Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

n

tio

Espi Mai is Stuck Again! ...and other Goan tales

Illustrations by Alexyz

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

By Anita Pinto

2011

© Anita Pinto, 2011 [email protected] 9326013227 B-6, Feira Alta Apts, Altinho, Mapusa, Goa 403507 India

sl a

tio

n

What the others say: Lovely tales for children with typical, rustic characters and colourful illustrations. The narrative takes the reader from one Goan village to another. – Other India Bookstore, on Anita Pinto’s Tales from Golden Goa.

tr

an

Published in 2011 by

gu

es

e

Saligão 403511 Goa, India. http://goa1556.goa-india.org, [email protected] +91-832-2409490

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

Project coordination by Frederick Noronha. Cover design by Bina Nayak http://www.binanayak.com. Printed and bound in India by Rama Harmalkar, 9326102225 Special thanks: Victor Rangel-Ribeiro, Augusto Pinto, Eulalia Alvares Typeset in LYX www.lyx.org. Text in New Century Schoolbook 14 pts.

py

This book has been published under the scheme for financial assistance

ft

co

to writers, of the Directorate of Arts & Culture, Government of Goa.

D

ra

ISBN: 978-93-80739-27-4

Price: Rs. 150 in India.

n tio tr

an

sl a

Contents

Po r

2 Fix-It Fareeda

tu

gu

1 Masu, the Unhappy Fish

es

e

Foreword

fo

r

3 A Leopard Comes to Dinner

py

::

4 Espi Mai is Stuck Again!

vi 1 6 11 20 28

6 Devika Duck is Barking!

30

ra

ft

co

5 From Delhi to Goa

41

D

7 The Lace Maker

iii

49

9 What’s in a Name?

57

n

8 Mummy, Who Put the Baby...

68

sl a

tio

10 Holfsky Polfsky Comes to Goa

an

11 On Your Mark... Get Set... Go!

e

tr

13 Ciné Magic

gu

es

16 The Rose Garden

tu

15 The Buffalo and the Bird

Po r

17 What will People Say!

71 79 87 94 96 106

19 Silence in the Classroom

114

py

::

fo

r

18 Where is that Puppy Going?

ft

co

20 Yakira Finds Another Home

D

ra

21 Oh Goa, I Tried to Paint a Rainy Day For parents and teachers

122 131 134

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Nia & Elijah

D

n

tio

For my darling grandchildren

n tio sl a

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

To the Young Reader

I can see you are holding this book in your hands, I’m going to ask you a question: What kind of reader are you?

Po r

fo

r

N

OW THAT

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

I know young readers who like to read in company; they curl up next to someone who is already reading – their father or mother, a brother or sister, or just a special friend – and then begin to read a book of their own. Do you do that? And then there are the others who like to read alone. They lie flat on their stomachs on a mat or on a bed,

Foreword

an

sl a

tio

n

propping themselves up on both elbows, their chin, their nose, and their eyes just inches above the book that lies open before them. Others lie flat on their backs, holding the book up in the air, just above their face. Still others like to read a book while sitting. Do you like to be sitting or lying down while you read?

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

Actually, it really does not matter. What is important is that you should read a book at every chance you get. Read these stories from front to last, in that order, or read them in any order you like. When you’ve finished reading all of them, read them one by one all over again. You’ll be surprised at how much more you will enjoy a story when you are reading it for the second, third or fourth time.

Victor Rangel-Ribeiro Monroe, New Jersey, USA

ra

ft

co

py

::

Try it. Happy reading!

D

Writer and editor Victor Rangel-Ribeiro is the author of the novel Tivolem, set in Goa, the short story collection, Loving Ayesha, and several other works. He spends his time between his home in the United States and his ancestral home in old Porvorim.

vii

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

n tio

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Masu, the Unhappy Fish

G OA coast, where the water is silvery blue, there lived a little shoal of red-tailed fish in a small cove. The fish were very happy. The sun was warm and they had plenty of food – seaweeds and small worms.

Po r

py

::

fo

r

O

FF THE

D

ra

ft

co

But Masu, a little baby fish, was never happy. He watched the children on the beach who built sand castles, played football and ate roasted corn. Sometimes an ice-cream man came with a box and rang a tinkly bell. “I want to live on land,” Masu told

Masu, the Unhappy Fish

n

his mama. “The people who live on land are always having fun. And they never fear big fish that might eat them up for dinner.”

an

sl a

tio

“Masu, you cannot live on land,” said Mama Fish. “Your body is made to breathe only in water. Besides, are you sure you’ll be safe on land?”

es

e

tr

“Of course I will, Mama,” he said and swam away to play with his friends.

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

The next day, a little boy called Anuj came with a small codso* to play on the beach. He went into the water hoping to catch some fish. Of course, everyone knows you can’t catch fish with a codso. But Anuj was only five years old and he didn’t know that you needed a net or rod to catch fish.

ft

co

py

As he waded in the water, Masu saw him. “Here is my chance to go on land,” thought Masu. So in he swam, right into Anuj’s nice brown codso.

D

ra

“I caught a fish! I caught a fish!” cried Anuj. * codso

or kouso = a round pot used to carry water

2

Masu, the Unhappy Fish

n

His older sister Roopali looked up, said “Ha!” and continued making designs in the sand with coconut shells and her fingers.

tio

But Anuj ran to her: “Look! Look! I caught a fish!”

tr

an

sl a

Roopali looked into the codso and there it was – a beautiful little red-tailed fish swimming merrily around.

gu

es

e

Just then the ice-cream man came. “Tring, tring,” his bell rang.

tu

“Oh, let’s give him some ice-cream,” said Anuj.

Po r

“Fish don’t eat ice-cream, silly,” said Roopali.

fo

r

“But I will teach my fish to eat ice-cream,” said Anuj and ran off to ask his mother to buy some.

py

::

“There!” thought Masu. “This is life.”

D

ra

ft

co

Anuj was back soon with a milky ice-cream stick. He put a small blob into the codso. Masu swam quickly to the ice-cream and took a nice big bite. “Ouch, ouch!” he cried and danced all over the codso. “It’s so cold, so cold!” He jumped so high that he jumped right 3

Masu, the Unhappy Fish

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

out of the codso, into the sand, bang in the middle of Roopali’s sand castle.

4

Masu, the Unhappy Fish

tio

n

Roopali jumped up with fright and kicked the castle by mistake. And what do you think happened? Poor Masu was buried in the sand and the coconut shells. He couldn’t move. He couldn’t breathe.

e

tr

an

sl a

“Where’s my fish?” cried Anuj. He dug into the sand as quickly as his little hands could. “Here he is,” he whispered looking at the sand-covered Masu. He was still and lifeless. “Is he dead?” he asked.

gu

es

“I don’t think so,” said Roopali, “let’s put him back into the water. Quick!”

fo

r

Po r

tu

For a few seconds, Masu floated in the water. Then slowly he could breathe again. As soon as he was strong enough, he began to swim. Anuj and Roopali clapped their hands, and said, “Goodbye, little fish.”

ra

ft

co

py

::

Masu swam straight to his mother, right into her arms... rather, fins! “I don’t ever want to go to land again,” he sobbed. “I want to stay in the water for ever and ever.”

D

“And of course you shall, darling,” she said. She did not scold him because mothers always forgive and she knew that Masu had learnt his lesson. 5

n tio e

tr

an

sl a

Fix-It Fareeda

was seven years old. She was good at fixing things – pencil boxes, her brother’s cars, doll houses made of match boxes – she even fixed a leaky tap! She wanted to fix light fuses and mixers but her father said that she had to grow up a bit.

es

gu

r

Po r

tu

F

AREEDA

co

py

::

fo

Her older brother, Amin, constantly broke his cars or superheroes; he pushed on them too hard. Then he just said, “Fix it Fareeda!” She didn’t mind, she liked it.

D

ra

ft

Fareeda lived in the large village of Velim in Goa. Her neighbour Bosco was a carpenter. He had a workshop in his garage and was always hammering and drilling things. He repaired old furniture and made it look

Fix-It Fareeda

an

sl a

tio

n

beautiful again. He liked when Fareeda came and watched him. He had no children of his own and was happy to answer her questions. He taught her how to hit a nail smartly without hitting her finger. “You are very quick to learn, Fareeda,” he said. Fareeda felt very proud.

tu

gu

es

e

tr

One evening her mother found Fareeda sobbing in the garden with her dog Foxy in her lap. Foxy had fallen in a ditch and broken his leg. Fareeda had bandaged it but Foxy still couldn’t walk. “I can’t fix it,” cried Fareeda.

py

::

fo

r

Po r

Her mum picked her up with the dog and held them close. She told her, “We cannot fix everything that goes wrong. Sometimes there are special people with special qualifications to do that.”

co

“Who are these special people?” asked Fareeda.

ft

“A vet could fix Foxy’s leg,” her mummy said. “Does it live in

D

ra

“What’s a WET?” asked Farida. water?”

“No,” laughed her mummy. “A vet is spelt with the 7

Fix-It Fareeda letter V, not W. An animal doctor is called a vet, which is short for veterinary doctor.”

n

“Okay, mum, may we go to a vet now, please?”

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

So off they went to the vet.

The vet was a lady. Her name was Dr. Rita and she was so kind and gentle with Foxy. In no time at all 8

Fix-It Fareeda

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

she had bandaged his leg. She carefully placed Foxy on the ground. He stood still and then slowly limped forward to lick Dr. Rita’s hand. Fareeda looked in wonder at how she worked, and as soon as they were out, she turned to her mother and said, “Mum, can I be a vet too? I would rather fix wounded animals than fix Amin’s old toys and cars.”

gu

es

e

“Well,” said her mother, “you can certainly be a vet. But it takes a lot of reading and studying. Are you prepared to put in a lot of hard work?”

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

“Oh yes, Mum,” she replied. “I’ll do anything. But first, can I go back and ask Dr. Rita something?” And she ran back with Foxy in her arms. “Dr. Rita, Dr. Rita, can I come again and watch you working with the animals?”

co

py

Dr. Rita was delighted. “Of course, any time,” she said.

D

ra

ft

Now Foxy is much better, but Fareeda still goes often to visit Dr. Rita. She watches her and helps her whenever she is asked to. And Dr. Rita says she will make a fantastic vet when she grows up because she 9

Fix-It Fareeda cares for animals and is good at fixing things too.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

Has she forgotten about Bosco the carpenter? No. She still goes there every Sunday afternoon and every school holiday. Her Papa always says, “Make time for everything you love to do.” And Fareeda does.

10

n tio

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

A Leopard Comes to Dinner

having his dinner. His dog, Kutro, was barking outside. “Bow wow! Bow wow!” Suddenly Kutro yelped. Nine-year-old Antonio ran with a torch to the door.

tu

Po r

fo

r

A

NTONIO WAS

ra

ft

co

py

::

“What’s the matter...,” he shouted and then he stopped and stared. Just three feet in front of him was a huge leopard with Kutro’s foot in its mouth. It was slowly backing away, dragging the dog with him.

D

For a few moments, Antonio was frozen with fear. He shone the torch in the leopard’s eyes. He remembered

A Leopard Comes to Dinner his father saying that wild animals were afraid of bright lights and loud noises.

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

“Papa! Papa!” he yelled loudly, at the top of his voice. For one fearful moment the leopard looked at him. “Is he going to come for me?” Antonio wondered. But the leopard just dropped Kutro and turned and ran into the jungle.

gu

es

e

Antonio’s Papa, Santan, came running out. “Antonio, what happened?” Then they both ran towards Kutro.

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

They carried the dog into the house. Kutro’s leg was badly wounded but not broken. Antonio’s mother helped to put crushed lojechi vhokoll* on the leg and bandage it with a piece of her old sari. Kutro looked quite funny with a coloured leg. He looked at his leg as he limped.

D

ra

ft

co

Santan went out into the dark night. They lived in Bicholim at the edge of a small forest. It was a little hamlet called Warte-Vathadev. Sometimes they had heard the cries of wild animals but this was the first time that one had ever come so close to the house. * lojechi

vhokoll = a local, medicinal plant

12

A Leopard Comes to Dinner

“We have to do

an

sl a

“It came here?” gasped Shriram. something!”

tio

“Yes,” Santan said. “He nearly got our Kutro.”

n

His closest neighbour Shriram had heard the commotion and come out with his torch. “The leopard growling again?” he inquired.

es

e

tr

“I know,” said Santan, suddenly trembling. “It may take one of the children!”

tu

gu

“What shall we do?” Shriram asked. “I think we should hold a village meeting tomorrow morning.”

r

Po r

So, the next morning, when the children went to school, the village held a meeting.

fo

“We can lay a trap,” said Santan.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

“Yes,” said Kala Kaka. “There are many stray dogs around here.” He ran to the jack fruit tree and caught a small stray puppy with a long, pointed tail, which was sleeping there. “Here, let’s use this little pup as bait in a cage. When the leopard goes in, the door of the cage will shut and we will catch the leopard.”

