DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

9

Z Page 1 of 34

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY “By School Year 2021-2022, Division of Ozamiz City serves 33,429 learners for the formal and alternative delivery systems, where learners acquire the highest possible standards of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values described as Maka-Diyos, Makatao, Makalikasan at Makabansa.” To realize the above-stated development goal, this Division Education Development Plan (DEDP) for 2017 to 2022 is developed. The six-year plan is crafted based on the performance trends (historical data) of the Division in access, quality and governance indicators. The analyses of the historical data include segmentation, key staging and forecasting to guide the Education Supervisors, Public Schools District Supervisors, School Governance and Operations Division Personnel and School Heads in identifying specific improvement areas and relevant strategic interventions. The DEDP therefore, reflects the vision to achieve Excellence in general, along the key priorities and strategies in achieving universal participation in Basic Education, quality basic education for all school children, and efficient and effective governance. The VISION OF EXCELLENCE is possible because there are committed stakeholders of education who embrace it as their way of life. Their positive attitudes are the keys that make things happen.

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

2.0 RATIONALE/BACKGROUND 2.1 Introducing the Division Ozamiz City is the commercial hub in the Province of Misamis Occidental. Being the gateway of the province, its seaport is the 4th busiest seaport in the country with 3.1 million passengers. Its airport also boasts an increase of 19.17% of passenger making it one of the two airports in the country with increased passenger traffic. These provide job opportunities for the Ozamiznons and its neighboring municipalities and cities. Inflation rate in the City has risen up to 6.90%1 which makes purchasing of goods and availing of services more difficult. Business registration and renewal has been declining for the past years from 3,225 in FY 2012 to 1,976 in 2015 (Jan-Mar). The poor population in the City has reach 62,230 in 2016 according to the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD). With these pressing issues, the Division of Ozamiz City strives hard in hitting better performance through effective implementation, sustainable operations and maintenance of programs and projects. For the next six years, the Division of Ozamiz City envisions to achieve universal participation in basic education by strengthening schools’/CLCs’ capacity to bring in school-aged children in school, keep them in school, find those who dropped from school, promote G4 to G6

1

Competitiveness Council of the Philippines released yearly data on the economic dynamism, government efficiency and infrastructure.

Retrieved from http://www.competitive.org.ph/cmcindex/pages/profile/?lgu=Ozamiz

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

school-aged children as well as ALS A & E learners (secondary) and improve transition of students from G6 to G7. The Division also aims to achieve quality basic education for all school children by increasing the NAT MPS Y4 in all learning areas, both public and private schools. Being challenged by the 4786 none-school-aged learners and its overall mean percentage score in the National Achievement Test (NAT) results in Year 4 which is pegged at 56.67 % (Moving towards Mastery Level) in the latest assessment, the Division of Ozamiz City focuses on the following strategies: to decrease the Grade 4 to 6 dropout; to decrease repetition rate among the male Grade 7 to 10; to increase transition rate in the Grade 6 to 7 ; to increase completion rate in the ALS A & E Secondary program; and to increase the number of schools in the fourth Quadrant2 in NAT Grade 10. In the quest for providing a child-centered and high quality basic education, where students learn and develop their full potentials, the Division of Ozamiz City continuously innovates to improve its services. While the Division can laud on its achievements and accolades in the past years, these serve as motivating factors to double its efforts in transforming the school-aged children and out-of-school youth in Ozamiz City into functionally-literate and productive Ozamiznons – the contribution of the Division of Ozamiz in making the city a precious gem of the Panguil Bay.

2

Fourth quadrant is from MPS 76-100.

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

2.2 Division Performance on Access The Division has 44,492 school-aged children in 2016, but only 75.88% of these school-aged children are enrolled in Kindergarten to Senior High School (Grade 11). The remainder encompasses the out-ofschool youth, dropouts, leavers and ALS non-completers. Cited as the center of commerce in the Province of Misamis Occidental, school-aged population is unpredictable brought about by migration and the tendency of school-aged children to engage in menial works; hence, challenging the Division to bring the children in school at the right age, keep them in school and find children who dropped out and bring them back to school. In 2016, the Division was able to attract 4,449 non-school-aged children. As shown below, the emerging priority of this Division is to increase the Net Enrollment Rate (NER) of the Grade 4 to Grade 6. Gross Enrollment Rate

2012

2013 K to G3

G4-G6

, Page 5 of 34

2015 G7-G10

2016

81.3 67.10

72.99

81.8

82.62 81.29

60.59

59.90

2014

67.30

83.78

72.17

81.41 63.63

63.58

63.45

82.62

70.58

83.92 68.16

50.59

65.87

84.30

91.14

98.63

104.53

Net Enrollment Rate

84.59 68.09 65.14

67.83

81.61

Figure 1. GERNER

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Dropout is one of the existing perennial problems besetting the Division. The issue is most serious in G4 to G6 particularly among male pupils (Figure 2). Without doing anything to prevent this phenomenon, the cases will reach up to 4203 pupils by SY 2021-2022. For SY 2016-2017, the Division was able to enroll 91 Balik-Aral4 (Figure 2) for Grade 4 to Grade 6. The 91 learners were dropout of the past school year. For Grades 4 to 6 where dropout turnout is high, it was found out that only 75.00 % of the teachers sent letters to parents to follow up absences and tardiness of pupils; 60.00 % of the teachers conducted home visitation to pupils who were at risk of dropping out; and Reducing Dropout Program is not included in the School Improvement Plan. In the division level, Child Protection Policy is in place and operational as an outcome of the training conducted in the Division Level; however, it had no mechanism yet to track its dropouts.

