Boyle Heights New Community Plan Draft Goals & Policies RESIDENTIAL GOALS AND POLICIES ....................................................................................................... 2 OVERARCHING RESIDENTIAL GOALS AND POLICIES............................................................................2 SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS ...................................................................................5 MULTIPLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS ...............................................................................5 COMMERCIAL GOALS AND POLICIES ................................................................................................... 8 OVERARCHING COMMERCIAL GOALS AND POLICIES .......................................................................8 NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICTS ................................................................................................................. 12 COMMUNITY CENTERS .......................................................................................................................... 13 TRANSIT-ORIENTED DISTRICTS AND MIXED-USE BOULEVARDS ........................................................... 14 REGIONAL CENTER COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS .................................................................................... 14 INDUSTRIAL CENTERS ............................................................................................................................ 16 HYBRID INDUSTRIAL CORRIDORS.......................................................................................................... 17 ART, HISTORY, AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION.................................................................................... 19 SPECIAL DISTRICTS ................................................................................................................................ 21 MOBILITY ............................................................................................................................................... 22 OVERARCHING GOALS AND POLICIES............................................................................................... 22 WALKING ................................................................................................................................................ 23 BICYCLING.............................................................................................................................................. 23 PUBLIC TRANSIT ...................................................................................................................................... 24 MOTORIZED VEHICLES ........................................................................................................................... 25 GOODS MOVEMENT ............................................................................................................................. 26 PARKING MANAGEMENT ...................................................................................................................... 27 PARKS, OPEN SPACE AND THE URBAN FOREST .................................................................................... 28 PARKS ...................................................................................................................................................... 28 OPEN SPACE .......................................................................................................................................... 29 STREETSCAPE AND URBAN FOREST ...................................................................................................... 29

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RESIDENTIAL GOALS AND POLICIES OVERARCHING RESIDENTIAL GOALS AND POLICIES Goal LU1.

Goal LU2.

Complete, livable and quality neighborhoods that provide a variety of housing types, densities, forms and design, and a mix of uses and services. Policy 1

Adequate housing and services. Provide housing that accommodates households of all sizes, as well as integrates safe and convenient access to schools, parks, and other amenities and services.

Policy 2

Neighborhood Transitions. Assure smooth transitions in scale, form, and character by regulating the setback, step backs, rear elevations, and backyard landscaping of new development where neighborhoods of differing housing type and density abut one another.

Policy 3

Housing for Families. Promote construction of residential units with three or more bedrooms which are suitable for larger families.

Policy 4

Promote Safe Environments. Ensure that residential neighborhoods are maintained to be walkable, safe, and inviting.

Policy 5

Analyze Impacts. Consider factors such as neighborhood character, identity, compatibility of land uses, and impacts on livability, air quality, services and public facilities, and traffic levels when changes in residential densities are proposed.

Policy 6

Community Engagement. Encourage sponsors of new developments to initiate early and communicate with community residents frequently.

Residential neighborhoods that enhance the pedestrian experience and preserve the Boyle Heights’ community atmosphere and artistic aesthetics. Policy 1

Neighborhood character. Maintain the distinguishing characteristics of Boyle Height's residential neighborhoods with respect to lot size, topography, housing scale and landscaping, to protect the character of existing neighborhoods from new, out-of-scale development.

Policy 2

Architectural Compatibility. Seek a high degree of architectural compatibility and landscaping for new infill development as well as additions to existing structures in order to protect the character and scale of existing residential neighborhoods.

Policy 3

Historic Integration. Encourage the design of new buildings that respect and complement the character of adjacent historic resources.

Policy 4

Compliance with Design Guidelines. Design multi-family residential projects to achieve a high level of quality and to be designed in accordance with the Citywide Design Standards and Guidelines.

Policy 5

Front yard character. Create a buffer between private and public spaces by encouraging landscaping between residential structures and the public right of way.

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Goal LU3.