13

A Leopard Comes to Dinner “Who will build the cage?” asked Raju. “Where is Uday, the carpenter?”

n

“I am here,” said Uday, coming up. “What can I do?”

sl a

tio

“You have to build us a cage to act like a trap for a wild leopard,” said Mr. Kamat, the merchant.

gu

es

e

tr

an

The village soon set to work, collecting wood, making planks and buying nails. The little brown puppy that was now named Shempdi* , was kept in Kala Kaka’s shed outside the house.

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

By evening, the children came home from school. They gathered outside Antonio’s house to talk about the leopard. Kutro was the centre of attraction. The children petted him. They brought him pao† and toast to eat. Kutro lapped it all up, hobbling about with his colourful bandage.

ft

co

“Will the leopard come again tonight?” asked a frightened Leela from next door.

D

ra

“I am going to stay with you tonight, Antonio,” said Salim, “I want to see the leopard.” * Shempdi † pao

= Konkani, for tail = Goan bread

14

A Leopard Comes to Dinner “May I stay too?” asked Manuel.

n

“You are really brave, Antonio,” said Savita, “I would have just fainted.”

sl a

tio

“Ha! Ha!” laughed Abhishek. “Then the leopard would have eaten you. Meal Is Ready!”

tr

an

“Ha, ha, ha, ha,” all the children laughed, and Savita was in tears.

es

e

“Stop it!” shouted Antonio. “It is not funny.”

Po r

tu

gu

“What’s all the discussion about?” asked Santan, coming through the village carrying a big wooden cage. Uday, Shriram and Bosco were helping him.

fo

r

“What’s that?” asked all the children together.

::

“It’s a trap to catch the leopard,” said Santan.

py

“How does it work?” asked Salim.

ra

ft

co

“Here,” said Kala Kaka, “meet Shempdi. She will be the bait in the cage to catch our leopard.”

D

Shempdi ran to Savita and licked her toes. All the children looked shocked.

15

A Leopard Comes to Dinner “What if the leopard eats Shempdi, Papa?” asked Antonio.

an

sl a

tio

n

The men looked at each other. “Didn’t you think about that?” asked Antonio’s mother, coming out of their house and standing at the door with her hands on her hips. “What if it was our Kutro?”

e

tr

Savita had picked up Shempdi. “Please, please Uncle, don’t use Shempdi.”

Po r

tu

gu

es

“Yes, it is cruelty to animals. We learnt all about that in school,” said Chaitanya who was the smart one. “We can call the Forest Department and ask them to help.”

co

py

::

fo

r

The next day, Mr. Kamat called the Forest Department. The Forest Officer asked all the families to keep fires burning outside their houses and keep watch all night. His team gave them a talk the next morning on how to protect their chickens and goats.

D

ra

ft

The Forest Officer arrived to join his team. They looked for leopard tracks. They then laid a trap with some meat. For three nights they waited. On the fourth evening, the leopard came. It was getting dark. 16

A Leopard Comes to Dinner Everyone was watching from their windows. Salim whispered, “It’s here, it’s here!”

n

“Shhh!” they all silenced him.

sl a

tio

Suddenly Kutro began to howl in fear. Antonio ran to him, caught his mouth and held him tight.

tr

an

The leopard stopped. Then moved forward. He was hungry.

gu

es

e

He stepped into the trap and pulled at the meat. The trap door snapped shut.

r

Po r

tu

The leopard looked up and continued to eat. The Forest Officer crept forward and checked the trap. The men secured it with more ropes.

co

py

::

fo

Then, slowly, everyone came out of their houses, one by one. The leopard growled softly. His stomach was full. The forest team took the leopard to the Bondla Reserve* .

D

ra

ft

No one slept that night. There was much talking and feasting. * Bondla

Reserve, Goa’s wildlife sanctuary

17

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

A Leopard Comes to Dinner

18

A Leopard Comes to Dinner

n

Santan made a big bonfire and everyone brought what they had; sweet potatoes, cashew nuts and even a few bangdas* which were all roasted over the fire.

sl a

tio

Savita was stroking Shempdi. “May I keep her, Ma?” she asked her mother.

tr

an

“Yes,” her mother said, “but you must look after her yourself.”

es

e

“Thank you, thank you! I shall take good care of her.”

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

It does, doesn’t it?

Po r

tu

gu

Savita did take good care of her. She also changed Shempdi’s name to Leopardine. “Leopardine sounds very regal,” she said.

* bangdas

= mackerels, a popular local fish

19

n tio

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Espi Mai is Stuck Again!

S EQUEIRA family was all in a tizzy. Mama Angelica was dusting the piano for the twentieth time. Papa was going to the window at the sound of each passing rickshaw. “I should have gone and picked her up from the station,” he said, to no one in particular. “But you know what she is like; she would have told me off in front of a train full of people.”

gu

tu

py

::

fo

r

Po r

T

HE

ra

ft

co

“I remember her from the last time she visited us,” said Roy, who was twelve years old. “She got stuck in the storeroom door.”

D

“Don’t you dare mention it!” said Papa. “I remember her cheeks shaking when she walked

Espi Mai is Stuck Again! fast,” said Amelia, who was ten, giggling quietly.

tio

Why, Mama?” asked

sl a

“I don’t remember anything! three-year-old Nia.

n

“And I remember how many poyo* she ate for breakfast! Six!” said six-year-old Leon.

an

“Because you were not born!” they all said together.

e

tr

“Where is she coming from?” asked Nia.

tu

gu

es

“From Chinchpokli, Mumbai,” said Roy and guffawed loudly. “Such a funny name! And her full name is Especiosa Conceição Apolina de Souza Pinto.”

Po r

“Stop it, Roy!” Mama scolded.

co

py

::

fo

r

“Pank! Pank!” screeched an old rickshaw horn as it turned round the corner and stopped at the Sequeira gate. The children all ran out. Papa Robert went to the rickshaw and took Espi Mai’s bag into the house.

D

ra

ft

All the children watched as Espi Mai, dressed in a bright floral dress and flat sensible shoes, began to get out of the rickshaw. * poyo

= a type of Goan bread

21

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

Espi Mai is Stuck Again!

22

Espi Mai is Stuck Again! She put both feet out of the rickshaw. She put her head out and then she got STUCK!

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

She just could not get her body out. She tugged and tugged at her body but it would not budge. The rickshaw shook and rattled and the rickshaw driver jumped out to help. Papa and Roy and the children all pulled at Espi Mai. The children were perspiring while they tugged and Espi Mai was red in the face. But she was STUCK!

Po r

tu

gu

Nia began to cry. She could not understand what was happening.

fo

r

Mama came and picked her up. “How did you get in, Espi Mai?” asked Mama.

::

“I put one foot in and then sat and slid in.”

ra

ft

co

py

“Then try that!” said Roy. So Papa helped to push her back. Then she put one foot out, using her hands to push herself, she slid to the end of the seat and was out!

D

“Honestly, they make these rickshaws smaller and smaller,” grumbled Espi Mai. 23

Espi Mai is Stuck Again!

tio

n

“They have been the same size all these years, Espi Mai,” said Papa. She was not really his mother. In fact she was his grand-aunt who was widowed when she was young, and she had no children.

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Nia watched from behind Mama’s skirt as Espi Mai plonked down on the easy chair. She was very short and round all over. “Come, come,” Espi Mai called to Nia. “This is your new addition, Robert? Oh, she is a pretty one!”

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

Espi Mai had dinner; two bowls of pez* , three pao† , four pieces of chicken, and a small hill of rice, fish curry, fish and vegetable. As she ate, she talked about her neighbours and friends. She told them funny stories and gave them lots and lots of chocolates.

co

py

::

“We can only eat two pieces of chocolate after dinner, Espi Mai,” complained Leon.

D

ra

ft

“That’s very good, Leon,” said Espi Mai. “No one stopped me and you don’t want to look like me, do * pez † pao

= a rice porridge = traditional bread

24

Espi Mai is Stuck Again! you?” Leon shook his head vigorously. Amelia giggled again.

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

After dinner, Espi Mai sat at the piano. She played Bach and Mozart with great style and talent and then she sang party songs, including Hanv Saiba Poltoddi Vetam * and made the children and Mama and Papa join in. It was all great fun.

gu

es

e

The next day was a school holiday and Espi Mai took everyone on a shopping spree.

Po r

tu

“You too must buy a new dress, Espi Mai,” said Amelia.

py

::

fo

r

So they all helped Espi Mai to choose a nice navy blue dress which looked very smart. She went to try it on but as she was getting into the dressing cubicle, she got STUCK!

ra

ft

co

All the Sequeiras ran and pulled her out before anyone made fun of her. They tugged and she came away and they all fell on the floor and laughed. * Hanv

D

Saiba Poltoddi Vetam = a Konkani folk song meaning ‘I’m going aross the river’

25

Espi Mai is Stuck Again!

n

“I’ll try it here, over my dress,” said Espi Mai. She pulled the dress over her head and then she could not take it off. It was STUCK!

an

sl a

tio

The children all began to love this fun-loving, kind and generous lady but what could they do about her getting stuck?

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

When they finally got home with the new blue dress over her old one, Espi Mai sat down and looked at the family. “I need your help,” she said. “Will you help me to control my eating and do some exercise so that I can lose some weight?”

fo

r

They all looked surprised. Then they all said together, “Of course we will.”

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

So for the next month, Mum made boiled doodhi* , curry with no coconut and steamed fish and some kismur† on the side. Papa took her for morning walks on Baga beach, the children all took turns to walk with her in the evening, and every time she asked for extra pudding, Nia began to cry and * doodhi † kismur

= pumpkin = dry prawn salad

26

Espi Mai is Stuck Again! say, “No, please, you will get stuck again!” How could Espi Mai not listen to her?

an

sl a

tio

n

You won’t believe it, but by the end of the month, Espi Mai had lost six kilos. Not much, but it was a start. “Thank you very, very much. I shall keep to what you helped me start,” she said.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

And she did. A year later she was back... in a rickshaw! This time she jumped right out! Everyone laughed with joy. Espi Mai was never stuck again!

27

tio

n r

gu

Po r

G

co

py

::

fo

All of a sudden He jumped in the air; That made all the people Turn around and stare.

D

ra

ft

He giggled and laughed He squiggled his toes He opened his mouth He blew from his nose

Gautam Gurudas Fell flat in the sand His bucket and spade Struck up a band!

tu

autam Gurudas Walked in the sand With bucket and spade Held tight in his hand

es

e

tr

an

sl a

From Delhi to Goa

All the people around They gave him a hand But nobody knew As the commotion arose That a tiny crab Was tickling his toes! Gautam Gurudas Was from Delhi you see So he was new to Goa The sand and the sea.

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

From Delhi to Goa

29

n tio

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Devika Duck is Barking!

Duck was a dirty white Manila Duck. She was ugly. She was big and the other ducks didn’t like her. But Devika didn’t care. She had a friend. He was her best friend. He was Ginger, the dog.

gu

tu

Po r

D

EVIKA

::

fo

r

Devika and Ginger lived with a seven-year-old boy called Kris Souza and his family on a farm in Valpoi.

ft

co

py

Ginger was a lovely, friendly, golden brown Dachshund. Ginger felt sorry for Devika. “Come play with me,” he said. “I have a ball. Can you throw?”

D

ra

“Of course not!” Devika quacked. “There’s no need to be rude,” said Ginger.

Devika Duck is Barking!

n

Devika didn’t want to lose her new friend. “Sorry,” she whispered. She went to the ball and pushed it with her fat bill. “Come on, get it!” she called to Ginger.

an

sl a

tio

Ginger and Devika had quite a game. They ran all over the farm and around the house, pushing the ball and catching it.

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

“Ginger! Ginger!” called Kris from the kitchen door. “Come on Ginger, here’s your food!” But Ginger didn’t want his dinner. He didn’t want anything. He had found a new friend to play with. “Ginger! Ginger!” yelled Kris again, banging on Ginger’s metal bowl with a spoon.

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Kris got tired of calling and left the bowl of food and some water at the doorstep. Finally, finally, Ginger and Devika were tired. “I’m going to the pond for some water,” said Devika, gasping. “Coming?” she asked.