315 57

Balik-Aral (2016)

224

245

34 180 Male

Female

Unenrolled

140 90

70 45

35

70

45

35

10

10

2012

2013

40 20

2014

Figure 2. G4 – G6 Dropouts

3 4

2015 Male

2016 Female

G4 - G6 Male Dropouts Forecast, Appendix B, p. 13 Balik-aral is defined as children who enrolled in the system after dropping out from the school.

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Total

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

School leavers cover pupils who finish a grade level but failed to enroll in the next grade level of the following school year. The Division of Ozamiz City has 466 male school leavers from the G7 to G10 (Figure 3). The problem will continue to exist by 2022 with 360 cases 5. The phenomenon is due to the prevalence of menial work such as peddling in the market; safeguarding cars outside business establishments, working as construction laborers and farming that lured pupils to stop schooling; and 20.00% of the parents of the school leavers had priority concern on uplifting the economic status of the family rather than education. The data imply that the Division needs to strengthen its childfinding program for Grade 4 to Grade 6 pupils and bring them back to school. A pupil who failed to perform within the standards will be retained in the same grade level. He or she will be considered a repeater should he or she attends school the next school year. The problem of repetition in

the

Division

of

Figure 3. School Leavers

Ozamiz City is serious in

940

G7 to G10 (Figure 4). 523

The

525

466

number

of

repeaters is highest in

326

SY 2016-2017 among male students (N = 2012 5

2013

2014

2015

2016

G7 - G10 Male School Leavers Forecast, Appendix C, p. 14

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

315). In 2022, it is expected that there will be 2076 male repeaters from Grade 7 to Grade 10 if the Division will not make interventions to address the problem. 404

385

Male 292

315

Female

296

Total

242

138 100

93 54

2012-2013

2013-2014

113 85

38

28

2014-2015

2015-2016

89

2016-2017

School Year Figure 4. G7 to G10 Repeaters

The local government unit of Ozamiz City, universities and colleges in the locality and NGOs such as World Vision and Rotary Club of Ozamiz North annually donated learning materials and school supplies especially to deprived and underserved school children. With the strong support of the external stakeholders, the Division of Ozamiz City is confident that it can address the foregoing problems on access. Transition in the Division of Ozamiz City in Grade 6 to Grade 7 is increasing from Calendar Year (CY) 2012 up to CY 2015 but it dramatically decreased from 113.00 % in CY 2015 to 95.00 % in CY 2016 (Figure 5). The sudden remarkable decrease is due to the prevalence of high dropout and the increased number of repeaters in Grade 6.

6

G7 - G10 Male Repeaters Forecast, Appendix D, p. 14

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

The transition in G10 to G11 reveals that out of 1652 Grade 10 completers during SY 2015-2016, only 1566 or 94.79 % are enrolled in Grade 11. This means that 9 out of 10 Grade 10 completers proceeded to senior high school. The phenomena that are contributory to the current transition rate are the following: there are only 14 secondary schools that can accommodate graduates from 49 elementary schools. In addition, ten elementary schools are more than three kilometers away from the nearest secondary school. Students from the 18 elementary schools need to spend more than Php 20.00 a day for fare going to and from the nearest secondary school. Majority (65.00%) of the Grade 7 classrooms either need major repair or are for condemnation7. However, the Division is positive that in the long run, school proximity and transportation problem among the students can be solved given that the local government unit of Ozamiz City is supportive of the application of conversion of elementary schools to integrated schools. More importantly, the LGU has increased its budget allocation and networks8 connecting barangays (from 180.17 km to 310.46 km in 2015).

CY 2016

95.00%

CY 2015

113.00%

CY 2014

101.00%

CY 2013

100.00%

CY 2012

84.00% Figure 5. G6 to G7 Transition

7

Retrieved from EBEIS National School Building Inventory (NSBI) As to road network, the National Competitiveness Council rated Ozamiz City with 0.2123 after improving unpaved roads to asphalt, gravel and concrete. Retrieved from http://www.competitive.org.ph/cmcindex/pages/profile/?lgu=Ozamiz. 8

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Learners’ enrolment vis-à-vis completers in the ALS both in A & E Elementary and A & E Secondary Programs is fluctuating (Fig. 6). The most pressing problem can be seen in the low completion rates among learners in the A & E Secondary. The completion rate is projected at a minimal rate of 43.64%9 by 2022 if no appropriate interventions will be employed. The low completion among the ALS A & E Secondary learners is heavily affected by the their tendency to look for better jobs outside the city rather than attending and completing the program. The learners also tend to transfer residence due to family problems; others enter into early marriage. The designation of a Division ALS Coordinator who oversees and leads in the implementation of ALS programs and the strong support of the barangay local government unit in conducting community mapping and providing learning centers, materials and honoraria to ALS session are a few indicators that the strategies crafted herein for keeping

Figure 6. ALS Enrollees vs. Completers

ENROLLED

1018

1444

A & E learners can be sustained.