Environmentally sustainable residential development that uses “green” design to minimize consumption of non-renewable natural resources and to replenish the City’s watershed by capturing groundwater, while preventing runoff and flooding. Policy 1

"Green" Design. Design new buildings to respond to the climate of Boyle Heights through their orientation, massing, and construction. Consider using passive solar design strategies, such as overhangs and shade trees, orienting building volumes, windows, and second-stories to maximize solar access, constructing wellinsulated wall systems, and providing usable covered outdoor areas to generate more comfortable and energy-efficient buildings.

Policy 2

Permeable Surfaces. Increase areas of permeability in conjunction with the design of any new project by utilizing permeable surfaces on driveways, walkways, and outdoor spaces in order to capture, infiltrate, and store water on site.

Policy 3

Healthy Homes. Promote “green” and safe building practices that support healthy homes (e.g. materials with low-VOC emissions).

Policy 4

Encourage LEED Standards. Encourage projects to include Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Standards.

Policy 5

Green Building Practices. Promote green building practices that support "healthy homes," particularly in addressing Air Quality and exposure to toxic/hazardous materials.

Policy 6

Toxic Hotspots. Require strict application of environmental requirements and restrictions for maintenance, use, development, and redevelopment adjacent and within Toxic Hotspots.

Policy 7

Community Garden Open Space. Encourage architects and developers to utilize community gardens as a portion of their open space requirements. If feasible, grey-water techniques and rain water runoff could be used to irrigate community gardens.

Policy 8

"Edible Landscaping". Encourage creation of edible front yards, edible parkways and sidewalks in areas identified by the community.

Policy 9

Drought Tolerant Landscaping. Encourage tenants, homeowners, and the development community to envision and incorporate designed landscapes projects that include native and drought tolerant species as appropriate to the neighborhood context.

Policy 10

Restrict Freeway Adjacent Development. Restrict development of housing adjacent to freeways and freeway ramps. Any development or redevelopment project shall include the highest standards to protect residents from exposure to poor air quality and other harmful particulates.

Policy 11

Drought-Tolerant and Bio-Diverse Green Roofs. Encourage the creation of green roofs to reduce heat gain, provide building insulation, absorb harmful pollution particulates, encourage storm-water retention, and promote habitat bio-diversity. Plants should be drought-tolerant, native to Southern California, and require little irrigation.

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Goal LU4.

Goal LU5.

Goal LU6.

Residential neighborhoods that provide access to homeownership and adequate housing for all persons regardless of income, age, gender, sexual-orientation, citizenship status, cultural, racial or ethnic identity. Policy 1

Individual Choice. Promote greater individual choice in type, quality, price and location of housing to provide ‘stepping-stones’ for homeownership.

Policy 2

Increase Homeownership. New infill developments should promote programs and loans that will help local residents qualify for purchase.

Policy 3

Minimize Displacement. Minimize the loss of good quality, affordable housing and encourage the replacement of demolished housing stock with new affordable housing opportunities. Minimize displacement of residents when building new housing.

Policy 4

Address Needs of Diverse Income Groups. Ensure that neighborhoods address the diverse socio-economic and physical needs of current and future residents. Encourage workforce housing and the preservation and rehabilitation of units with stabilized rents due to the Rent Stabilization Ordinance (RSO).

Policy 5

Alleviate Overcrowding. Alleviate over-crowding housing conditions through greater accessibility to a range of housing choices.

Policy 6

Affordability. Encourage affordable housing options by promoting the benefits of tax credit and homebuyer incentive programs that involve the reuse and rehabilitation of existing structures as a viable option to "tear down" redevelopment.

A community that supports cohesive neighborhoods and lifecycle housing to promote health and safety. Policy 1

Complete Streets. Support healthy aging in place and childhood development by promoting safe, "complete" streets within residential neighborhoods.

Policy 2

Universal Design. Promote housing practices that support aging in place through universal design within residential structures (e.g. stepless entrances, space for platform lifts, wide door frames and turning space).