D

ra

“No,” said Ginger, “Kris must have left my bowl of water and my food at the door. Will you come with me?” 31

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

Devika Duck is Barking!

32

Devika Duck is Barking! “Okay,” said Devika, waddling behind Ginger.

tio

“What’s this

sl a

She then looked into his food bowl. brown stuff?” she asked.

n

Ginger was a loving dog. He let Devika sip the water first, and then he lapped up the rest.

tr

an

“Oh, that’s meat and bones mixed with some rice. It’s very good, try some.”

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

So Devika pecked at the rice till she had had enough and then Ginger gobbled up the rest. He lay down in the shade of the old mango tree. Devika looked at him, ruffled her feathers and lay between his paws. They were both so, so tired. They slept. Kris came out to see if Ginger had had his food. He looked at the dog and duck sleeping, smiled and ran in to get his camera.

D

ra

ft

co

Devika Duck and Ginger became the best of friends. They played ball together and went for long walks. Sometimes he went to drink water in the duck pond while she swam and cooled off and splashed water on him. 33

Devika Duck is Barking!

sl a

tio

n

But the funniest sight was Devika rubbing Ginger’s back. She would climb onto his back and rub his head with her fat bill. He liked that and fell asleep. Then he would wake up and they would have dinner together.

es

e

tr

an

Every night, Devika would go back to the yard near the duck pond. The other ducks teased her and called, “Devika is a dirty duck!” But it didn’t bother her anymore. She had a friend.

Po r

tu

gu

And every morning, she came up to the back door of the house and called out to Ginger. “Quack! Quack!” she called.

py

::

fo

r

“There’s your friend, Ginger!” Kris would call, and Ginger would go bounding out of the house, his ears flying and his tail high, ready for action.

D

ra

ft

co

Kris had just begun the new school year. Now he did not have time to play with Ginger all day. So Ginger’s new friendship with Devika made him very happy. When Kris came back from school, he took his Papa’s cell phone with the camera and began to film Devika and Ginger. 34

Devika Duck is Barking!

n

But the dog and the duck did not know this of course. Ginger would tell Devika about the TV programs that he watched at night and she would listen in wonder.

sl a

tio

“Do you mean there are stories about animals on TV?” Devika asked.

es

e

tr

an

“Oh yes,” said Ginger. “Sometimes they are about real animals and birds like us, and sometimes they are about cartoon characters.”

gu

“Are there any about ducks and dogs?” asked Devika.

Po r

tu

“Oh yes, there is a Donald Duck and Goofy the Dog and Kalia the Crow and Chamataka the Fox,” explained Ginger.

co

py

::

fo

r

“Wow! Can I come into the house one day and watch?” asked Devika. “And tell me, do they speak Duck language?” Devika liked to have everything very clear.

D

ra

ft

“No!” laughed Ginger, “They tell stories in Hindi, Marathi, English, Gujarati, Bengali, Tamil... but not in Duck!” “Okay, okay,” laughed Devika. “I know, we animals 35

Devika Duck is Barking! don’t need to learn any language, right? We know them all!”

sl a

tio

n

“Come on,” said Ginger, “the back door is open, Mai Mai* is busy in the kitchen and there is no one else at home.”

gu

es

e

tr

an

So Devika Duck and Ginger the Dog watched cartoons for a whole hour before Kris came home from school. He took out his Papa’s cell phone again, filmed them and then shooed them out.

tu

They went out into the backyard to play.

Po r

“I like being with you, Ginger. But I want to learn to bark like you,” said Devika.

fo

r

“Why?” asked Ginger.

co

py

::

“Because you are my friend and I want to do everything that you do,” she replied.

ra

ft

“Open your mouth, take a big gulp of air, pull your stomach in and BARK! Bark! Bark!” he showed off. Mai = affectionate term for a grandmother

D

* Mai

36

Devika Duck is Barking!

n

Devika tried. She opened her bill, took a huge gulp of air, pulled her stomach in and “Quack!” That was all she could do. “Quack.”

tr

an

sl a

tio

“You keep trying every day, Devika. That’s the only way to learn. Kris told me that when I was learning to jump and catch the ball. Now I am an expert catcher. You just keep trying, Devika. Just keep trying.”

gu

es

e

So every morning, Devika would wake up, take a big gulp of air, pull her stomach in and bark. Poor Devika. She only went, “Quack! Quack!”

fo

r

Po r

tu

One nice sunny Saturday afternoon, Kris came out to play ball. Kris and Ginger ran to the edge of the pond where the grass was green and dry and began to play ball. Devika followed, waddling slowly after them.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

“Wow, Ginger!” cried Kris, “you are getting very good at catching. Shall we try from a little further now?” And Kris went further and threw the ball. Ginger flew high into the air to catch the ball. And S-P-L-A-S-H ! he fell into the pond. Down... down... down he went into murky water. All four of his legs got tangled in the weeds growing in 37

Devika Duck is Barking! the pond. He was swallowing water....

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

“Gin–ger! Gin–ger!” yelled Kris. Devika jumped into the pond. She could see Ginger but she could not help. He was deep, deep down. Kris pulled off his shirt and jumped in too. He dived under the water and caught hold of Ginger. He pulled him up and held his head above the water. Ginger gulped for air and shook himself. He shook so hard that Kris went under again.

r

Po r

tu

gu

Now Kris’s foot got caught in the weeds! Poor, poor Kris. He was a small boy. He just managed to get his face and Ginger’s head above the water. And Ginger was heavy. Were they both going to drown?

fo

“Go for help, Devika!” barked Ginger.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

Devika ran. Devika ran like she had never run before. Devika forgot she had webbed feet. Devika forgot that she waddled. She just ran and ran till she came to the kitchen window. She quacked, “Quack! Quack!” No one looked out. She quacked again. “Quack! Quack!” Then she took a huge gulp of air, pulled in her stomach and barked. “QU...ARK!” Once more: 38

Devika Duck is Barking! “Q-U-A-R-K!”

sl a

tio

n

Kris’ mum, Milagrina, came running to the window. “That’s Devika the Manila Duck and she is barking!” she cried. Kris’s papa, Francisco, and brother and sister all came out.

tr

an

“QUARK! QUARK! QUARK!” went Devika and began to run towards the pond.

gu

es

e

“She’s trying to tell us something!” shouted Francisco. “Come on, I think there’s some trouble.”

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

They ran after Devika and there in the pond was Kris, his head just out of the water, desperately holding onto Ginger. Kris could not speak. He was too tired. Ginger was able to give a feeble bark. But Devika went on and on and on. “QUARK! QUARK! QUARK! QUARK!”

ra

ft

co

The whole family pulled Kris and Ginger out of the water and dried them. They went home and Milagrina gave them warm milk to drink.

D

“Thank you, Devika,” said Kris.

39

Devika Duck is Barking! “Thanks, pal,” barked Ginger. “Do you know that you were actually barking?”

tio

n

“I know, I know,” said an excited Devika. “I’m a dog now!”

es

e

tr

an

sl a

“No, Devika,” said Ginger. “You will never be a dog. But you are the best friend a dog could have! It just shows that when you want to do something and you try hard enough, you can do anything!”

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

Now Devika often slept on the kitchen floor with Ginger. But very soon all the other ducks began to look upon Devika as a heroine and called her to play with them. She went, of course. After all, she was a duck. And she often invited Ginger to join them.

ra

ft

co

py

::

Kris finished his film and sent it to the Children’s Films Division. They accepted it and showed it on TV. On the day it was aired, the entire family sat down to watch. Many children from the village came to see the film. Ginger and Devika sat too.

D

And what was the film called? You guessed right: “Devika Duck is barking!” 40

n tio

es

e

tr

an

sl a

The Lace Maker

little village called Raia in South Goa there lived a white-haired lady named Norma. Norma was old but not frail or weak. Norma was smart and clever. She walked briskly and talked to everyone that she met on the street.

gu

tu

fo

r

Po r

I

N THE QUAINT

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

“Aunty Norma, Aunty Norma, will you teach us a song for our school competition?” children would ask. People always stopped her and asked for her advice, or the name of a doctor or the telephone number of a good lawyer. Some asked for recipes, some complained about their children not studying and some cried and said that their husbands drank too

The Lace Maker

tio

n

much feni* . Norma advised them all. Even the parish priest, Fr. Norbert, asked for her advice about what hymns should be sung on feast days. Norma was what they called “the backbone” of Raia.

es

e

tr

an

sl a

One day as Norma was walking briskly down the street, a pig jumped out of the gutter and ran into her. The pig squealed “wheeee!” Norma squealed “eeeeee!” and fell over the pig and into the gutter. People came running. Norma lay fallen and pale.

tu

gu

“Pick her up! Pick her up!” they shouted.

Po r

“Give her some feni,” said Mr. Souza. “Straighten her leg,” ordered Mrs. Shetgaonkar.

fo

r

“Disht† ,” said sharp, old Champabai.

co

py

::

“Just keep quiet all of you and call for the ambulance,” said Norma softly. “I’ve broken my leg and don’t any of you touch it, please.”

D

ra

ft

The next day the entire village went to see Norma in the hospital. They talked, they laughed, they advised, * feni

= Goan liquor = evil eye

† disht

42

The Lace Maker they brought pez,* ladoos† and kheer‡ . Norma was tired. “I want to go home,” she said.

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

After eight days Norma was sent home. For a few days people came with flowers or a slice of bibinca§ or dodol¶ . But soon no one came. Everyone carried on with their lives. Norma lived alone. Her maid came in every morning, cooked, cleaned and went away. For a few days she came to help Norma in the evenings. But when Norma could move around more freely, that too stopped. Norma had nothing to do. Norma had no one to advise. One day she even cried. Tears were rolling down her pale cheeks. “Stop it!” she scolded herself. “Stop feeling sorry for yourself. Do something.”

py

::

fo

Just then Sailee who lived next door, called from the window: “Aunty Norma!”

co

“Come in Sailee, the door is open,” said Norma, quickly wiping her wet cheeks. * pez

ft

= a rice porridge = Indian sweets ‡ kheer = milk pudding § bibinca = a traditional Goan dessert ¶ dodol = A sweet made from jaggery and coconut

D

ra

† ladoos

43

The Lace Maker

n

Sailee was a little girl of six years. She was plump and chocolate brown, with a bright flashing smile. “Aunty Norma, do you have any lace?”

tio

“Lace? What for, Sailee?” asked Norma.

an

sl a

“The lace on my dolly’s dress is torn and Mama said that you make beautiful lace,” said Sailee.

tr

“Oh, I used to when I was young,” Norma said.

gu

es

e

“Have you now forgotten how to?” Sailee wanted to know. “I need just a bit.”

tu

“Okay, I’ll try. Come back tomorrow,” Norma said.

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

Norma took her walker and slowly went to her cupboard. “I’m like Old Mother Hubbard now,” she laughed to herself. In an old shoebox she found her crochet needle and some thread. Slowly, she began to crochet a lovely lacy dress. “Hey, I’m still good!” she told herself.

D

ra

ft

“Oh, it is beautiful!” cried Sailee when she saw the dress the next day. “Is it really for me?” “Of course it is,” said Norma. 44

The Lace Maker “Thank you! Thank you, Aunty Norma,” said Sailee as she threw her arms around Norma and kissed her.

an

sl a

tio

n

The next day, Tara from down the road came knocking at Norma’s window. “Aunty Norma! Aunty Norma, can you make some lace for my dolly, Shalini?” she yelled. “She’s naked. She has no dress at all!”

es

e

tr

Norma laughed. “Leave her with me; I’ll see what I can do.”

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

The next evening, Tara’s doll, Shalini, had a beautiful white lace blouse and a pink lace skirt. There was a little pink ribbon on the blouse. Tara was so excited, she couldn’t say anything. But she threw her arms round Norma’s neck and hugged her.

ft

co

py

::

The following day Tara brought her friend Lourdes with her doll. Then came Alina. Then Pooja. Then two year old Suresh came with his Teddy Bear who needed a vest. Norma soon ran out of thread.

D

ra

“Pooja, here is some money, please ask your mother to go to Natekar’s shop and buy me some coloured thread,” Norma said. 45

The Lace Maker

tio

n

Pooja’s mother came in the next day with a whole box of different coloured thread. “Norma, will you teach me to make lace? My sister is getting married soon and I want to make round, lace table covers for her.”

an

sl a

“I want to learn too,” said Pooja who was very good with her hands.

es

e

tr

“Learn what?” asked Tara’s mother, looking in from the window.

gu

“To make lace,” said Pooja.

tu

“Oh, will you teach me too?” asked Tara’s mother.

r

Po r

“Why don’t I start a crochet lace-making class every evening?” asked Norma.

co

py

::

fo

“That’s a great idea!” said Lourdes’ mother, joining the crowd on the veranda. “And we will bring some snacks too,” she said.

