

2

The SAMDP algorithm is a fast and robust method to compute dominant poles and corresponding residue matrices of both square and nonsquare MIMO transfer functions. The algorithm is a variant of the SADPA [6] and has several advantages compared to existing methods: a natural selection method is used to converge to both real and complex dominant poles, subspace acceleration accelerates the algorithm and provides new pole estimates, and deflation techniques prevent the algorithm from (re-)computing already found poles. Finally, SAMDP is completely automatic: with a single shift, it is able to compute as many dominant poles as wanted, without intermediate human interaction. This paper’s results are related to the analysis and control of small signal stability, but the SAMDP algorithm is general and could be effectively applied to problems in other engineering fields that allow sparse descriptor system formulations. It can easily be adjusted to take advantage of specific properties or knowledge of the system. APPENDIX MATLAB IMPLEMENTATION In this Appendix, Matlab codes for the algorithms for sparse descriptor systems, as described in the text, are given. The algorithm Deflate (Alg. 5) is integrated in the SAMDP algorithm. MIMO DPA

Fig. 8. Sigma plot of modal equivalent and complete model and error for the 28 25 Brazilian system transfer function (1664 states in the complete model, 287 in the reduced model).

function

2

size

;

size

;

;

square if

applicable to nonsquare transfer functions, with comparable performance. It must be noted that all modal equivalents in this section are automatically computed by SAMDP, without human interaction. The relatively small two-norm of the error function indicates the zeros are also preserved, although not ex-plots are related to plicitly computed by the algorithm. The the location of the transmission zeros, as experimentally verified -plot over a given freby the authors. A good fitting of the quency range indicates that the zeros located within this range are preserved in the modal equivalent. Numerically, however, -curves are difficult to approximate, due to the low magthe values. nitude of the Transfer function zeros give a measure of the controllability of the system and have also other applications but are a

square

;

end ;

;

;

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for if ; ; ; ; if square_sys ; ; ; else

;

ROMMES AND MARTINS: EFFICIENT COMPUTATION OF MULTIVARIABLE TRANSFER FUNCTION DOMINANT POLES

'

' '

; '

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%fixed singular vectors ;

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SAMDP

; ;

function Expand % Computes the dominant poles of

,

;

Expand

;

% using the Subspace Accelerated MIMO Dominant Pole Algorithm.

;

% This algorithm operates on the sparse Jacobian A.

;

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%

;

% Input:

Sort

%

A, E: (nxn) matrix

%

B: (nxm) matrix

size

;

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;

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%

C: (nxp) matrix

%

D: (mxm) direct term of system

%

s0: initial estimate for pole

%

options: struct with

%

nwanted: number of wanted poles (5)

%

tol: tolerance for eigenpair residual (1e-10)

%

displ: show convergence information (1)

%

kmin: minimal searchspace dimension (min(1,n))

%

kmax: maximal searchspace dimension (min(10,n))

%

maxrestart: maximal nr of restarts (100)

while found ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; if

;

& do_rqi

% % Output: %

poles: converged poles

%

residues: residues needed to construct bode plot

%

leftev: left eigenvectors

%

rightev: right eigenvectors

%

nr_solves: number of LU factorizations used

; ; end ; ;

if found

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; ;

Expand

;

; ; ;

Expand

;

; ;

end

;

end ;

end

;

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%in case of real pole, do reortho. If a complex pair

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ROMMES AND MARTINS: EFFICIENT COMPUTATION OF MULTIVARIABLE TRANSFER FUNCTION DOMINANT POLES

;

if ;

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% Modified Gram-Schmidt

: length(poles)

for

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end

; ;

; ;

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if isfield(options, ‘nwanted’)

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ACKNOWLEDGMENT ;

The authors would like to thank the reviewers for the valuable suggestions. They would also like to thank CEPEL and ELETROBRAS for providing the test systems.

end if isfield(options, ‘kmin’) ; end

REFERENCES

if isfield(options, ‘kmax’) ; end if isfield(options, ‘maxrestarts’) ; end if isfield(options, ‘tol’) %Ritz pair tolerance ; else ; end if isfield(options, ‘displ’) %show convergence info ; else ; end Sort function

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% compute and sort the eigendecomps ;

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;