Policy 3

Multi-Modal Linkages. Ensure that residential areas provide convenient multimodal linkages to nearby transit, recreational, and other public facilities.

Policy 4

Parks and Open Space. Encourage the development of parks and open space, as well as a network of pedestrian walkways for physical activities in all residential neighborhoods.

Policy 5

Adequate Lighting and Street Maintenance. Provide safe streets, parks, recreation facilities, sidewalks, and bike facilities by providing adequate lighting and well kept, paved surfaces.

Utilize public right-of-ways to link residential neighborhoods to nearby open space and amenities. Policy 1

Alleys. Maintain and improve existing neighborhood alleys as an alternative, safe, well-maintained vehicular access to homes that reduces curb cuts, driveways, and associated pedestrian‐automobile conflicts along sidewalks. Explore the possibility of using alleys as flexible spaces for recreation and ‘green’ uses such as storm water capture.

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Policy 2

Green Spaces. Preserve Green Spaces and create linkages to Open Spaces within the Plan Area and outside the Plan Area where deemed appropriate.

Policy 3

Pedestrian Design/Orientation. Ensure that recreational amenities are accessible by pedestrians.

Policy 4

Freeway Underpasses. Ensure that freeway underpasses have appropriate lighting and are accessible by pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers. Consider freeway underpasses as opportunities for public art.

Policy 5

Creative Opportunities for Recreational Amenities. In appropriate locations, consider using the existing public right-of-way for recreational amenities, like workout equipment or the running track at Evergreen Cemetery.

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS Goal LU7.

Goal LU8.

Safe, secure, healthy and high quality single-family residential environments that provide housing for a variety of economic levels, ages and ethnicities. Policy 1

Housing Density. Maintain the existing density of single-family residential neighborhoods by directing more intensive residential development to areas identified in this Plan that have the capacity to accommodate such growth, to neighborhoods designated as Medium and Low Medium I and II Residential.

Policy 2

Protect Neighborhoods. Protect existing single-family residential neighborhoods from encroachment by higher density residential and other incompatible uses.

New subdivision tracts, parcel maps, or small lot subdivisions which are compatible with the environment and surrounding development pattern and overall neighborhood character with respect to density, lot size and width, grading, setbacks, orientation, streetscape, and circulation. Policy 1

Architectural Compatibility. Seek a high degree of architectural compatibility and landscaping for new infill development as well as additions to existing structures in order to protect the character and scale of existing single-family residential neighborhoods.

Policy 2

Height Transitions. Provide height transitions between established low density neighborhoods and adjacent multi-family, commercial, and industrial areas.

MULTIPLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS Goal LU9.

An environment of safe, inviting, secure and high-quality multi-family neighborhoods for all segments of the community. Policy 1

Maintenance and Rehabilitation. Maintain existing multi-family neighborhoods and support programs for the renovation and rehabilitation of deteriorated and aging housing stock.

Policy 2

‘Crime Prevention through Environmental Design’ (CPTED). Pursue urban design strategies that reduce street crime and violence such as CPTED (e.g. "defensible

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space", "eyes on the street", and pedestrian friendly lighting) without creating barriers that disconnect neighborhoods.

Goal LU10.

Goal LU11.

Goal LU12.

Policy 3

Graffiti Abatement. Pursue urban design strategies that effectively address graffiti abatement.

Policy 4

Utility Design. Integrate service elements and infrastructure such as mechanical equipment, trash enclosures and utilities into the design of projects. Locate service elements and infrastructure away from street views and screen and/or enclose equipment in order to enhance the pedestrian experience and aesthetic appeal of the building and overall neighborhood. Place utilities underground where possible.

A community of neighborhoods where social capital is promoted by ensuring the provisions of adequate housing for all persons regardless of income, age, racial or ethnic background. Policy 1

Diverse and Affordable Housing. Prioritize housing that is affordable to a broad cross-section of income levels, provides a range of residential product types, and that supports the ability to live near work.