225 117

691

1026

346 233

535

125 96

459

100 63

351 286

133 105

634

642

COMPLETED

A&E Elem. A&E Sec. A&E Elem. A&E Sec. A&E Elem. A&E Sec. A&E Elem. A&E Sec. A&E Elem. A&E Sec.

2012

9

2013

2014

ALS Enrolment vs. Completers Forecast, Appendix E, p. 15

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2015

2016

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

2.3 Division Performance on Quality The quality of teaching and learning in the Division is measured by performances in the Language Assessment for the Primary Grades (LAPG), National Achievement Test for Grade 6 and Grade 10, and the A & E performance of ALS takers. The performances of the Grade 3 pupils in LAPG is described as “Average” and “Moving Towards Mastery” levels (74.83). This shows that the Grade 3 pupils failed to reach the minimum standard of 75. The results further reveal that a number of schools have MPS belonging to Quadrants 1, 2 and 3 denoting that the schools do not reach the mastery level of 75.00 %. The data imply that there is a great need for the content experts (Education Program Supervisors) to revisit curricular delivery of each content area in the division. The NAT 6 MPS of the Division of Ozamiz City is described as “Moving Towards Mastery” in all subject areas. The trend of this overall NAT 6 MPS is increasing. The highest MPS (80.56) among the school years was in 2015. Filipino has the lowest(71.13)MPS in 2015. However, results of

NAT G10

reveal that a great number of

schools have MPS belonging to Quadrant 1, 2 and 3 in all learning areas denoting that they performed below the minimum standard 75.00 MPS. Without employing any intervention, the NAT G10 performance will only be at the passing MPS of 77.6910 by 2022.

10

NAT G10 MPS Forecast, Appendix F, p. 15

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

A study of the phenomenon reveals that only 80.00 % of the competencies of all learning areas in Grade 10 are covered during the SY 2014-2015; prevalence of non-majors and teachers with Education degree as their second course teaching the core learning areas such Mathematics; Science; Filipino; Araling Panlipunan; Education sa Pagpapakatao; English; Technology and Livelihood Education and Music, Arts, Physical Education and Health; 64.29 % of the teachers utilized Teaching Guide rather than Curriculum Guide without considering the sequence of the competencies to be mastered; and 78.57 % of the G10 teachers of the priority schools need training on identifying appropriate instructional strategies to address the learners’ learning styles. The following practices of the Division are seen as good support to attain the desired NAT MPS: Curriculum Guides, Teaching Guides and Learning Materials are downloadable in the Division Learning Resources portal; reproduction of LMs in the Division and School levels are now possible through the use of MOOE as fiscal resource; parents and LGU of Ozamiz City are supportive in the conduct of NAT interventions and enrichment. Table 1. Performance in NAT Year 4 Subject Areas Filipino Araling Panlipunan Mathematics Science English Critical Thinking

2011 38.00 52.91 40.72 53.66 40.98 47.22

2012 49.42 54.25 49.59 41.01 53.79 51.16

2013 56.25 60.53 52.43 47.00 56.18 48.49

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2014 55.09 63.11 55.09 49.57 58.14 55.17

2015 59.47 51.99 60.86 57.34 54.88 55.17

Q1 0 0 0 0 0 0

2015 Q2 Q3 26 1 12 15 9 11 10 17 8 18 10 16

Q4 0 0 7 0 1 1

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Overall

45.25

49.21

53.93

54.92

56.67

Notes: Q1 - 0-24.99; Q2 - 25.00 - 49.99; Q3 - 50.00 - 74.99; Q4 - 75.00 - 100.00 Mastery/Achievement Level: 96 - 100 – Mastered; 86 - 95 – Closely Approximating Mastery; 66 – 85 – Moving Towards Mastery; 35 - 65 – Average; 15 - 34 – Low; 5 - 14 – Very Low; and 0 - 4 – Absolutely No Mastery.

2.4 Inclusion To prove that the Division of Ozamiz City practices inclusive education, efforts are geared towards extending educational services to learners who cannot cope with the standards of formal education and alternative learning system, specifically, learners with special needs, IP learners and inmates. Two elementary schools in the Division cater learners with special needs: Maningcol Central School and Ozamiz City Central School SPED Center. The increasing enrolment figure of SPED indicates that parents in the Division of Ozamiz City are fully aware of sending their children with special needs to school. Another indicator of inclusive education is enrolment of IP learners in the formal education. In both elementary and secondary levels, enrolment increased drastically for the last five school years. The enrolment figures are pegged at 249411 for elementary level and 2484 for secondary level in the school year 2016-2017. The Division also caters the educational needs of the inmates in Ozamiz City jail. A total of 127 inmates have completed the ALS programs (BLP, A & E Elementary and A & E Secondary) from CY 2013 to CY 2016.