D

ra

ft

Soon there was a daily lace-making party at Norma’s house. Everyone learnt to make lace. The grownups made lace for the dolls, for their children, for their altars, for their pooja* tables, for beds and chairs and * pooja

= prayer

46

The Lace Maker

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

sometimes just for fun!

47

The Lace Maker

n

All of Raia learnt to make lace. And while they made lace, the children played outside and ate the snacks that all the mothers brought.

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

Norma got well in two months’ time. Her leg healed. One evening she told her lace-making class that the next day she was going to take a walk down the road. As she stepped out the next evening, who was there to greet her? Sailee, Tara, Pooja, Alina, Lourdes, Suresh and all the children of Raia, all clutching their dolls and teddies dressed in lace made by Norma. “Oh how beautiful you all look,” cried Norma.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

Very soon she was walking briskly down the road. “I’ll never feel sorry for myself again,” she said to herself. “I know that I will always find something to do.”

48

n tio

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy?

rang the doorbell and flew into the house when the door was opened. “Mummy, Mummy, I got a star, I got a star for my writing book!”

tu

Po r

r

N

AVNITA

fo

“That’s wonderful, darling. Who gave you the star?”

py

::

“My teacher of course!”

co

“Does your new teacher have a name?”

ft

“Of course, her name is ‘Teacher’.”

D

ra

“And who am I?” “You are Mummy.” “And do I have a name?”

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy? “Yes, Anjali Shirodkar.”

n

“So the teacher too should have a name, Navnita. Will you ask her tomorrow?”

sl a

tio

“Okay, but everyone calls her ‘Teacher’.”

an

“Now have a wash, change your clothes, and eat what your Aaji* has made for tea.”

gu

es

e

tr

Fifteen minutes later, Navnita turned to her mother again, “Mummy, do you want onion bhojim† ? Your favourite!”

tu

“Oh no,” said Mummy and she went to the bathroom.

fo

r

Po r

“Mummy, Mummy, why are you sick? I’ll call Aaji. Aaji! Come soon!”

::

Poor Aaji tried her best to hurry.

py

“What’s happened, Navnita? Have you had a fall?”

ra

ft

co

“No, Aaji, I gave Mummy some onion bhojim and she is very sick. She only looked at them!”

D

Aaji smiled. “Oh, she will be okay.” * Aaji

= grandmother = a local snack

† bhojim

50

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy? “Mummy, are you okay?” “Yes, darling.”

tio

n

“But your face is white.”

sl a

“I’ll tell you a secret.”

tr

an

“Are you going to die like Sheetal Aunty died of cancer?”

e

“No, no, mine is a lovely secret,” Mummy said.

gu

es

“Can I know your secret?” whispered Navnita.

Po r

“Wow! Can I choose?”

tu

“Yes, you are going to have a sister or a brother.”

fo

r

“No,” laughed Mummy, “we have to take what God gives us. Isn’t this a great secret?”

co

py

::

“Y...e. . . s. . . ,” said Navnita, “but who is God going to send the baby with?”

ra

ft

“With me,” Mummy whispered. “The baby is right here in my tummy.”

D

“In your tummy???? asked.

Are you pregnant?” Navnita

51

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy? “Yes, but who told you about pregnancy?” Mummy wanted to know.

sl a

tio

n

“Oh, teacher said that people should give place to old people or pregnant women in the bus or train,” Navnita replied.

tr

an

“I see, and what else did teacher tell you, Navnita?” Mummy asked.

tu

gu

es

e

“Oh, she told us about a Soon Ami and how the waves are as high as a building,” Navnita told her mother. “Will this Ami come soon, Mummy?”

Po r

“No, my dear,” her mother said, “a tsunami is one word spelt with a T for tsunami. But the T is silent.”

::

fo

r

“Yes, a tsunami is like an earthquake in the sea,” Navnita continued.

ra

ft

co

py

“But teacher didn’t tell us who puts a baby in a Mummy’s tummy. Can you put a baby in mine too, Mummy?” Navnita wanted to know.

D

“No, darling, only mothers can have babies and they grow from a small seed. After nine months, the baby is full grown and ready to be born.” 52

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy? “Can we then play with the baby?”

n

“Yes, you can, but we have to handle the baby very gently.”

tio

“Can it break like glass?” Navnita asked.

an

sl a

“No, but a baby is soft and delicate,” Mummy said, “we have to be gentle.”

es

e

tr

“Ummm, ‘Handle With Care’,” Navnita said, “just like we see on some parcels at the airport.”

gu

“Attachim bhurghim!* ” Aaji laughed.

Po r

tu

“Can I name the baby? If it is a girl, can I call her Hannah Montana after the singer?”

py

::

fo

r

“Areh, areh, all our people will not be able to say her name! And the bhatji† will not know that she belongs to our family,” Aaja‡ said as he came in, laughing at his grandchild.

D

ra

ft

co

“We still have six more months before the baby comes, Navnita, and you can give us some names. We will all make a list and then choose one, okay?” Mummy said. * Attachim

bhurghim! = These children of today! = a Hindu priest ‡ aaja = grandfather

† bhatji

53

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy?

tio

n

“Yay!” Navnita shouted. “I shall ask all my friends and teacher too when I go to school tomorrow and I will... oh, oh, oh! It is a secret. Can I tell my best friend Rita?”

an

sl a

“Okay, darling. But not the whole class, just Rita.” Mummy said.

es

e

tr

One early morning, six months later, Aaji woke up Navnita. “Wake up, child, you have a baby brother.”

gu

“Wha... where. . . where???” Navnita asked.

Po r

tu

“Not here, Mummy is in the hospital. The baby was born last night,” Aaji said.

fo

r

“Can I see him? Have you seen him, Aaji?” Navnita asked.

co

py

::

“No, but your Papa is coming to take us now, so you must get dressed. Come, I’ll comb your hair.”

D

ra

ft

“No, Aaji, I am a Didi* now. I can dress myself.”

* Didi

= elder sister

54

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy?

55

Mummy, Who Put the Baby in Your Tummy?

sl a

tio

n

A little later, Navnita looked down at the little bundle that was her brother. He lay beside her Mummy all wrapped up in a blue blanket. She stared and stared at him in wonder: “He is soooo small!” she whispered. “I can’t give him the name I wanted to.”

tr

an

“What is the name you wanted, Navnita?” her father asked.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

“Spiderman,” she whispered.

56

n tio

Tikhli! Time to go home!” Roger said, speaking loudly.

gu

OME ON

tu

C

es

e

tr

an

sl a

What’s in a Name?

Po r

“Why does he call you Tikhli, when your name is Joanna?” asked Samira.

::

fo

r

“I don’t know. It is a pet name I guess. My family all call me Tikhli,” Joanna replied.

co

py

“May be you were a little ‘dot’ when you were a baby,” Samira reasoned.

D

ra

ft

“Ha, ha!” laughed Roger. “I think so too. She was always so tiny... even now!” “Oh shut up, Roger, let’s go,” said Joanna, climbing onto her brother’s bicycle. “Why was I nicknamed

What’s in a Name? Tikhli, Roger?” she asked.

tio

n

“I really think it’s because you were such a cute, tiny baby. Mai wouldn’t let us hold you in case we dropped you,” laughed Roger.

tr

an

sl a

On the next Saturday, Roger was playing football with his friends. “What are you going to do after SSC exams next month?” asked Jeevan.

gu

es

e

“I’m going to college,” said Roger. “My parents want me to be well educated so I can do well in life.”

tu

“I guess I’ll do the same,” said Jeevan.

Po r

“And what about you, Tome?” they asked.

py

::

fo

r

“I’m going to help my father with the farm. Perhaps I’ll do Distance Education after one year. And you, Francis?”

ft

co

“Oh Francis has so many girlfriends. I think he’ll get married first,” laughed Roger.

D

ra

“Oh no, he’s a Tikhlo, he won’t get married so soon,” laughed Tome. Roger was suddenly alert. “What’s a Tikhlo?” he asked. 58

What’s in a Name?

sl a

tio

n

“When a boy is born after three girls he is a Tikhlo. It is a Konkani word. It means he is ‘stuck’. He usually does not marry and even if he does, he stays at home and looks after his parents. That is an old tradition in Goa,” Tome explained.

tr

an

“Yeah,” laughed Francis. “I’m Tikhlo for life! Now kick the ball, Roger. What’s wrong with you?”

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

But Roger couldn’t play. He was distracted. He was worried. So, that was the real meaning behind tikhli* . His darling sister was born after three of them... all brothers! That is why no one discussed Tikhli’s future at home. No one praised her when she came first in class. No one ever said she would have to go to college. Tikhli was stuck. She would be kept at home all her life. She would never marry. She would never....

ft

co

“Roger! You kicked the ball in the wrong goal!” someone shouted.

D

ra

“Oh sorry, sorry,” Roger said. “I... I... think the sun’s too hot now. I have a headache, I’m going home.” * tikhli,

corruption of tikhlem = feminine for tikhlo

59

What’s in a Name?

sl a

tio

n

Before anyone could say anything, Roger mounted his bicycle and pedalled off. He had to pass a little stream near the Pernem tinto* and then cross a bridge. He stopped at the stream to wash his face. “I won’t let it happen,” he told his reflection in the water. “I won’t!”

e

tr

an

“Roger!” called his mom when he entered the house. “Go have a bath and come to dinner. Tony! Peter! Tikhli! Come for dinner!”

gu

es

“Her name is Joanna,” said Roger firmly.

tu

“What’s wrong with you?” his father asked.

Po r

“I know the meaning of Tikhli,” Roger answered.

co

py

::

fo

r

His parents stayed quiet. Next day, Roger took Joanna and Peter to the football ground after school. He taught both of them to kick, bounce, dribble and throw the ball. Joanna was quite good. His mission had begun.

D

ra

ft

August was exam time. It was the rainy season. This was transplanting time in the rice fields too and the * tinto

= market place

60

What’s in a Name? children’s father had just come home from a hard day’s work.

sl a

tio

“Leave it,” her father said. “Do what you know.”

n

“I can’t solve this math problem,” cried Joanna.

tr

an

Roger left his books. “I’ll show you,” he said. He patiently explained the problem to her. “Hey, you’re clever,” she said punching him on the shoulder.

gu

es

e

“Hey, you’re clever too, we’re related, remember!” he laughed.

r

Po r

tu

Joanna did well in her Math exam. She did well in Hindi and Konkani too. Peter came to her one day, “Hey Joanna, can you help me with a Hindi essay?”

fo

“Why don’t you ask Roger?” their mother said.

co

py

::

“No,” said Roger, “I am busy and Joanna is better than me with essays.”

ra

ft

The next Sunday, their father, Polycarp, needed help to put some tiles on the roof.

D

“Tony! Come and help me!” he called. “Can I help too, Pai?” asked Joanna. 61

What’s in a Name? “No, Tikhli. You go play with your toys.”

n

“Roger says that we must not call her Tikhli,” said Tony.

sl a

tio

“And she is my daughter, I can call her whatever I want!” shouted Polycarp.

tr

an

“She is my daughter too,” said their mother, Mercy, coming outside. “And we will call her Joanna.”

gu

es

e

“It is my name, Papa,” wailed Joanna, “and I like my name.”

Po r

tu

“I shall call her Jo,” said Peter. “She is just like one of us and can play football better than some of the boys.” “do you play

fo

r

“FOOTBALL!” Polycarp shouted, football?”

py

::

“Yes, I taught her,” said Roger.

ft

co

“Oh Mai, Mai!” cried Mercy. “Such shame, that our daughter plays boys’ games.”

D

ra

“There is no shame, Mai” explained Roger. “Don’t we help you wash dishes? And fry chapattis sometimes? Does that make us girls? Is that shameful?” 62

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

What’s in a Name?

63

What’s in a Name? “You are right, my son,” said Mercy. “I never thought about it like that....”

sl a

tio

n

“I don’t agree! This is all nonsense!” shouted Polycarp climbing the ladder to the roof. “Tony, pass me those tiles!”

an

C–R–A–S–H !!!

es

e

tr

Tony, the ladder, the tiles and Polycarp all fell in one big heap!

tu

gu

Tony lay quiet and still. He was bleeding from the head. Pai had a cut on his forehead.

r

Po r

“Oh my God! Oh my God!” cried Mercy. She just stood and screamed and did not know what to do.

py

::

fo

“Peter, go call Dr. Mahendra quickly, Joanna bring some water,” Roger said.

ft

co

Peter took the water and threw it on Tony’s face. Tony opened his eyes.