Policy 2

Mixed-income Neighborhoods. Strive to eliminate residential segregation and concentrations of poverty by promoting affordable housing that is integrated into mixed-income neighborhoods.

Policy 3

Senior Housing. Ensure that adequate housing units for senior citizens are developed within the Community Plan area.

Policy 4

Transitional Housing. Ensure that the development of transitional housing units and emergency shelters are appropriately located within the Community Plan area.

Policy 5

Accessory Dwelling Units. Allow for the conversion to residential use, accessory site structures in areas zoned to accommodate multi-family densities as a means of maintaining existing character while allowing for additional housing types.

A variety of well-designed multiple-family housing located on or near major corridors that provide safe and convenient access to public transit, services, and amenities. Policy 1

Locate Density Appropriately. Locate higher residential densities near commercial centers, light rail transit stations and major bus routes where public service facilities, utilities, and topography will accommodate this development. Provide pedestrian linkages to connect residential uses with transit infrastructure.

Policy 2

Housing near Schools. Provide a range of housing types and affordable housing units around schools.

Policy 3

On-site Amenities. Encourage new multi-family developments to provide amenities for residents such as on-site recreational facilities, community meeting spaces, and useable private and/or public open spaces.

Multiple-family developments, including small lot subdivisions, apartments, and condominiums, that exhibit the architectural characteristics and qualities that distinguish Boyle Heights, while incorporating complementary design elements and appropriate transitions when adjacent to lower-density neighborhoods.

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Policy 1

Neighborhood Transitions. Ensure that new multi-family developments adjacent to single-family neighborhoods maintain the visual and physical character of single-family housing.

Policy 2

Density Transitions. Develop small lot subdivisions on multiple-family lots adjacent to single-family lots to serve as transitional density and aesthetic buffers.

Policy 3

Legacy Single-Family. Ensure that new units and additions in Legacy SingleFamily (R2) neighborhoods maintain the visual and physical characteristics that exemplify low-density development patterns, including general site orientation, the maintenance of front yard setbacks, modulation of building volumes, articulation of façades and us e of appropriate building materials.

Policy 4

Front yard character. Create a buffer between private and public spaces by encouraging landscaping between residential structures and the public right of way.

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COMMERCIAL GOALS AND POLICIES OVERARCHING COMMERCIAL GOALS AND POLICIES Goal LU13.

Goal LU14.

Commercial areas that serve the community with a wide range of goods and services, support the local businesses and economy, and provide a diversity of employment. Policy 1

Commercial Preservation. Protect areas designated and zoned for commercial use so that commercial development and reinvestment is encouraged and the community maintains and increases its employment base. Strongly discourage new residential-only development in commercially designated and zoned areas.

Policy 2

Encourage New Development in Established Centers. New commercial uses shall be encouraged to locate in existing, established community commercial nodes, centers and transit oriented development areas and reuse existing structures that reinforce desirable neighborhood character.

Policy 3

Public Amenities. Integrate public amenities such as community meeting rooms, civic auditoriums, childcare facilities, plazas, play areas, public art, and open spaces in new development to create destinations for residents to shop and gather and to foster creativity and the arts. Utilize development standards to encourage new developments to provide public amenities, or significantly upgrade nearby amenities.

Policy 4

Diverse and Desirable Uses. Maintain a diversity of uses that strengthen the local economic base and expand market opportunities for existing and new businesses. Promote an equitable distribution of desirable uses and amenities throughout the community, including full service grocery stores, quality sit-down restaurants, and entertainment venues.

Policy 5

Activity-Generating Uses. Encourage the owners of existing commercial shopping centers to include additional uses, such as restaurants, entertainment, childcare facilities, public meeting rooms, recreation, and public open spaces that enhance neighborhood activity.

Policy 6

Encourage Office Uses. Encourage the development of business, creative professional and medical offices along commercial corridors within a variety of building typologies.