11

Data downloaded from www.ebeis.deped.gov.ph

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

3.0 Strategic Directions 3.1 Strategic Goals The table below presents the goals, strategies and interventions that the Division has developed after assessing and analyzing its performance for the past five years using SWOT analyses. These will be implemented to improve the Divisions practices and achieve universal participation and quality basic education by 2022. Table 2. Strategic Goals, Strategies and Interventions Goals Achieve universal participation in Basic Education

Achieve quality basic education for all school children

Strategies Strengthen schools/CLCs and community leaders capacity in bringing school-aged children in school, keep them in school, find those who dropped from school and promote G4 to G6 schoolaged children as well as ALS A & E learners (secondary). Increase the number of public and private elementary and high schools belonging to the 4th Quadrant group (75-100).

Achieve Strengthen support efficient and arrangement and effective delivery to schools. governance

Interventions  Capacitate schools/CLCs and community leaders in bringing school-aged children to school, keep them in school, find those who drop out from school and promote G4 to G6 school-aged children as well as ALS A & E learners (secondary).  Assist in adjusting the Enhanced School Improvement Plan (ESIP) of Nine (9) identified schools to include Programs on reducing dropout.

 Convert nine (9) elementary schools to integrated schools.  Intensify instructional supervision in schools to check alignment of objectives, activities and assessment with the curriculum guide.  Conduct enhancement training on teaching strategies for non-major, non-education graduates, and newly –hired teachers.  Create donor community in schools through establishing collaboration among Local Government Unit, NonGovernment Organizations, Private Sectors and Alumni to act on emerging priorities on Access and Quality.

 Formulate and implement Division Research Agenda based on the division priority improvement areas for the next six years. Page 14 of 34

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Goals

Strategies

Interventions  Conduct enhancement trainings to

capacitate division personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance.  Conduct year-end performance evaluation to division personnel.

4.0 Key Performance Indicators In the Division’s quest of achieving universal participation in basic education, it aims to decrease dropout to 60 pupils; decrease G4 to G6 school leavers to 26 pupils; decrease repetition cases to 83; increase transition rate to 95.00 %; and increase completion rate among ALS A & E Secondary learners to 97.00 %. In achieving quality basic education for all school children, the Division targets a NAT G10 MPS of 97.00 % in all learning areas. The table below

details the targeted annual

performance. The targeted improvement is scheduled in Table 3. Table 3. Projected Performance Indicators Baseline

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

60.59%

66.66%

72.73%

78.80%

84.87%

90.94%

97.01 %

315

264

213

162

111

60

9

466

392

319

245

172

99

26

431

361

292

222

152

83

13

95%

95.33%

95.66%

95.99%

96.32%

96.65 %

97%

67.88%

72.73 %

77.58%

82.83%

87.28%

92.13 %

97%

NAT 10 MPS (All Learning Areas)

56.67

63.39

70.11

76.83

83.55

90.27

97.00

SBM Level III (High Schools)

0

2

4

7

9

11

13

Goal Achieve Universal Participation in Basic Education

KPI NER Dropout (G4 - G6)

School Leaver (G7 - G10)

Repetition (G7 – G10)

Transition (G6-G7; G10G11)

ALS Completion (A & E Secondary) Achieve quality basic education for all school children Achieve efficient and

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

effective governance

5.0 Organizational Capacity and Arrangements With this six-year strategic plan, the Division of Ozamiz City will track and monitor the efficiency and effectiveness with framework geared toward better results composed of the following three key measures: A. Division Outcome which will be measured through National Achievement Test (NAT), Net Enrollment Rate (NER) and its subindicators; B. Operational Effectiveness which is assessed from the Budget Execution Document (annual physical and financial plan) through quarterly reporting, Budget Accountability Report (quarterly physical and financial accomplishment); and C. Organizational Effectiveness which revolves around the following basic elements: agency mandate that is aligned to the organizational priorities; a system that is outcomes-based, functional division approach to performance management, forms and tools that are user-friendly and show alignment of individual and organizational goals (performance commitment review form), information systems that support monitoring and evaluation, and an internal plan (Table 4).

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DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Table 4. Organizational Capacity and Arrangements Plan What are the interventions to achieve the strategies?

What can the Division implementers do to operationalize interventions?

 Capacitate  Conduct intensive schools/CLCs community and community mapping of leaders in school-aged bringing schoolchildren and ALS age children in A & E learners school, keep (Secondary) in them in school, the City find those who drop from  Develop unified school and software in promote G4 to tracking schoolG6 school-aged aged children children as well and ALS A & E as ALS A & E learners learners (Secondary) (secondary).  Orientation on the use of software and reporting of its results

What are the competencies of the Division implementers?

What are the resources needed for the interventions?