D

ra

“Oh, thank God, Tony, I thought you were dead!” cried Joanna dramatically. She quickly brought some cloth and water from the house to wash Tony’s wound. 64

What’s in a Name? Then she stopped. “I think we should wait for the doctor,” she said.

sl a

tio

n

Roger came to look. He saw the gaping gash on Tony’s head. “You are right,” he said. “We should wait for the doctor. Go wash Pai’s wound, Joanna.”

es

e

tr

an

Polycarp was sitting up by then. “Don’t worry, bai* ,” he said. “Let’s carry Tony inside the house and out of the sun.”

Po r

tu

gu

They carried Tony inside the house. Mercy gave him some sweet tea to drink. “The sweet tea will help him recover from the shock,” she told Joanna. Then she drank some herself. Poor Mercy was in shock too.

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Dr. Mahendra had to come in from Pernem, but he came quite quickly. He examined Tony and said that he would have to suture the gash. “It is not too bad, Tony. I think you just fainted in fright,” said the doctor. Will the

D

ra

“Ha!” said Tony, “I was not frightened. stitches hurt a lot?” * bai

= a young girl is called bai

65

What’s in a Name?

tio

n

“Not much, Shanya* . I will give you something to dull the pain,” Dr. Mahendra said. All the children loved Dr. Mahendra. He was kind and always told them the truth.

e

tr

an

sl a

An hour later all was quiet. Everyone was sitting around and discussing the accident. Tony had a nice, white bandage on his head. “You look just like a soldier,” said Peter enviously.

tu

gu

es

Joanna sat quietly near her father, putting cold packs on his forehead.

Po r

“Joanna,” whispered Polycarp. “Yes, Pai† ,” she answered.

::

fo

r

“You know, you can do all the boy things you want from today and you can study all you want.”

co

py

“Oh thank you, Pai. Why do you say that?”

D

ra

ft

“Because I know, at heart, you will always be a beautiful girl and one day you will make some lucky man a wonderful wife.” * Shanya † Pai

= smart child, a term of affection = father

66

What’s in a Name?

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

She smiled shyly at Roger who was showing her a ‘Thumbs Up’ sign!

67

tio

n olfsky Polfsky Was a little boy He sang to himself Because he was coy

py

::

fo

r

Po r

H

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Holfsky Polfsky Comes to Goa

D

ra

ft

co

His mother from Ukraine Was a belly dancer His father Inacio Was a football bouncer

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

Holfsky Polfsky Comes to Goa

69

Holfsky Polfsky Comes to Goa

sl a

tio

n

So Holfsky Polfsky Was a little boy Who wanted to sing But he was oh so coy

gu

es

e

tr

an

Then he learnt a mando* From Eric and Mimosa It was a lovely song Called Tambde Rosa†

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

Every day they sang In the old tin shed sometimes they were joined By Apolina and Fred

D

ra

ft

co

py

Now Holfsky Polfsky Was a real Goan boy He laughed and sang And was not so coy * Mando

= a popular Konkani song-dance Rosa = famous Goan Konkani song

† Tambde

70

n tio

on the hill in Pedem, Mapusa, there is a very large sports stadium.

tu

IGH

Po r

H

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go!

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Children under twelve were sprinting on the track, in one corner, boys and girls in white were having a cricket match, two boys were being coached in high jump and some college boys were dribbling a ball on the basketball court. In the Olympic-size swimming pool you could hear children splashing.

D

A large banner announced an All Goa Sports Meet. Around the stadium there are stone benches where families come with their babies, and senior citizens

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go! sit and enjoy watching all the children play.

sl a

tio

n

Into this flurry of activity walked a newcomer. Who was he? He was a bright little boy, with shining eyes, curly black hair, a button nose and a wide smile. His name was Myron.

es

e

tr

an

Felicia and Adrian were senior citizens who went there every day with their friends. They were the ones who brought Myron to the stadium

tu

gu

“Who’s this little shanya* ?” asked Nita Bai, their friend, who met them there.

fo

r

Po r

“He’s my grand-nephew,” Felicia replied. “My niece and family have come from Hyderabad to stay with us for a month.”

py

::

“My name is Myron, M-Y-R-O-N,” spelled the little boy. Everyone laughed.

ra

ft

co

“I can see that you can spell, so you must be in school, right, Myron?” asked Nita Bai.

D

“Yes,” said Myron. “I go to The Nawab New English School. I’m in KG II, my teacher’s name is Shirin. * shanya

= smart child

72

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go! May I have some chonne* please?” he said, looking at the chonnekar† at the gate.

an

sl a

tio

n

Uncle Adrian went out and bought a pudi‡ of chonne. He spread his large checked handkerchief on the park bench, poured the chonne on it and said, “Here Myron, have some.”

tu

gu

es

e

tr

“Thank you.” Myron first picked the large brown chonne, then the smaller ones and finally he crunched on the very small hard ones. He soon finished them all.

Po r

“Now, do you want to play ball?” Felicia asked.

::

fo

r

“You know I can’t run,” Myron frowned. Myron had a limp. His right leg was shorter than his left and he wore special shoes.

ft

co

py

“Perhaps I can teach you,” said Adrian, once who was a cricket champ. He soon taught Myron some simple warm-up exercises. * chonne

ra

= gram = man who sells gram ‡ pudi = small packet, made of old newspaper

D

† chonnekar

73

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go!

74

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go!

n

The next day they were back again. Felicia, who was a retired school teacher, said, “Run to that pole and back.”

tio

“Will no one laugh?” Myron asked.

tr

an

sl a

Just as he said that, a boy who was doing high jumps crashed into the bar and fell. No one laughed. So Myron got up slowly....

tu

gu

es

e

“Ready, steady, GO!” shouted Adrian. Myron ran as fast as he could and then limped back slowly. “One minute and twenty seconds. Not bad, Myron!”

Po r

“Now rest a bit and try again,” said Felicia.

fo

r

“Do you think I can do it in less than a minute?” asked Myron doubtfully.

py

::

“Of course, in a few days you will, you will!” said Felicia encouragingly.

D

ra

ft

co

The next day, Myron was back. “May I have a pudi of chonne please? I think it makes me run faster,” he said. Adrian smiled and bought him some chonne. Very soon he finished his chonne and was ready to run. 75

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go! “Ready, steady, GO!” shouted Adrian. Myron ran in fifty-five seconds.

sl a

tio

n

Mr. Desai, a friend of Adrian’s, came to watch. “I’ll bring my stopwatch tomorrow so we can see the exact time.”

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

So, every day Myron ate his chonne and ran. Mr. Desai timed him, Adrian encouraged him, and very soon the athletic coach took an interest and guided him. After his work hours he came to Myron. “When I say ‘On your mark’, bend forward with your fingers on the ground and one knee stretched back. When I say ‘Get Set’, rise slightly. When I blow my whistle, run! Try as much as you can to touch your bad foot’s toe to the ground.”

co

py

::

As Myron ran, the coach shouted, “Bend back, and kick your feet! You’re good!”

ra

ft

Very soon Myron was running a hundred meters in 30 seconds.

D

“Would you like to enter the Special Events next week?” the coach asked. 76

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go! “Can I?” asked Myron eagerly. “But I am not from Goa.”

sl a

tio

n

“It doesn’t matter,” said the coach, “you are in Goa now. But I shall need your parents to sign a form and a doctor’s certificate to say that you are fit to run.”

an

“We will see to it,” said Felicia.

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

The next Saturday, Myron’s parents, Felicia, Adrian, Aunty Nita, the chonnekar and Mr. Desai all came to see Myron in his new shorts and shirt get ready for the Special Athletic Meet. There were other special children too who were physically challenged. Everyone was ready.

::

fo

r

“On your mark, Get set. . . Peewee.” The coach blew the whistle.

py

Adrian and Mr. Desai were shouting, “Go Myron, go!” Myron’s mum were biting their Myron’s dad was jumping up and

D

ra

ft

co

Felicia and fingernails. down.

“Oh please don’t let him be last,” prayed Felicia with her eyes closed. She heard a cheer. She opened 77

On Your Mark... Get Set... Go!

sl a

tio

n

her eyes.... Myron came second from twenty children under the age of twelve. He was so proud of his silver medal. He showed it to everyone. All congratulated him and picked him up and hugged him. They were all so proud.

tr

an

He went to the coach and shook hands with him saying, “Thank you very much, Coach.”

gu

es

e

“I was happy to help and I am really proud of you,” said the coach. “A silver medal!”

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

“But my real silver medals are here,” he said, hugging the silver-haired Felicia and Adrian as they sat on the park bench.

78

n tio

go see Harry Potter in Panjim tomorrow?” asked Nicole.

gu

UM , CAN WE

tu

“M

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Ciné Magic

Po r

“Yes, please, please!” begged little Sam. He had heard all about Harry Potter from Nicole.

py

::

fo

r

“My friends Chetana and Serena want to go too. Will you take us, Mum? It is a school holiday,” Nicole added.

D

ra

ft

co

“I really cannot, Nicole. I have a meeting at four o’clock and we just may not make it in time for the six o’clock show,” said Leticia, their mother. “Oooh no,” sighed Nicole and Sam together.

Ciné Magic

an

sl a

tio

n

“I will take you,” said Grandpa Salu, putting down his newspaper. “I will pay for all your friends too. But we must go by bus because Mum and Dad are both busy.” Grandpa Salu often came from his home in Malar, on Divar Island, to spend a few days with his daughter and family in Dona Paula.

es

e

tr

“Yes, yes, of course!” shouted the children. “Thank you, Pai* , ” said Nicole, “and the tickets are cheaper for children.”

r

Po r

tu

gu

“Here, give this to your dad and tell him to book the tickets,” said Grandpa, holding out a one hundred rupee note. Nicole looked shocked and then turned to her mother.

co

py

::

fo

“Ticket prices have gone up since your day, Pai,” Leticia said smiling. “For this show it is Rs 175, but otherwise it is Rs 250 per ticket. But don’t worry, I will buy the tickets.”

D

ra

ft

“250...250...250...” muttered Grandpa. “And how much does ice-cream cost in the theatre?” he asked. “Only Rs 50 for an ice lolly,” said Sam. * Pai

= father, but here it is grandfather

80

Ciné Magic Leticia laughed as grandfather began, “In my day....”

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

Both the children picked up their glasses of milk and their jam sandwiches and went to their grandfather. “Tell us about your days, Pai,” they both said. They loved to hear grandfather’s old stories. They sat on the long arms of his special easy chair that his daughter kept for him.

gu

es

e

“Were you allowed to watch all the matches on TV, Pai?” Sam asked.

Po r

tu

“Ha! Ha!” laughed Pai. “There was no TV in my day. There was no TV in India till 1973. I was already forty years old then and had three children!”

::

fo

r

“Did you have a theatre and did you go to see movies in Goa, Pai?” asked Nicole.

ra

ft

co

py

“Of course we had theatres and I loved to go to see movies on a Sunday afternoon. We had movies only twice a week and not four shows a day, like you do now,” Grandfather said.

D

“Who took you to the movies?” Sam wanted to know.

81

Ciné Magic “Nobody took me. When cinema theatres opened in Goa, I was old enough to go on my own.”

n

“How old were you, Pai?” Nicole asked.

an

sl a

tio

“I was over twenty-one years old. I took my parents sometimes. Sometimes I went with friends and sometimes with my girlfriend,” grandfather said.

tr

“You had a girlfriend!” asked Sam in a shocked voice.

gu

es

e

“Don’t be silly, Sam. That was Mai* , wasn’t it Pai?” asked Nicole.

Po r

tu

“Of course, it was,” said grandfather, and looked up to see his daughter grinning at him.

fo

r

“And she lived in Mapusa,” Mama Leticia added.

py

::

“Where was the theatre Pai? What was your favourite movie?” Nicole wanted to know.

D

ra

ft

co

“Oh, I took my parents to see The Ten Commandments and they loved it. My mother cried sometimes and we were all wonderstruck with the Red Sea parting and making a path for the * Mai

= mother. Here it is grandmother.

82

Ciné Magic

n

Israelites to pass. In those days there were no special effects and digital photography. But my favourite movie was Show Boat.”

tio

“What is a showboat?” asked Sam.

an

sl a

“Oh, like you have the casino boats on the Mandovi River. But this was a wonderful romantic story.”

tr

“Which theatre did you go to, Pai?” Nicole asked.