Policy 7

Range of Health Services. Make it a priority to provide a range of health services (e.g. primary, preventative, dental care, prenatal, counseling) in locations that are accessible to the community.

Policy 8

Co-location of services. Promote the joint location of health services and social services facilities in schools, community centers, senior centers and other public facilities, and locate near transit whenever feasible.

Attractive commercial areas with design elements that reflect Boyle Heights’ architectural history and character. Policy 1

Cultural Destination. Identify and promote Boyle Heights cultural resources as tourist destinations to support local businesses and promote pedestrian activity.

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Goal LU15.

Goal LU16.

Policy 2

Architectural Excellence. Ensure that projects are developed to achieve excellence in architectural and environmental design and adhere to a high level of quality in construction and material methods.

Policy 3

Signage. Integrate commercial signs into the design of buildings as a means of enhancing the streetscape appearance

Policy 4

Building Façade. Preserve and reinforce neighborhood identity by incorporating features on the building façade that add visual interest to the environment and architectural elements that add scale and character.

Conserve, enhance and regenerate the distinctive character of the Community by promoting continued pedestrian orientation Policy 1

Street Vendors. Coordinate with other agencies to streamline the process for street vending permits and vending in public and quasi-public spaces, as desired by the community.

Policy 2

Promote Active Public Spaces. Foster creativity, the arts, and public health through promotion of the use of public space for recreational and cultural programs, public art projects, farmer’s markets and other health-centered events.

Policy 3

Pedestrian Orientation. Preserve and maintain existing pedestrian orientation along commercial and mixed-use boulevards and discourage building alterations that would diminish the pedestrian environment.

Policy 4

Building Orientation. Improve neighborhood character and the pedestrian environment by siting buildings so they interact with the sidewalk and the street, contribute to a sense of human scale, and support ease of accessibility to buildings.

Policy 5

Activate First Floor Frontages. Require first floor street frontage of structures, including parking structures, to incorporate commercial or other active public uses.

Policy 6

Off-street Parking at the Rear. Recommend that new developments along commercial corridors locate required parking at the rear of the property or facilitate the creation of nearby shared satellite parking facilities in order to strengthen the pedestrian experience by continuing to orient buildings toward the sidewalk thereby enhancing the public realm.

Policy 7

Local Businesses. Implement innovative parking standards that support a thriving local business environment.

Prioritize mixed-use projects within community commercial nodes, centers and transit oriented development areas. Policy 1

Prioritize New Infill Development Close to Transit. Prioritize new infill development in close proximity to mass transit centers and stations. Encourage the development of vacant MTA staging and CRA owned parcels for appropriate infill development that is compatible with Boyle Heights character.

Policy 2

Parking Near Transit Stations. Encourage innovative parking strategies for developments that locate near major bus centers and mass transit stations and that provide pedestrian, bicycle, and exceptional ADA facilities.

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Goal LU17.

Goal LU18.

Goal LU19.

Policy 3

Housing for Families. Promote construction of residential units with three or more bedrooms which are suitable for larger families.

Policy 4

Public Amenities/Community Facilities. Encourage large mixed-use projects and other large new development projects to incorporate child care and/or other appropriate human service facilities as part of the project.

Commercial development that is safe, easily accessible, and is compatible with and complementary to neighboring residential neighborhoods. Policy 1

Neighborhood Compatibility. Ensure that new development adjacent to residential neighborhoods is designed in a manner that is sensitive to existing and adjacent buildings so that it blends in with the neighborhood context.

Policy 2

Transitions. Provide transitional setbacks and upper floor step backs for new projects adjacent to residential uses in order to maintain access to light and air and minimize operational impacts.

Policy 3

Parking Structures Adjacent to Residential Uses. Utilize a decorative wall and landscaped setbacks to buffer residential uses from parking areas and structures. Shield and direct on-site lighting onto driveways and walkways and away from adjacent residential uses.