 Written and Communication Skills

Human: ITO III, Planning Officer

 ICT Skills  Creativity and Innovation Skills

Material: Internet Connectivity, Laptop

 Oral Communication Skills,

Fiscal: MOOE, Donations; Capital Outlay

 TA Skills

 Provide technical assistance for big schools on the utilization of software  Assist schools in School Governing Council (SGC)revitalization and issue copies of roles, duties and responsibilities of School Governing Council Officers and members.  Intensify monitoring and evaluation of the newly implemented unified software. Page 17 of 34

Who can help the Division implementers?

Barangay Council, MU - College of Computer Studies, MU - College of Education, LSU - College of Teacher Education, Rotary Club of Ozamiz North, Faith Hospital, MU Medical Center. Crown Paper and Stationer, Gloria Bazar, Kristan Educational Supplies, Gaisano, Geege Mall, CSWD, City Health Office, Globe, Smart, Jollibee Metro Ozamiz Water District, Bryant Marketing, FilipinoChinese Chamber of Commerce, Misamis Occidental Electric Cooperative, Inc., Hebron, McDonalds Ozamiz, PhilAm Life Insurance.

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

What are the interventions to achieve the strategies?

 Assist in adjusting the Enhanced School Improvement Plan (ESIP) of Nine (9) identified schools to programs on dropout reduction

 Convert eight (8) elementary schools to integrated schools.

What can the Division implementers do to operationalize interventions?

What are the competencies of the Division implementers?

 Re-orient school  Planning Skills heads on crafting ESIP inclusive of  ICT Skills Programs on dropout  Technical reduction. Assistance Skills

What are the resources needed for the interventions?

Who can help the Division implementers?

Human: SGOD Chief Education Supervisor

School Governing Council ParentTeacher Association Barangay Council

Material: Sample SIP with DORP Fiscal: MOOE

 Provide technical assistance on conducting feasibility study

 Planning Skills  Analytical Skills

 Consolidate necessary requirements for the establishment of IS  Request LGU to craft resolution on the conversion of elementary schools to integrated schools  Recommend the proposed conversion of schools to the regional office  If approved, include the integrated schools in the education information systems

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Human: Division Engineer, Planning Officer, Budget Officer, Administrative Officer, Supply Officer; HR

Jollibee Metro Ozamiz Water District Bank of the Philippine Islands Banco de Oro Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas United Coconut Planters Bank Land Bank of the Philippines Development Bank of the Philippines China Bank Metrobank Ozamiz Security Bank Eastwest Bank School Governing Council PTA Barangay Community Regional Office

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

What are the interventions to achieve the strategies?

What can the Division implementers do to operationalize interventions?

What are the competencies of the Division implementers?

 Intensify instructional supervision in junior high schools to check alignment of objectives, activities and assessment to the curriculum guide

 Craft monthly Instructional Supervisory Plan and schedules based from ITTPR

 Written communication skills

 Conduct enhancement training on teaching strategies for non-major and non-education graduates.

 Conduct training needs and profile survey among non-major and non-education graduates

 Collaboration Skill

 Prepare monthly accomplishment report

 Planning Skill  Research Skill  Facilitating Skill

 Prepare training design and matrices

What are the resources needed for the interventions?

Who can help the Division implementers?

Material: Laptop

Regional Office: QUAD FTAD

Human: Chief CID EPS PSDS

Human: Chief CID Curriculum Implementation Division, Planning and Research Unit Fiscal: MOOE

La Salle University – College of Teacher Education Misamis University – College of Education

 Submit of training completion report  Create donor community through establishing collaboration among Local Government Unit, NonGovernment Organizations, Private Sectors and Alumni

 Participate in the planning among core business group on how the division can maximize its strengths, share available resources and develop initiatives.

 Research Skills  Innovation Skills  Problem Solving Skills  Social Mobilization Skills

 Conduct Stakeholder's forum and commitment/ MOA/MOU signing  Mobilize resources to prioritized schools

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Human: Chief SGOD SEPS/EPS II – Social Mobilization and Networking Material: MOA and MOU

Lions Club Ozamiz Lions Club International Philippine National Police La Salle University – College of Arts and Sciences La Salle University – College of Arts and Sciences School Governing Council ParentTeacher Association

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

What are the interventions to achieve the strategies?

 Formulate and implement Division Research Agenda based on the division priority improvement areas for the next six years

What can the Division implementers do to operationalize interventions?  Identify the Initial Findings

 Identify priority improvement areas and strategies of the division for the next three (3) years

What are the competencies of the Division implementers?

What are the resources needed for the interventions?

Who can help the Division implementers?