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[1] J. J. Sanchez-Gasca and J. H. Chow, “Power system reduction to simplify the design of damping controllers for interarea oscillations,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 1342–1349, Aug. 1996. [2] B. C. Pal, A. H. Coonick, and B. J. Cory, “Robust damping of inter-area oscillations in power systems with superconducting magnetic energy storage devices,” Proc. Inst. Elect. Eng., Gen., Transm., Distrib., vol. 146, no. 6, pp. 633–639, Nov. 1999. [3] D. Chaniotis and M. A. Pai, “Model reduction in power systems using Krylov subspace methods,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 888–894, May 2005. [4] A. Ramirez, A. Semlyen, and R. Iravani, “Order reduction of the dynamic model of a linear weakly periodic system—part I: general methodology,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 857–865, May 2004. [5] G. Troullinos, J. Dorsey, H. Wong, and J. Myers, “Reducing the order of very large power system models,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 127–133, Feb. 1988. [6] J. Rommes and N. Martins, “Efficient computation of transfer function dominant poles using subspace acceleration,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 1218–1226, Aug. 2006. [7] N. Martins and P. E. M. Quintão, “Computing dominant poles of power system multivariable transfer functions,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 152–159, Feb. 2003. [8] A. C. Antoulas and D. C. Sorensen, “Approximation of large-scale dynamical systems: an overview,” Int. J. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci., vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 1093–1121, 2001. [9] A. C. Antoulas, Approximation of Large-Scale Dynamical Systems. Philadelphia, PA: SIAM, 2005. [10] M. Green and D. J. N. Limebeer, Linear Robust Control. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1995. [11] A. Varga, “Enhanced modal approach for model reduction,” Math. Mod. Syst., no. 1, pp. 91–105, 1995. [12] N. Martins, L. T. G. Lima, and H. J. C. P. Pinto, “Computing dominant poles of power system transfer functions,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 162–170, Feb. 1996. [13] G. H. Golub and C. F. van Loan, Matrix Computations, 3rd ed. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1996. [14] J. M. Maciejowski, Multivariable Feedback Design. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1989. [15] T. Kailath, Linear Systems. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1980. [16] J. R. Smith, J. F. Hauer, D. J. Trudnowski, F. Fatehi, and C. S. Woods, “Transfer function identification in power system application,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 1282–1290, Aug. 1993. [17] R. V. Patel and N. Munro, Multivariable System Theory and Design. New York: Pergamon, 1982. [18] D. V. Murthy and R. T. Haftka, “Derivatives of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a general complex matrix,” Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng., vol. 26, pp. 293–311, 1988. [19] Y. Saad, Numerical Methods for Large Eigenvalue Problems: Theory and Algorithms. Manchester, U.K.: Manchester Univ. Press, 1992. [20] B. N. Parlett, The Symmetric Eigenvalue Problem. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1980. [21] ——, “The Rayleigh quotient iteration and some generalizations for nonnormal matrices,” Math. Comput., vol. 28, no. 127, pp. 679–693, Jul. 1974. [22] L. A. Aguirre, “Quantitative measure of modal dominance for continuous systems,” in Proc. 32nd Conf. Decision Control, Dec. 1993, pp. 2405–2410. [23] The Mathworks, Inc., Matlab R13. [Online]. Available: http://www. mathworks.com. [24] A. Emami-Naeni and P. Van Dooren, “Computation of zeros of linear multivariable systems,” Automatica, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 415–430, 1982. [25] N. Martins, H. J. C. P. Pinto, and L. T. G. Lima, “Efficient methods for finding transfer function zeros of power systems,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 1350–1361, Aug. 1992. [26] J. H. Chow and J. J. Sanchez-Gasca, “Power system damping controller design using multiple input signals,” Control Syst. Mag., vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 82–90, Aug. 2000.

ROMMES AND MARTINS: EFFICIENT COMPUTATION OF MULTIVARIABLE TRANSFER FUNCTION DOMINANT POLES

Joost Rommes received the M.Sc. degree in computational science and the M.Sc. degree in computer science from Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands, in 2002 and 2003, respectively. He is pursuing the Ph.D. degree at Utrecht University, working on model reduction.

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Nelson Martins (SM’91–F’98) received the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil, in 1972 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Manchester, U.K., in 1974 and 1978, respectively. He has been with CEPEL, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, since 1978 in the development of computer tools for power system dynamics and control.

Efficient Computation of Multivariable Transfer Function ...

ROMMES AND MARTINS: EFFICIENT COMPUTATION OF MULTIVARIABLE TRANSFER FUNCTION DOMINANT POLES. 1473. The Newton scheme then becomes where is the eigentriplet of corresponding to . An algorithm, very similar to the DPA algorithm [12], for the com- putation of single dominant pole of a MIMO ...

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