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

“There was a Ciné Naçional in Panjim; I usually went to Central Talkies in Mapusa. When you entered, it was like magic,” whispered grandfather. “ It was dark but you could see the red velvet curtain in front of the screen. There were only hard wooden benches where I sat. They were the cheaper tickets for 75 paise. But the excitement of sitting there! The balcony seats were one rupee and fifty paise. Sometimes I sat there when I took your Mai.”

D

ra

ft

“Tell them about the rain, Pai,” said Leticia.

83

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

Ciné Magic

84

Ciné Magic

sl a

tio

n

“Oh yes, the theatre was in the center of Mapusa. It was a big shed with a tin roof. So when it rained it went ‘Pata pata, PATA PATA. . . . PPAAAATTTTAAAAA!’ and then we could not hear a thing!” and both the children burst out laughing.

es

e

tr

an

“But that’s not all,” continued grandfather. “Sometimes the rain was so heavy that we had to open our umbrellas because there were always leaky spots in the roof.”

Po r

tu

gu

“You opened your umbrellas inside?” asked Nicole, looking very shocked indeed.

::

fo

r

“Yes,” laughed grandfather. “And that was not all. As soon as the umbrellas opened, people began to shout out ‘Bos re! Bos re!’* So we could not hear a thing!

ft

co

py

Sometimes people got up and stood on the sides so that they could see. Then the man handling the reels would get so upset that he would stop the movie.”

D

ra

“He stopped the movie?” asked Sam. “But you had paid to see it!” * Bos

re! = Sit down!

85

Ciné Magic

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

“I know. Then he would start it again when people shouted. Often he got confused and started all over again, which we all loved. But sometimes he placed the reel wrongly and the picture would show upside down! Then again people would shout: Kitem korta re! Kitem korta re!* And sometimes people would actually turn their necks to try and see the movie upside down! But it was great fun and because there was no TV for us to see live action stories, the movie theatre was really magic. We saw far-away places, cowboy shootings, wild animals and romantic songs and sets,” said Grandpa smiling.

fo

r

“Thank you Pai,” said both the children hugging their grandfather.

py

::

“Now you will take us to the cinema tomorrow. . . ” began Nicole.

D

ra

ft

co

“And you will make magic for us,” said Sam.

* Kitem

korta re! = What are you doing!

86

n tio

es

e

tr

an

sl a

The Rose Garden

was seven years old. He loved playing football with the big boys in the field next to his house at Fatorda. Fatorda had a large football stadium but next to it was a field where everyone played. Francisco went there every day. His sisters played Catch-Me-If-You-Can and cricket with their friends.

gu

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

F

RANCISCO

D

ra

ft

co

One evening Francisco came back very tired and hot. He ran to the gurgulet* for a glass of cool water. Then he washed his face. He looked at himself in the mirror above the basin. “Look, Mum, I have zimmers on my face!” he shouted. * gurgulet,

gurguret or modko = clay water pot

The Rose Garden Kanchan, his mum, came running “What? Where?” she asked.

tio

n

“Here on my face, can you see zimmers?” Francis asked.

an

sl a

“You are only flushed from the heat, Francisco. What are zimmers anyway?” she asked.

es

e

tr

“I think they are red spots,” said Francisco, confidently.

tu

gu

“Who told you that, Francisco? Are you making up stories?”

fo

r

Po r

“No, Mum, I heard the doctor tell Dad that Avo* had all zimmers. I know he has red spots on his hands from looking after his roses.”

ra

ft

co

py

::

“Oh, Francisco!” said Mum, laughing and crying at the same time. Francisco’s sisters Toffee and Jujup came in. (Those were their pet names. Their real names were Ophelia and Julita.)

D

“Francisco! Why have you made Mama cry?” Toffee demanded. * Avo

= grandfather

88

The Rose Garden “It’s okay, my darlings,” said Kanchan. “Your Avo has Alzheimer’s, not all zimmers.”

sl a

tio

n

“What’s that?” asked all three together. “Is it like chicken pox?” asked Jujup, whose friend in school had had the chicken pox.

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

“No, it is not. As some people grow old, some cells in their brain get old too and fade away. So they begin to forget. Every month they remember less and less. And some days they remember most things. But they forget names and places. They cannot be sent out alone.”

fo

r

“Oh, poor, poor Avo,” said Toffee with large tears rolling down her cheeks.

::

“Will he forget the way home?” asked Francisco.

ft

co

py

“Yes, he may,” said Mum. “That is why Mai has helped him start the rose garden. He is very good at looking after flowers and it keeps him happy.”

D

ra

“Will Mai get Alzheimer’s too?” asked Francisco. “Not everyone gets it,” said Kanchan.

89

The Rose Garden

tio

n

“I don’t think she will,” chirped Jujup, “she remembers all my exam marks and Francisco’s football scores and Toffee’s piano pieces. She is very sharp.”

an

sl a

“Yes,” laughed Kanchan, “just like you. Sharp as a pencil point!”

e

tr

“May we go to Socorro this Sunday to see Mai and Avo?” asked Francisco.

tu

gu

es

“Yes, we will ask Dada to drive us all there,” Kanchan promised.

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

On the next Sunday, as promised, Kanchan and Jon drove the children to Socorro to see Jon’s parents. Mai was waiting for them at the door. “Come, come,” she said, “you must be hot and tired after the long drive. Shaila! Bring the lime juice from the fridge! Quickly!”

ra

ft

“Yumm,” said Toffee. “These must be lemons from your tree, Mai.”

D

“Here try this, chonne dos* and baath† . I knew you * chonne † baath

dos = a Goan sweet = a kind of cake

90

The Rose Garden were coming, so Shaila and I made it yesterday,” said Mai. But she got no response.

an

sl a

tio

n

“What’s the matter?” she cried. “Why are the children so quiet? Are they sick, Kanchan? I think the sun has been too hot for them. Come, lie down on the bed, come, come....”

es

e

tr

“No, Mai, we are fine but we heard that Avo is sick with Alzheimer’s,” Francisco said.

tu

gu

“What do you know about Alzheimer’s?” asked Mai, surprised.

Po r

“I told them, Ma,” said Kanchan. “So they wanted to come and meet Pa.”

::

fo

r

“Go, meet your Avo in the garden and tell me if he looks sick,” Mai said.

D

ra

ft

co

py

The children crept quietly outside. Their grandfather was smiling to himself and cutting the dead leaves. There were beautiful roses everywhere. Red and white and yellow and pink. The perfume swirled up with the breeze and the children smiled in delight.

91

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

The Rose Garden

ft

“Hi Avo!” they called.

D

ra

“Hi!” he said looking at them. For a moment he looked confused. But the children ran to him and hugged him. 92

The Rose Garden “Do you know who we are, Avo?” asked Jujup. “Shhh,” said Francisco.

sl a

tio

n

“Yes, my darling, I know who you are and you are just like the roses in my garden, bright and lovely,” Avo said and smiled.

es

e

tr

an

Francisco looked at Toffee and both of them sighed, while smiling too. “I don’t think Avo will forget us ever!” Jujup whispered.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

Yes, they would always be “All Zimmers” in Avo’s rose garden.

93

n tio

Po r

tu

gu

“Twit Twit,” said the little bird As she pecked at tiny fleas, Lady bugs and blue-black bees, And woody worms that live in trees.

es

e

tr

an

sl a

The Buffalo and the Bird

py

::

fo

r

“Twit Twit,” said the little bird As she hopped on Buffalo Rose’s head. “Thank you, thank you!” the buffalo said. “Peck these fleas before I’m bled!”

ra

ft

co

“Twit Twit,” said the little bird. “Hold still now, dear Mrs. Rose, While I get this pesky flea That’s going right up your nose!”

D

“You’re the best”, said buffalo to twit, “I must thank God for whom he sends.”

The Buffalo and the Bird

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

As she flew off, the little bird said: “Thanks, I’ll twitter that to all my friends.”

95

n tio sl a

e

tr

an

What will People Say!

walked into the room very, very quietly. It was only five o’clock in the morning and he was hungry. He crept into the kitchen and prepared to make himself a really good omelette.

es

gu

Po r

tu

K

AILASH

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

He beat up two eggs very stiffly, added just a dash of salt, some grated cheese, a splash of milk and just half a teaspoon of flour. This was his secret ingredient to make a nice thick omelette. He heated the pan on the gas, added a splat of butter and when the pan was hot, he poured in the eggs.

D

“Who’s there!” his father shouted, coming into the kitchen brandishing a hockey stick. “Kailash, I thought you were a thief!”

What will People Say!

tio

n

“Ha, ha. I am, Papa. I am hungry and making an omelette. Do you want one? I am not allowed to use the gas burner when no one is home. So, this is the best time.”

sl a

“It certainly smells good. Can you make one for me?”

tr

an

“Of course,” Kailash said. “You have this one and I’ll make another.”

es

e

“Mmm, delicious!” Papa said. “Who taught you this?”

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

“No one, I read it online. There is a programme called Junior Master Chef. It is all about young children who have this cooking competition and they have to use all the....” But Kailash could see that Papa was not listening anymore. He had picked up the newspaper and begun to read it.

co

py

“Why is everyone up so early?” said Mama, as she came into the kitchen with Kailash’s brother Tejas.

D

ra

ft

“Yummm, that smells good! Can you make me one, too?” said Tejas. “Kailash is getting to be a good cook,” Papa said.

97

What will People Say!

tio

n

“Yes, it is good to have some other interest when you grow up and become a professional doctor or lawyer. Such interests help you to relax. As I like to paint pots and you like to swim,” Mama told Papa.

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

“And I shall be a surgeon who loves to sing,” said Tejas. “Did I tell you, I am entering the Inter College Singing Competition? I have decided to sing a semi-classical Hindi song that....” But no one was listening. Papa and Mama were both reading the newspapers and Kailash was still frying omelettes. “No one ever listens in this family,” complained Tejas.

py

::

fo

r

Po r

“I heard you, Tejas,” Kailash said, bringing another plate of fluffy omelettes to the table. “I am so happy for you. Do you know that I have entered the Junior Master Chef Competition online?”

ft

co

“Wow! That’s a big one. What do Mama and Papa say about it?” Tejas wanted to know.

ra

“Nothing so far. They don’t know,” laughed Kailash.

D

“We don’t know what?” asked his mother, smiling and getting up to make some tea. 98

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

What will People Say!

99

What will People Say! “I have entered the Junior Master Chef Competition,” said Kailash.

tio

n

“Oh, is it in school? Do the boys’ schools have such competitions now?” she asked.

tr

an

sl a

“No, Ma,” Tejas spoke for Kailash. “It is a national competition and the winners go into an international competition.”

gu

es

e

“That is absolutely ridiculous! Lok kitem mhonntele* !” Mother exclaimed.

tu

Father looked up. “What is this about?” he demanded.

r

Po r

“Kailash has joined a cooking competition,” mother cried.

py

::

fo

“That is only for girls,” father said, going back to his paper.

ft

co

“I cannot allow that,” mother said. “I am a dentist and your father, a doctor. People will laugh at us.”

D

ra

“Why will people laugh?” asked Vhodli Aai† , coming in. * Lok

kitem mhonntele = What will people say? Aai = grandmother

† Vhodli

100

What will People Say! “Kailash has joined a cooking competition,” said mother.

n

“It is just a joke,” father added.

an

sl a

tio

“It is not,” Kailash said. “I want to be a professional chef when I grow up. If I stand in the first three in this competition, any catering college will accept me.”

es

e

tr

“Are you out of your mind?” father roared. “How will I face my patients?”

Po r

Lok kitem mhonntele?” Vhodli

r

“No, Raja† , no! Aai said.

tu

gu

“I shall be the laughing stock of the mahila parishad* !” Mother wailed.

fo

Kailash quietly left the room.

co

py

::

“Just cancel your entry, Kailash,” his mother cried after him.

D

ra

ft

As Kailash left the room, his younger sister, Uma, walked in. “What’s the buzz, bro?” she asked. She was dressed in tight jeans, a tank top and her hair was * mahila † Raja

parishad = women’s group = an affectionate petname, meaning king

101

What will People Say! done in hundreds of tiny braids with shining, coloured bands.

n

Kailash grinned at her. “You’re in for it,” he warned.

sl a

tio

“Uma!” shouted mother and father together. “What have you done to yourself?”

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

“No sweat, folks,” she smiled. “Today is music day in school and I am a rock star. Where’s my guitar?” she asked no one in particular and walked out of the room. Her grandmother and parents just stared in shocked silence. Her brother Tejas winked at her. He loved his little sister’s spirit.

py

::

fo

r

Kailash walked slowly to school. “What shall I do? What shall I do?” he wondered. “I really want to be a chef! And I don’t care what people say!!” he shouted out loudly.

ft

co

“You don’t care about what?” his friend Jonathan asked, coming up behind him.