Safe, comfortable, and attractive streetscapes designed for pedestrians and bicyclists. Policy 1

Pedestrian and Bicycle Amenities. Provide pedestrian and bicycle amenities such as trash receptacles, street furniture, bicycle racks, and enhanced crosswalks as part of new projects to enhance the street atmosphere and encourage walking or bicycling to nearby commercial establishments.

Policy 2

Pedestrian Access and Connections. Provide safe and direct pedestrian entrances from the sidewalk and the street and encourage connections to abutting commercial development. Utilize techniques to increase motorist awareness of pedestrians, such as lighting, raised crosswalks, changes in paving, signage or other devices.

Policy 3

Landscape Design. Require new projects and encourage existing developments to install street trees and landscaping to create a more inviting commercial area that provides shade canopy, reduces ambient temperature, and softens the physical environment.

Policy 4

Lighting and Graffiti. Use lighting and graffiti abatement to help reduce street crime and violence and promote a sense of safety and the attractive appearance of commercial centers and parking areas. Install on-site lighting along all pedestrian and vehicular access ways.

Policy 5

Utility Design. Integrate service elements and infrastructure such as mechanical equipment, trash enclosures and utilities into the design of projects. Locate service elements and infrastructure away from street views and screen and/or enclose equipment in order to enhance the pedestrian experience and aesthetic appeal of the building and overall neighborhood. Underground utilities where possible.

Environmentally sustainable commercial development that uses environmentallyfriendly design to minimize consumption of non-renewable natural resources and replenish the community’s underground basins.

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Goal LU20.

Goal LU21.

Policy 1

"Green" Design. Design new buildings to respond to the climate of Boyle Heights through their orientation, massing, and construction. Consider using passive solar design strategies, such as overhangs and shade trees, orienting building volumes, windows, and second-stories to maximize solar access, constructing wellinsulated wall systems, and providing usable covered outdoor areas to generate more comfortable and energy-efficient buildings.

Policy 2

Green Building Practices. Promote green building practices that support "healthy outcomes", particularly in addressing Air Quality and exposure to toxic/hazardous materials.

Policy 3

Encourage LEED Standards. Encourage projects to include Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Standards.

Policy 4

Toxic Hotspots. Require strict application of environmental requirements and restrictions for maintenance, use, development, and redevelopment adjacent and within Toxic Hot Spots.

Policy 5

Permeable Surfaces. Increase areas of permeability in conjunction with the design of any new project by utilizing permeable surfaces on driveways, walkways, and outdoor spaces in order to capture, infiltrate, and store water on site.

Policy 6

"Edible Landscaping". Encourage creation of edible front yards, edible parkways and sidewalks in areas identified by the community.

Policy 7

Drought Tolerant Landscaping. Encourage tenants, homeowners, and the development community to envision and incorporate designed landscapes projects that include native and drought tolerant species as appropriate to the street context.

Policy 8

Green Spaces. Preservation of Green Spaces and Create Linkages to Open Spaces within the Plan Area and outside the Plan Area where deemed appropriate.

Effectively address uses which are detrimental to the health and welfare of the community, including automobile-oriented uses and over-concentrated uses. Policy 1

Auto-Related Uses and Services. Allow for the development of new auto-related uses, such as gasoline stations, drive-thru establishments, automobile sales and repair, and storage facilities in designated land near freeways on- and off-ramps. Expansions and modifications of existing auto-related uses are required to be designed to achieve stringent environmental standards and a high-quality architecture and landscape character.

Policy 2

Screen and Buffer. Require screening of open storage and auto-related uses, and limit visibility of automobile parts storage and other related products from public view.

Policy 3

Monitoring of Alcohol Permits. Strictly limit the issuance or renewal of Conditional Use Permits for Alcohol. Apply strict standards and incentivize responsible businesses and practices.

Policy 4

Revoke Public Nuisances. Encourage greater use of the City’s revocation process to close down serious public nuisance alcohol sales outlets and sites involved with repeated drug sales and non-compliance.

