A Collaboration with The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Institute in American History and Content Area Literacy “[A] knowledge of books is the basis upon which other knowledge is to be built . . .” George Washington 1771 in referring to plans for the education of his ward, young “Jacky” Custis

This July, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project hosted their second annual Institute in American History and Content Area Literacy. This weeklong institute was designed for history teachers with experience leading reading and writing workshops and a keen interest in developing a literacy-rich history curriculum. Participants traveled to Williamsburg, VA to study early American history “on location,” while working together to explore ways to intersect best literacy practices and history instruction.

Learning from George Wythe, Thomas Jefferson’s revered teacher Participants had the unique opportunity to interact with historical sites such as the landing site of the Jamestown settlers and trade shops in Williamsburg. They drew on these sites as primary sources and also heard from historical interpreters to gain a deeper understanding of American history.

Clothing teaches us about social class and trade in the colonies Emily Butler Smith, a lead staff developer at the TCRWP, helped participants draw on the latest methods in reading, note-taking, and writing narrative, information and argument texts to develop new ways to fold together instruction in literacy and history. Across the seven days, participants exchanged ideas with Colonial Williamsburg historians and took part in reenactments of key events in American history, such as a mock debate in the Virginia House of Burgesses with the question, “Should the Virginia colony remain loyal to Great Britain?”

John Greenhow, Williamsburg merchant, after a minilecture on the economic system Teachers participated in various elements of literacy instruction including reading and writing workshop minilessons, read aloud, strategy lessons, nonfiction research clubs, and historical fiction book clubs.

Participants taking notes while exploring the Jamestown archaeology site Another literacy connection came with the use of the historical fiction novel Blood on the River by Elisa Carbone, which explores the development of Jamestown through the eyes of John Smith’s servant, Samuel Collier. Reading this text to prepare for the institute gave participants a context for a trip to the Jamestown site, and provided rich book club conversations around comparing and contrasting historical information from the site with information from the novel.

Interpretation of a primary source from the Boston Massacre

This year, participants and Colonial Williamsburg staff piloted technology to enhance the learning and sharing of information, using the Voxer App to share photos, video and text as they explored historic sites and participated in activities. Through a closed group in the App, participants were able to easily connect with one another, document their interactions with different sites and interpreters, and share their learning throughout the week.

Sharing research during Trades shop exploration via Voxer

“The summer institute in Colonial Williamsburg has given me a rich understanding of history and content area literacy. Visiting historical locations and collaborating with other educators has been transformative, and I am excited to bring everything back to my classroom in the fall!” –Jasmine Junsay, 4th grade teacher, PS 29 Brooklyn. Participants left the institute feeling more confident in their knowledge of American History and their ability to integrate literacy skills with the content areas, and eager to bring history to life for their students. Applications for next summer’s Institute in American History and Content Area Literacy will be available later this year. Please check back for more information soon.

COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG FOUNDATION-TCRWP website 2015.pdf ...

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