D

ra

Kailash told him the whole story about his parents’ reaction to his becoming a chef. “You’ve got to talk to them, man,” Jonathan said. 102

What will People Say! “How? How? How?” Kailash asked, but they’d reached the school and had to go in.

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

That evening, Kailash’s Ashok Mama* , came to visit. The boys were very fond of Ashok Mama. He was young and broadminded. So before his parents came home, Kailash told Ashok of his dream to become a chef and his parents saying “lok kitem mhonntele?”

es

e

“Always take one step at a time,” Ashok said.

gu

“What do you mean?” Kailash asked.

Po r

tu

“We cannot change our culture and our parents overnight. So I will request them to let you join the competition, okay?”

fo

r

“Okay!” said Kailash with a smile.

co

py

::

“And then, we will take it from there. Let us see how you do,” Ashok said.

D

ra

ft

So Kailash entered the competition and came second. He was then selected for the national level competition. * Mama

= maternal uncle, mother’s brother

103

What will People Say! The next morning, he was in the kitchen again, making dosas with Manchurian chicken filling.

tio

n

“Mmmm, that smells good,” his father said, coming in. “May I have some?”

an

sl a

“Of course, I made some for everyone. And some Manchurian paneer ones for Vhodli Aai.”

es

e

tr

“What, what... mmmm... what did you make for me?” Vhodli Aai asked.

tu

gu

“I am going shopping. Does anyone need anything urgently?” said Mum coming in.

Po r

“We are out of rava* ,” said Vhodli Aai. asked

fo

r

“Mum, can you please buy me a spatula?” Kailash timidly.

co

py

::

“Buy a spatula now? I’ve been cooking for more than twenty years and never had to use one.”

ft

“It will help me make better omelettes.”

D

ra

“Oh, alright then, I’ll buy one,” his mother said. “One step gone,” said Kailash to himself. * rava

= semolina

104

What will People Say!

n

“Hey brother, I’m sure you will do great in the next competition,” said Tejas, entering the kitchen. “A Manchurian Dosa! What next?”

sl a

tio

“Wait and see!” said Kailash, smiling. “We can change the world, one step at a time.”

es

e

tr

an

“Sure we can!” said Uma, dancing into the kitchen in cut-off jeans, Kailash’s old shirt tied in a knot at her waist and a guitar in her hand. Then

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

Kailash and Tejas both burst out laughing. everyone joined in.

105

n tio

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Where’s that Puppy Going?

was a dull morning in the village of Nuvem. Little Xavier had chased the pigs, watered the vegetable garden with his granny, played with his ball and was now bored.

gu

tu

Po r

I

T

co

py

::

fo

r

He looked around. What could he do? Everyone was at school and he would only start school next June. It was lonely. Suddenly he spied a little white puppy with a brown patch, running past his gate.

ft

“Wait, doggy, wait!” he cried. “Where are you going?”

D

ra

Xavier ran after the little puppy. Eva called from her gate as he passed by, “Hi Xavier, where are you going?”

Where is that Puppy Going? “I don’t know,” said Xavier, “I am following the puppy.” Eva followed Xavier and the puppy.

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

On the way they passed Gita’s posro* . Gita’s son, Viraj, was sitting on the counter top. “Where are you going, Xavier?” he asked. “I don’t know,” Xavier answered. “I am following this puppy.” So Viraj followed Xavier and Eva and the puppy.

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

As they all ran, they saw Asif playing by himself in the field. “Hey, where are you going, Xavier?” “Look, look, I am following the puppy. He is going somewhere,” cried Xavier. Asif followed Xavier and Eva and Viraj and the puppy.

::

fo

r

Betina was skipping with a piece of rope near the well. “Hey, where are you going, Xavier?” she called.

co

py

“I don’t know,” he answered. “Come and see.”

ra

ft

So Betina threw down her rope and followed Xavier and Eva and Viraj and Asif and the puppy. = a little shop

D

* posro

107

Where is that Puppy Going?

n

Just down the street, were the twins, Asha and Usha. “Where ’e goin’? Where ’e goin’?” they wanted to know. “Can we come, can we come?”

sl a

tio

“No,” said Xavier, “you are too small and I don’t know where this puppy is taking me.”

es

e

tr

an

“We comin’, we comin’,” they chanted together and followed Xavier and Eva and Viraj and Asif and Betina and the puppy.

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

Pedro, the baker, looked out of his bakery window. He had just put a batch of bread in the oven. Big loaves, small pao* , kakon† , poyo‡ , and nowadays children wanted hamburger buns and croissants, so he baked those too. “Hey,” he called out, “where are all you children going?”

D

ra

ft

co

py

But the children just kept looking ahead and following the puppy. They did not notice that the puppy had entered a door. They all followed. “Hello, children, have you come to see me?” * pao

= Goan bread = crisp bread rings ‡ poyo = Goan bread made from bran

† kakon

108

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

Where is that Puppy Going?

109

Where is that Puppy Going?

n

All the children looked up and there was Dr. Uday smiling at them. “No!” they all cried together. “We are not sick!”

tr

an

sl a

tio

“Thank you for bringing my little puppy, Lapit, back. He is always running off.” he laughed. Both the twins, Asha and Usha began to cry. “We no want in-jection!” they yelled.

es

e

“But I am not that kind of doctor. I am a dentist.”

tu

gu

“Yes, I know,” said Xavier. “You filled my tooth when I had a cavity.”

Po r

“What’s a cavity?” asked Eva.

::

fo

r

“Come, I will show you, but first let me call your mother, Xav, and tell her to inform all the mothers that you are here.

ft

co

py

Now, I will send Lapit home with my secretary. “Carmine, will you take Lapit up to my apartment and tell my wife to give him some milk, please?”

D

ra

“Bye Lapit, Bye Lapit!” all the children called. Then Dr. Uday took the children inside his clinic. There were no patients there because he was about 110

Where is that Puppy Going? to close up for lunch.

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

“Here children, look at this screen. These are your milk teeth that you now have as children. If we do not clean our teeth properly, the teeth get rotten and get holes which are called cavities, like this,” said Dr. Uday, pointing to the screen. “Then they have to be filled with cement or fibre glass.”

gu

es

e

“Ha, ha, just like a building,” laughed Asif, whose father was a builder.

fo

r

Po r

tu

“Yes, and I have to see that I build it strong or the tooth will get very rotten and will have to be pulled out. So you must brush your teeth after you eat and brush them correctly.”

::

“Don’t want to pull out my teeth,” sobbed Eva.

co

py

“”No,” said Dr. Uday. “I am not going to. So don’t eat too many sweets and clean your teeth properly, okay?”

ra

ft

“Okay Dr. Uday,” they all said.

D

Then Dr. Uday gave each of them a leaflet with pictures showing them how to brush their teeth and also a new toothbrush and a tube of toothpaste each. 111

Where is that Puppy Going?

tio

n

“Thank you Dr. Uday,” said Xavier. All the children said, “Thank you Dr. Uday. And say thanks to Lapit too. He brought us to you. Did you ask him to bring us?”

tr

an

sl a

“No,” laughed Dr. Uday, “but maybe he knew that you all needed to come here and have a ‘learning day’. Have a good day, children.”

gu

es

e

“Have a good day, Dr. Uday,” said the children as they all walked home. “Where did you

Po r

tu

“Hey!” called Pedro the baker. children all go?”

Uday,” said

fo

r

“We followed the puppy and met Dr. Xavier.

py

::

“And he told us that we can get holes in our teeth,” said Betina.

co

“But they can be filled with fibre glass,” said Asif.

ra

ft

“Only if they are very bad,” said Viraj.

D

“I don’t want to pull out my teeth,” said Eva, crying again. 112

Where is that Puppy Going? “Look, we both got new toothbrushes,” laughed Asha and Usha.

an

sl a

tio

n

“Okay, okay,” said Pedro. “Here is a nice, warm, crisp kakon for each of you. It will make your teeth strong.” Pedro gave them each a kakon and they shouted, “Thank you, Uncle Pedro!”

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

And just like that, the morning was gone. A nice, fun morning too. All because of a brown and white puppy called Lapit.

113

n tio

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Silence in the Classroom

a silent September day. Flavia, Sushma and Amya sat under the tamarind tree with the rest of their class.

gu

tu

Po r

I

T WAS

::

fo

r

No classroom? No, their small school in Palolem was washed away when there were flash floods and the river overflowed its banks in Canacona in South Goa.

py

“Read us a new lesson, Teacher,” begged Flavia.

D

ra

ft

co

“I’m sorry children, but all our books were destroyed by the flood. Look around you.We are lucky that no lives were lost in our village.” The children looked around and sighed. Bricks, benches, clothes, rotting leaves and broken clay pots

Silence in the Classroom

tio

n

lay all around them. Sushma spotted a brightly coloured sari flying like a flag from a tree. “Can’t we do something with all this?” she asked, pointing to all the debris.

tr

an

sl a

“Puppets!” shouted all the children together. Their teacher had taught them to make puppets before the flood.

gu

es

e

“We can make hundreds of puppets and sell them,” said Dev.

Po r

tu

“You are always a businessman, Dev. Why can’t we have a puppet show?” Sushma asked. “Good idea, I’ll write the story,” said Flavia.

::

fo

r

“Yes Flavia, you are a great story teller,” Sameer said. “And may I help Satish do the props?”

D

ra

ft

co

py

“Children, children. Let’s think this through,” said Teacher. “Everything must be planned well. First collect all the material that can be used. I’ll help Flavia with her story. Sushma, you collect a team to make the puppets. Dev, you, Satish and Amya do the sets.” 115

ft

ra

D py

co :: r

fo

e

es

gu

tu

Po r

n

tio

sl a

an

tr

Silence in the Classroom

116

Silence in the Classroom “But Amya is a girl!” wailed Dev.

n

“But I’m good with sets, you know that!” smirked Amya, giving Dev a friendly blow on his arm.

sl a

tio

“And who will pay to come to the show?” asked Teacher. “We have all lost so much.”

tr

an

The children were silent and sad. Truly, who would pay?

gu

es

e

Dev’s father, who was repairing his house nearby, heard the teacher. “I think I have an idea,” he said.

Po r

tu

The children ran and dragged him under the tree. “Tell us, tell us!” they begged.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

“There are buses coming in from town every day,” he said. “I know many people from the town as I go there to repair their houses. You make colourful tickets and I will sell them to the townspeople. Have your show on Saturday afternoon so that they can come on the bus and go back when the bus returns at 5 pm. How’s that for an idea?” “Three cheers for Dev’s papa!” shouted the children. “Hip, hip, hooray!” 117

Silence in the Classroom “Now, who will make the tickets and how much will we charge?” asked Dev.

tio

n

“I think we should have it on the bank of the river. We must tell the river we are still friends,” said Teacher.

an

sl a

“But the river did not behave itself, Teacher,” complained little Elijah.

gu

es

e

tr

“Yes, my dear, but if we treat it with respect and be careful not to throw rubbish in the water, the river will behave.”

Po r

tu

“Okay Teacher, I will tell everyone to be a friend to the river,” said Elijah.

::

fo

r

All the children got busy. It took two weeks before and after school to make the puppets and then to build a small platform with the help of Dev’s papa.

D

ra

ft

co

py

The story was about the flood, and thanking God for saving their lives. Every child took part in the play. It ended with a song and dance of joy and celebration. The children had to practice different voices and learn to make the puppets move.

118

Silence in the Classroom “Do I sound like a raging river?” asked Satish in a gruff voice. Everyone laughed.

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

Aren was the Wind and he went “Whooooo,” all over the place. Neeharika and Nessa did “Swishhhhh, swishhhhh,” for palm trees in the wind. Dishal and Suhail went “Pata, pata, pata,” like raindrops on the roof.

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

Samaira and Elijah were the Sun. They sizzled with a “Sizzzzz, sizzzz,” as the wet ground dried. Trisha and Dhruv were stars that sang “Twinkle, twinkle,” when the flood was over. There was so much fun and laughter as all the children practiced their parts and put up the sets and juggled the puppets.

py

::

fo

It was a noisy October day, that Saturday. The stage was set. When would the bus come?

ft

co

“Is it 3.30 already?” cried Amya, “I don’t think the bus is coming.”

ra

“It’s coming! It’s coming!” the others shouted.