Healthy foods are conveniently available in all neighborhoods.

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Policy 1

Preserve "Tienditas" [Mini-Markets]. Recognize existing tienditas as fresh food access points and as an integral part of a neighborhoods’ cultural and economic character. Incentivize existing tienditas to comply with fresh food healthy standards.

Policy 2

Full Service Grocers. Utilize development incentives to attract full-service grocery stores and encourage stores to sell fresh, healthy organic foods (such as produce) in underserved areas.

Policy 3

Prioritize Grocers. Encourage procedures that streamline the development review process and fast-track permitting for grocery stores in underserved areas.

Policy 4

Farmers’ Markets. Encourage farmers’ markets in parks, plazas and other appropriate locations to provide ready access to healthful and nutritious foods.

NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICTS Goal LU22.

Goal LU23.

A pedestrian-friendly neighborhood commercial district that serves the surrounding neighborhoods, supports local businesses, fosters a sense of community, and serves as a gathering place. Policy 1

Neighborhood-Oriented Uses and Services. Encourage the retention of existing and the development of new neighborhood services and retail that serve the surrounding neighborhoods, such as sit-down restaurants, cafes, childcare facilities, daycare and school facilities, public open space, quality retail, and essential neighborhood-serving businesses, such as barber shops, florists, and other personal services.

Policy 2

Limit new stand-alone residential uses. Discourage new residential only uses in Neighborhood Commercial designated areas to maintain an adequate level of neighborhood commercial services.

Policy 3

Limit Incompatible Uses. Maintain the neighborhood feel of these districts by limiting uses that impact the built environment, reduce walkability and contain incompatible operations that spill over into the residential neighborhoods (i.e. auto-related uses and drive-thru restaurants).

Policy 4

Small-Scale Development. Design projects to be compatible in scale and character with surrounding neighborhoods so that they do not interrupt the community fabric or street grid. Limit buildings to two stories in height in designated neighborhood districts.

Neighborhood commercial districts which are accessible by sustainable modes of transportation such as walking or biking. Policy 1

Daily Needs within Walking Distance. Ensure that a mix of uses that serve the daily needs of adjacent residential areas occur within neighborhood commercial districts in order to encourage walkability.

Policy 2

Pedestrian-Friendly Buildings. Design new commercial and mixed use buildings and additions so that they enhance the public realm through well designed frontages that provide pedestrian-scaled features such as awnings, plazas, and courtyards and direct access from public sidewalks.

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Goal LU24.

Policy 3

Off-street Parking at the Rear. Require that new developments within neighborhood districts located required parking at the rear of the property in order to strengthen the pedestrian experience.

Policy 4

Way-Finding Signage. Include pedestrian-oriented way-finding signage to encourage pedestrian activity.

A strong identity for Cesar E. Chavez Boulevard (formerly Brooklyn Avenue), the community’s historical “Main Street”, as the most important pedestrian commercial corridor. Policy 1

Architectural Design. Utilize architecture to create a sense of place and build upon Boyle Height’s history.

Policy 2

Small-town Character. Retain the ‘Main Street’ character of Cesar E. Chavez Boulevard by limiting building heights, maintaining the existing building line pattern, and providing entrances from the sidewalk.

Policy 3

Streetscape Enhancement. Enhance the streetscape through the planting of additional street trees and creating bulb-outs and enhanced crosswalks.

Policy 4

Reuse Existing Structures. A diversity of neighborhoods serving uses shall be encouraged to cluster and adaptively reuse existing historic structures within established neighborhood districts toward reinforcing desirable neighborhood character.

COMMUNITY CENTERS Goal LU25.

Vibrant, healthy and attractive commercial centers that serve as destination points for civic, cultural, and economic life for the adjoining neighborhoods and communities, and provide needed goods, services and jobs in a pedestrian-friendly environment. Policy 1

Higher Density and Mixed-Use. Locate higher densities and mixes of uses in Community Centers, as appropriate.