Barangay Council

 Planning Skills  Research Skills

Chief CID Chief SGOD SEPS-Planning and Research

LGU, HEIs

 Clinical Coaching Skills

 Formulate the Division Research Agenda

 Disseminate the Division Research Agenda thru Division Memorandum, Division Website, and ManCom  Conduct  Create a enhancement committee and trainings to assign capacitate chairperson and division members personnel  Formulate a and school training matrix heads on and project efficient and proposal effective  Conduct training governance on Financial Literacy  Conduct a Program Implementation Review  Conduct year-  Create a end committee and performance assign evaluation for chairperson and division office members personnel.  Formulate a training matrix and project proposal  Conduct a Program Implementation Review

 Planning Skill  Research Skill

Chief CID Chief SGOD SEPS-Planning and Research SEPS-HRTD SEPS-M & E

LGU, HEIs

Facilitating Skill Evaluation Skill

 Planning Skill  Research Skill  Facilitating Skill  Evaluation Skill

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Chief CID Chief SGOD SEPS-Planning and Research SEPS-HRTD SEPS-M & E

LGU, HEIs

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

6.0 Indicative Timeline The implementation of the planned strategies and interventions is scheduled from 2017 to 2022 in Table 5. The schedule serves as guide in the formulation of medium-term development plans and annual operational plans.

Table 5. Indicative Timeline of the Strategies and Interventions Strategies/Interventions Strengthen schools’/CLCs’ and community leaders capacity to bring in school-aged children to school, keep them in school, find those who drop out from school and promote G4 to G6 school-aged children as well as ALS A & E learners (secondary).  Capacitate schools/CLCs and community leaders in bringing school-age children in school, keep them in school, find those who drop from school and promote G4 to G6 school-aged children as well as ALS A & E learners (secondary).  Assist in adjusting the Enhanced School Improvement Plan (ESIP) of Nine (9) identified schools to include Dropout Reduction Program.  Convert eight (8) elementary schools to integrated schools. Increase the number of public and private elementary and high schools belonging to the 4th Quadrant group (75-100).  Intensify instructional supervision in junior high schools to check alignment of objectives, activities and assessment to the curriculum guide.  Conduct enhancement training on teaching strategies for non-major and non-education graduates and newly-hired teachers. Achieve efficient and effective governance  Create donor community through establishing collaboration among Local Government Unit, NonGovernment Organizations, Private Sectors and Alumni.  Formulate and implement Division Research Agenda based on the division priority improvement areas for the next six years  Conduct enhancement trainings to capacitate division personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance.  Conduct year-end performance evaluation for division personnel.

Page 21 of 34

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

7.0 Appendices Appendix A. NER-GER Variance Forecast

NER-GER Variance Forecast 9000 8000

7672

7704

7457

7540

7000 5782

6000

6048 5653 5259 4865 4470

5000

4076 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Appendix B. G4-G6 Male Dropouts Forecast G 4 - G6 Male Droupouts Forecast 600 525 473

500 420 368

400 315 300

245

200

263

140 70

100 35

35

2012

2013

0 2014

2015

2016

2017

Page 22 of 34

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Appendix C. G7-G10 Male School Leavers Forecast G7-G10 Male School Leavers Forecast 1000

940

900 800 700 600

523

525

466

500 400

360

326

300

246

213

200

131

98 100

17

0

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Appendix D. G7 - G10 Repeaters Forecast G7-G10 Male Repeaters Forecast 350 315 300

292

242

250

207

207

207

207

207

207

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

200

150 100 85

100

50

0 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Page 23 of 34

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Appendix E. ALS Enrolment vs. Completers Forecast

ALS Enrolment vs. Completers Forecast 2500

2019 2000

1852 1701

1685 1518

1444

1500

1352 1185 1026

1563

1018

1426 1288

1150

1013

1000 634 500

459

691

642 535

351 286

346 233

133 105

100 63

125 96

2012

2013

2014

294

363

271

340

248 120

317

225 117

123

126

129

132

135

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

0 2015

A & E Elem. Enrolment

A & E Elem. Completers

A & E Sec. Enrolment

A & E Sec. Competers

Appendix F. NAT G10 MPS Forecast NAT G10 MPS Forecast 90.00 80.00 70.00 60.56 60.00

53.93

54.92

2013

2014

63.42

66.27

69.13

71.98

74.84

77.69

56.67

49.21 50.00

45.25

40.00 30.00 20.00 10.00 0.00 2011

2012

2015

2016

2017

Page 24 of 34

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Appendix G. List of Priority Schools for Male G4 - G6 Dropouts Schools 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

f

Felipe Carreon MS Ozamiz City CS Pulot ES Andrea D. Costonera ES (Aguada ES) Dona Consuelo ES Malaubang Integrated School Bongbong ES Dimaluna ES Sancho Capa ES Embargo ES Labo CS Gango ES Maningcol CS Misamis Annex IS Balintawak ES Baybay ES Juan A. Acapulco ES Labinay ES Maximino S. Laurete, Sr. ES Ozamiz City CS - SPED Center San Antonio ES

14 11 8 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 85

Cumulative f 14 25 33 40 46 52 57 62 66 69 72 74 76 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85

Cumulative % 16.47 29.41 38.82 47.06 54.12 61.18 67.06 72.94 77.65 81.18 84.71 87.06 89.41 91.76 92.94 94.12 95.29 96.47 97.65 98.82 100.00

Appendix H. List of Priority Schools for G7- G10 Male Repeaters

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Schools

f

Ozamiz City National High School Ozamiz City School of Arts and Trades Labo National High School Tabid National High School Montol National High School Pulot National High School Calabayan National High School Malaubang Integrated School Misamis Annex Integrated School San Antonio National High School Cogon Integrated School Labinay National High School Gala National High School Kinuman Norte National High School