D

“Ponk! Ponk!! Ponk! Ponk!!” went the bus as it rolled into the village square. Men, women and 119

Silence in the Classroom

sl a

tio

n

children tumbled out dressed in festive colours to sit on broken school benches, borrowed chairs, tree stumps and mats in front of the stage. All parents were invited free of charge. So they helped Teacher and the children wherever they could.

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

Teacher made a short speech. “Thank you everyone for coming. By being here you are encouraging our children. We shall now have some money to buy a few books. But most important of all, you have helped us all to bring laughter and hope into our lives again. Now let us begin.”

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

The audience sat delighted. How well the children played their parts! How clever were the little puppeteers! How dramatic was the stage! Yes, yes, the play was a great success. The children had also made extra puppets for sale. As Teacher was helping to clear up, a stylish young woman came up to her. She was dressed in a beautiful silk sari and had a big red bindi* . “Excuse me,” she said, “my name is Barbra Naidu. I am a journalist and I would like to make a * bindi

= a traditional decoration worn by women on the forehead

120

Silence in the Classroom small contribution towards your library.” Teacher was so touched that tears came to her eyes.

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

“Why have you made my teacher cry?” asked Satish in his best gruff voice. “I am not crying, Satish, I am just so happy,” Teacher said. “It was really all the children’s idea. They want to study. They know the importance of education.”

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

Barbra Naidu wrote an article about the school in a national magazine. It was soon posted on the internet. Many people read it and sent cheques. Goans from all over the world wanted to help. NGOs collected second-hand books. Very soon, the children of Palolem in Canacona had not only books for a new library, but they also had enough money to build a small school building.

D

ra

ft

co

On Opening Day, the children sent Barbra Naidu a special invitation to be chief guest. “Three cheers for Ms. Naidu! Three cheers for Teacher! Three cheers for all of us!” the children shouted. “Hip, hip, hooray!”

121

n tio

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Yakira Finds Another Home

came from England with her grandfather, Mervyn, to his ancestral house in Salvador do Mundo. He needed to see to some repair work on the house. “What will Yakira do in a village in Goa?” his wife Elsie asked Mervyn. “She is only ten years old.”

tu

Po r

::

fo

r

Y

AKIRA

co

py

“Don’t worry, grandma, I will look after grandpa, clean the house and do some gardening,” said Yakira.

D

ra

ft

But do you think that Yakira did just that? Oh no. She did look after her grandpa and serve him his dinner, but all day she was out discovering the village. Her grandfather’s friend Gaspar, who lived

Yakira Finds Another Home

an

sl a

tio

n

across from them, had a grandson, Darrel. There was a girl, Sonali, about Yakira’s age, who lived next door. Sonali’s mother helped Mervyn by cooking and cleaning for him when he came to Goa. Sonali came too. “Do you want to come and play lobbi* with me,” she asked.

e

tr

“Yeah, come on,” said Yakira, “show me how!” They both went out into the garden.

tu

gu

es

Just then Darrel called out to them, “Coming fishing by the river?”

Po r

“Oh yes!” they both shouted.

“Do you have fishing rods?” Yakira asked.

::

fo

r

“Yes,” laughed Darrel, “but these rods are specially cut from bamboo and we use small prawns for bait.”

ra

ft

co

py

“Chol re! chol re† !” called Manjunath and Joaquim coming to the garden gate with their fishing tackle. “Are these girls coming too?”

D

* lobbi † Chol

= a game of seven-tiles re! = come on

123

Yakira Finds Another Home “Yes,” said Gopal joining them. “My sister Gauri is coming too.”

tio

n

Yakira’s face lit up with excitement. She ran to tell her grandfather.

tr

an

sl a

“Look after yourselves, and take a hat, Yakira. You are not used to the sun,” Mervyn called out. Yakira grabbed her hat and ran.

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

Soon they were sitting in the weeds by the stream. “Keep very silent,” warned Joaquim, “or the fish won’t bite.” Yakira and Sonali shared a rod. The grass began to tickle, a fly sat on Sonali’s nose, a bee buzzed near Yakira’s ear and suddenly they both began to giggle. Joaquim glared at them. “Shhhh,” he whispered.

D

ra

ft

co

py

“I’m hungry,” said little Gauri, looking around as if some food would suddenly come down the river. “Oh, she is always hungry,” said Gopal. “Here, I brought some bananas and chickoos. But we must share them with everyone.”

124

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

Yakira Finds Another Home

D

ra

“Wait, I have some money,” said Darrel, “I’ll run to the gadda* outside the church and get some biscuits.” He * gadda

= small shop, often on wheels

125

Yakira Finds Another Home ran off.

n

“Look at that canoe there. Is it a fishing boat?” asked Yakira.

an

sl a

tio

“Yes,” said Manjunath. “It is going to the next village, which is a fishing village called Ekoshim. Have you sailed in a boat or on a ship, Yakira?” he asked.

gu

es

e

tr

“No,” said Yakira very seriously. “My grandfather told me a very sad story and it made me very frightened. I never want to sit in any boat.”

fo

r

Po r

tu

“What story? Tell us,” said Darrel coming up with a paper packet of biscuits. All the children put down their fishing rods and turned to Yakira as they ate the biscuits and fruit.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

“My grandfather was one of six children. The older three were boys and they were all in boarding school in Aldona, Goa. His father worked in East Africa. He was an engine driver there. He was on his way to Africa by ship with his wife and three younger children.” “Did he drive a real train?” asked Gopal, who thought 126

Yakira Finds Another Home this a very exciting job. “Yes,” said Yakira.

tio

n

“Don’t interrupt, Gopal,” scolded Sonali.

tr

an

sl a

Yakira continued, “They went in a big ship. It was called The Tilawa. One very dark, and rainy night just two days after they left, there was a terrible sound and the whole ship shook!”

gu

es

e

“Oooh, I am afraid of the dark too,” said Gauri, going close to her brother.

Po r

tu

“My grandfather tells me that it was during the Second World War,” Yakira told them.

fo

r

“Oh yes, I studied about the two World Wars,” said Darrel. “Why did the ship shake, Yakira?

py

::

“Because the ship was hit by a torpedo.”

co

“Aahh!” gasped Gopal. “A real torpedo?”

ra

ft

“What is a torpedo?” Gauri wanted to know.

D

“A torpedo is like a small rocket bomb that is shot from a submarine. And a submarine is a boat that goes under water, Gauri,” said Gopal glaring at her. 127

Yakira Finds Another Home “But how does it go under water?” Gauri asked.

n

“I’ll tell you later,” said Gopal. “Then what happened, Yakira?”

tr

an

sl a

tio

“They were asked to go to the lifeboats and save themselves. My great grandfather was on the deck trying to put the baby to sleep. Everyone was shouting: “RUN! JUMP!!”

es

e

“And did they jump?” Manjunath asked

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

“No. My great-grandfather refused to go because his children were only four years, two years and a three-months old baby. So he ran to the cabin instead. He held my great-grandmother and all his children very close.”

::

“And then?” the children all asked.

D

ra

ft

co

py

“That is when the next torpedo struck,” Yakira continued in a very soft voice. “The ship sank and all those left on the ship died. My grandfather’s family was gone.” Yakira had tears in her eyes, and so did Sonali and Gauri.

128

Yakira Finds Another Home “How did the family in Goa know what happened on the ship?” asked Darrel.

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

“They found the cabin boy who helped my grandfather’s family. They found him in a hospital in Bombay. He told them the story. He had gone with great-grandfather to the cabin. He said that my great-grandfather forced him to go and jump. He was a good swimmer.”

tu

gu

es

“And of course your great-grandparents could not jump with three small babies,” said Sonali.

Po r

“Were many people saved?” asked Joaquim.

py

::

fo

r

“I really don’t know,” said Yakira. “But my grandfather said that they discovered many Goan brides were going to Africa with their new husbands and many of them drowned.”

ft

co

“That is really a sad story, Yakira,” said Sonali. “No wonder you do not want to sit in a boat.”

D

ra

“Yes, my grandfather and his brothers were sad for a long time. After I heard his story, I feel that I want to stay by his side all the time... and... I am also afraid 129

Yakira Finds Another Home to go in any boat,” Yakira said.

n

“But he would be sad if he knew that. He is a very brave man and a successful man,” said Manjunath.

sl a

tio

“Yes, I am,” said Mervyn coming up to them. “Has Yakira been telling you about my parents?”

an

“Yes,” they whispered.

es

e

tr

“But now Yakira is frightened to go on any boat,” said Darrel.

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

“I didn’t know that,” said Mervyn. “Tomorrow, we will all go on the ferry from Pomburpa to Chorao. I will tell Kashinath the fisherman to come with us. He is a fearless fisherman and we will all be with you. I will hold your hand all the way.”

py

::

“Will you hold my hand too Uncle Mervyn?” Gauri asked.

co

“Of course I will,” Mervyn said.

ra

ft

“And we will take a picnic lunch,” Sonali said.

D

“Yeah!” all the children shouted. “Let us go ask our parents.” Yakira smiled. She was happy that she had come to Goa. This was like home away from home. 130

tio

n gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

Oh Goa, I Tried to Paint a Rainy Day

tried to paint a rainy day And dipped my brush in rain, Then splattered it across my page To look like a window pane.

fo

r

Po r

tu

I

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

I looked across the deep blue sea Roaring wild and free, Then dipped my brush in indigo – Oops! I splashed my knee!

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

Oh Goa, I Tried to Paint a Rainy Day

132

Oh Goa, I Tried to Paint a Rainy Day

tio sl a

an

es

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

I tried to paint a rainy day Before I went to bed, So I could take it in to school, But I’ve painted me instead.

e

tr

I painted pebbles and some sea shells, Crabs crawling in neat rows; I bent to see if the colour matched – Hey! I got brown paint on my nose!

n

The coconut palms are swaying low Bowing with the breeze, But as I tried to get that right Atishoo! The green paint made me sneeze.

133

n tio

J

tr

an

sl a

For parents and teachers

UST three generations ago – to me, it seems like yesterday!

fo

r

Po r

tu

gu

es

e

– Goa was alive with story tellers. From the foothills of the Western Ghats to the beaches washed by the Arabian Sea, almost every house had in it a matriarch who made it her business, as day turned into night, to gather her grandchildren around herself as she told them stories of Kolo ani Koli, Attulo ani Bittulem, Vagh Mam ani Sui Mami, and a host of other characters.

ra

ft

co

py

::

In Porvorim, my own grandmother Julia Vaz e Pinto had five of us to entertain in this fashion, and since there was a wide disparity in our ages (my youngest sibling was seven years older than I was, and the oldest was twelve years older), the stories that amused my brother and sisters usually scared me out of my wits.

D

The tiger was always the villain; the jackal was less so, because he sometimes took the victim’s side against the wicked Vagh Mam. The female jackal, the koli, was the hardworking one,

Victor Rangel-Ribeiro whom her husband always tried to cheat, with only temporary success.

an

sl a

tio

n

Those stories were relevant for their times, the early years of the twentieth century, when tigers were known to prowl around the railway tracks in Mormugão and jackals – kolos as well as kolis – were familiar sights on all our hills and in our sugarcane fields.

tu

gu

es

e

tr

The tigers and jackals are gone forever, it seems, and the sugarcane fields as well, and gone too is the innocence and credulity of childhood; our young ones today, exposed as they are from an early age to the movies, radio, and television, demand more sophisticated stories, set in real life.

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Po r

Enter Anita Pinto. Her years of teaching in elementary classrooms has given her special insights into the minds of young children; so she writes stories that engage their imagination, in a style that is easy enough for them to read, yet includes words that challenge them to continually expand their vocabulary and increase their grasp of language. –Victor Rangel-Ribeiro

135

Anita Pinto

NITA

P INTO is a guest lecturer in Communications at

Po r

A

tu

gu

es

e

tr

an

sl a

tio

n

About the author

D

ra

ft

co

py

::

fo

r

Mapusa, in North Goa. She has been a senior copy writer for ad agencies in Mumbai (then Bombay), a freelance writer, a play-school owner, director of Le Grand Auto Garage Pvt Ltd, elocution trainer in Bombay and Goa, a voice development guide, and writer. She is alumna of Sophia College, Mumbai. Anita Pinto is also the author of Tales from Golden Goa, Elocution Pieces for Students (Book I and II) which sold over 15,000 copies, a book of poems on Christianity, and has co-authored a series of value education books which is to be published by Black Swan Orient Longmans.

136

Draftcopy ::forPortuguesetranslation -

15 The Buffalo and the Bird. 94. 17 What will People ..... animals and birds like us, and sometimes they are ...... and Dhruv were stars that sang “Twinkle, twinkle,”.

1MB Sizes 1 Downloads 38 Views

Recommend Documents

No documents