75 52 38 26 22 22 21 16 14 14 5 5 3 2 315

Page 25 of 34

Cumulative f 75 127 165 191 213 235 256 272 286 300 305 310 313 315

Cumulative % 23.81 40.32 52.38 60.63 67.62 74.60 81.27 86.35 90.79 95.24 96.83 98.41 99.37 100.00

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Appendix I. School Leavers of G4-G6 school leavers (male and female)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Schools Ozamiz City Central School Baybay Central School Domingo A. Barloa Elementary School Malaubang Integrated School Faustino Decena Elementary School Maximino S. Laurete Sr. Elementary School Catadman Elementary School Bacolod Elementary School Maningcol Central School Cogon Integrated School Felipe Carreon Memorial School Pershing Tan Queto Sr. Elementary School Embargo Elementary School Ozamiz City SPED Center Sangay Elementary School Sinusa Elementary School Dimaluna Elementary School Gregorio A. Saquin Elementary School

Page 26 of 34

f 38 11 10 10 9 9

Cum f 38 49 59 69 78 87

Cum % 21.23% 27.37% 32.96% 38.55% 43.58% 48.60%

8 6 6 5 5 5

95 101 107 112 117 122

53.07% 56.42% 59.78% 62.57% 65.36% 68.16%

4 4 4 4 3 3

126 130 134 138 141 144

70.39% 72.63% 74.86% 77.09% 78.77% 80.45%

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017-2022

Prepared by: ROSALYN M. LATO SEPS-Sch. M M & E

JOEL T. ACLAO SEPS-Planning & Research

SUSAN EPIFANIA B. CARPIO Chief ES, SGOD

ELL JUNE S. ABUCAY Planning Officer III

ANACLETA A. GACASAN Chief ES, CID

REBONFAMIL R. BAGUIO Schools Division Superintendent

Page 27 of 34

MEDIUM TERM PLAN 2017-2019 Division of Ozamiz City

Appendix J. Medium Term Plan Goal 1: Achieve universal participation in Basic Education STRATEGIES

Strategy 1: Strengthen schools’ /CLCs' capacity to find, keep and promote G4 to G6 school-aged children in school and ALS A & E Secondary Learners. Strategy 1: Strengthen schools’ /CLCs' capacity to find, keep and promote G4 to G6 school-aged children in school and ALS A & E Secondary Learners.

INTERVENTIONS

1.1 Capacitate schools/CLCs and community leaders in finding, keeping and promoting G4 to G6 school-aged children in schools as well as ALS A & E learners (Secondary).

1.2. Assist in adjusting the Enhanced School Improvement Plan (ESIP) of Nine (9) identified schools to include Dropout Reduction Program (DORP)

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS

1.1.1. Regular Enrolment Program

1.2.1. Enhanced Dropout Reduction Program

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

PERSON/S RESPONSIBLE

COST

SOURCE OF FUNDS

SBM Coordinator SBM Coordinating Team HRTD

HRTD FUNDS

Chief ESs, (CID & SGOD); SEPSPlanning & Research; Planning Officer; M&E Team; HRTD

HRTD FUNDS

28 | P a g e

MEDIUM TERM PLAN 2017-2019 Division of Ozamiz City

STRATEGIES

INTERVENTIONS

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

PERSON/S RESPONSIBLE

COST

SOURCE OF FUNDS

Strategy 1: 1.3. Convert nine 1.3.1. Transition Strengthen (9) Elementary Program schools’ Schools to /CLCs' Integrated Schools capacity to find, keep and promote G4 to G6 school-aged children in school and ALS A & E Secondary Learners. Goal 2: Achieve quality basic education for all school children.

Chief ESs, (CID & SGOD); SEPSPlanning & Research; Planning Officer; M&E Team; HRTD

HRTD FUNDS

Strategy 2: Increase the number of public and private elementary and high schools belonging to the 4th Quadrant group (75100).

Chief ESs, CID EPS; PSDS M&E Team; HRTD

HRTD FUNDS

2.1. Intensify instructional supervision in schools to check alignment of objectives, activities and assessment with the curriculum guide.

2.1.1. Instructional Supervision

29 | P a g e

MEDIUM TERM PLAN 2017-2019 Division of Ozamiz City

STRATEGIES

Strategy 2: Increase the number of public and private elementary and high schools belonging to the 4th Quadrant group (75100). Strategy 2: Increase the number of public and private elementary and high schools belonging to the 4th Quadrant group (75100). Strategy 2: Increase the number of public and private elementary

INTERVENTIONS

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

PERSON/S RESPONSIBLE

COST

SOURCE OF FUNDS

2.2. Conduct enhancement training in teaching strategies for nonmajor, noneducation graduates and newly-hired teachers.

2.2.1. Teacher Induction Program (TIP)

Chief ESs, CID EPS; PSDS M&E Team; HRTD

155,000.00 (MAY 75,000.00 & JUNE 80,000.00)

HRTD FUNDS

2.2. Conduct enhancement training in teaching strategies for nonmajor, noneducation graduates and newly-hired teachers.

2.2.2. Instructional Training Program (Training of Teachers on Values Education)

Chief ESs, CID EPS; PSDS M&E Team; HRTD

75,000.00

HRTD FUNDS

2.2. Conduct enhancement training in teaching strategies for nonmajor, non-

2.2.3. Instructional Training Program (Training of Master Teachers and Newly Promoted School

Chief ES – CID; EPSs PSDSs M & E Team HRTD

75,000.00

HRTD FUNDS

30 | P a g e

MEDIUM TERM PLAN 2017-2019 Division of Ozamiz City

STRATEGIES

INTERVENTIONS

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS

and high education Heads on schools graduates and Instructional belonging to newly-hired Supervision) the 4th teachers. Quadrant group (75100). Strategy 2: 2.2. Conduct 2.2.4. Instructional Increase the enhancement Training Program number of training in (Training of public and teaching Teachers on private strategies for nonMusic Strategies) elementary major, nonand high education schools graduates and belonging to newly-hired the 4th teachers. Quadrant group (75100). Goal 3: Achieve efficient and effective governance. Strategy 3: Strengthen support arrangement and delivery to schools.

3.1. Create donor community through establishing collaboration among Local Government Unit, Non-Government Organizations,

3.1.1. Schoolbased Management Program (SBM)

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

PERSON/S RESPONSIBLE

Chief ES – CID; EPSs PSDSs M & E Team HRTD

Chief ES – CID; EPSs PSDSs SBM COORDINATOR M & E Team HRTD

COST

SOURCE OF FUNDS

75,000.00

HRTD FUNDS

HRTD FUNDS

31 | P a g e

MEDIUM TERM PLAN 2017-2019 Division of Ozamiz City

STRATEGIES

Strategy 3: Strengthen support arrangement and delivery to schools.

Strategy 3: Strengthen

INTERVENTIONS

Private Sectors and Alumni. 3.2. Formulate and implement Division Research Agenda based on the division priority improvement areas for the next six years 3.3. Conduct enhancement trainings to capacitate division personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance. 3.3. Conduct enhancement trainings to capacitate division personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance. 3.3. Conduct enhancement

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

PERSON/S RESPONSIBLE

COST

SOURCE OF FUNDS

3.2.1. Action Research Program

SEPS – Planning & Research

HRTD FUNDS

3.3.1. Fiscal Management Program

Chief ES – CID; EPSs PSDSs M & E Team HRTD

64,320.00

HRTD FUNDS

3.3.2. Wellness Advocacy Program (School Heads)

Chief ES – CID; EPSs PSDSs M & E Team HRTD

73,645.00

HRTD FUNDS

Chief ES – CID;

298,936.04

HRTD FUNDS 32 | P a g e

MEDIUM TERM PLAN 2017-2019 Division of Ozamiz City

STRATEGIES

support arrangement and delivery to schools.

INTERVENTIONS

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

PERSON/S RESPONSIBLE

trainings to capacitate division personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance. 3.3. Conduct enhancement trainings to capacitate division personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance.

3.3.4. Wellness Advocacy Program (Division Office Personnel)

EPSs PSDSs M & E Team HRTD

3.3.5. Quarterly DMEA

3.3. Conduct enhancement trainings to capacitate division personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance.

3.3.6. Annual Implementation Review (AIR) Program

3.3. Conduct enhancement trainings to capacitate division

3.3.7. Induction Program for NonTeaching Personnel

SDS Chief ESs – (CID & SGOD); EPSs;PSDSs; M & E Team; Planning Officer; SEPSPlanning and Research HRTD SDS Chief ESs – (CID & SGOD); EPSs;PSDSs; M & E Team; Planning Officer; SEPSPlanning and Research HRTD Chief SGOD; AO V; HRTD

COST

SOURCE OF FUNDS

HRTD FUNDS

HRTD FUNDS

132,000.00

HRTD FUNDS

33 | P a g e

MEDIUM TERM PLAN 2017-2019 Division of Ozamiz City

STRATEGIES

INTERVENTIONS

/3personnel and school heads on efficient and effective governance. 3.4. Conduct yearend performance evaluation for Division Personnel.

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

3.4.1. Performance Evaluation Program

PERSON/S RESPONSIBLE

COST

SOURCE OF FUNDS

SDS; Chief ES,CID; Chief ES, SGOD; M&E Team; HRTD

51, 303.00

HRTD FUNDS

Prepared by:

ROSALYN M. LATO SEPS-Sch. Management M&E

JOEL T. ACLAO SEPS-Planning & Research

Recommending approval: SUSAN EPIFANIA B. CARPIO Chief ES, SGOD

ELL JUNE S. ABUCAY Planning Officer III

IVY J. CABUAL Division Budget Officer

MARICEL D. AVILA Division Accountant III

Approved: ANACLETA A. GACASAN Chief ES, CID

REBONFAMIL R. BAGUIO Schools Division Superintendent

34 | P a g e

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