Policy 2

Design for Transitions. Require that the scale and massing of new development along corridors provide appropriate transitions in building height and bulk that are sensitive to the physical and visual character of adjoining neighborhoods with lower development intensities and building heights

Policy 3

Commercial Development. Promote commercial development by reducing building setbacks adjacent to a public street and reducing off-street parking requirements. Reductions of on-site parking requirements may be considered if it can be determined that the quantity of proposed parking would adequately serve the site or that additional on-street parking or shared parking is provided.

Policy 4

Housing. Permit residential uses above the ground-floor or behind the street frontage. Encourage the development of affordable housing within Community Centers.

Policy 5

Circulation. Create and improve pedestrian and bicycle connections by providing dedicated sidewalks connecting businesses within the development, surrounding the development, and connecting the development to nearby neighborhoods. Provide access through barriers separating the development from adjacent neighborhoods.

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TRANSIT-ORIENTED DISTRICTS AND MIXED-USE BOULEVARDS Goal LU26.

Transit-Oriented developments around transit stations that are vibrant and safe, engage pedestrians, contribute to street life, contain a variety of uses, have direct and convenient access to transit facilities, and are characterized by low to moderate density as appropriate to the existing scale and context. Policy 1

Transit-Oriented Development. Encourage projects to include a mix of transitsupportive uses, such as shops, restaurants, offices, housing, and hotels within a quarter mile of Metro Gold Line Stations to serve local residents, employees, businesses, and transit commuters.

Policy 2

Community Amenities. Encourage new development projects, particularly projects which utilize floor area incentives or density bonuses, to incorporate community facilities such as libraries, child care facilities, community meeting rooms, public art and plazas, health centers, senior centers, police sub-stations, and/or other appropriate human service facilities.

Policy 3

Housing. Include a variety of new housing types, such as townhomes, apartments, and condominiums that cater to a diversity of households near public transit as a means of enhancing retail, transit viability, and reducing vehicle trips.

Policy 4

Corner Lots. Design buildings located at intersections to define and give prominence to the corner on which they are sited by acknowledging both street facades with façade articulation and detail.

Policy 5

Streetscape Plans. Develop Streetscape Plans for major corridors near TODs that create pedestrian-friendly environments and ensure accessibility and connectivity to the stations.

Policy 6

Shared Parking. Design large projects with multi-use facilities to share parking and amenities between uses and with other adjacent developments. Consider upgrading the existing City of Los Angeles parking lots to accommodate more shared parking.

Policy 7

On-Street Parking. Increase on-street parking opportunities, such as angled parking, that support unique shopping experiences and calm traffic movement while providing additional parking for local businesses and services along 1st St, 4th St., and Whittier Blvd.

Policy 8

Local Transit Services. Promote para-transit and other local shuttle systems, and bicycle amenities that provide access for residents of adjacent neighborhoods.

Policy 9

Transit Access. Orient new development to provide convenient access to the nearest transit station wherever possible.

REGIONAL CENTER COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS Goal LU27.

A strong and competitive Regional Center District that serves the needs of the broader community and region.

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Policy 1

Commercial Development. Maximize opportunity sites by accommodating larger commercial projects in Regional Centers to minimize impact on residential neighborhoods and help retain the existing community fabric.

Policy 2

Sears Tower Opportunity Site. Establish a regional commercial presence by providing a dynamic mix of uses including retail, office, entertainment, cultural and residential uses contributing to an inviting destination.

Policy 3

Marengo Street Corridor. Foster development of the Marengo Corridor Regional Center into a compact high intensity office and medical center, with a strong medical, commercial, and visitor-serving orientation, while permitting residential development to provide vitality during non-work hours.

Policy 4

Large-scale Development. Major new developments should be designed to integrate pedestrian-oriented features and connections, abundant landscaping, paseos and alleys. “Superblocks” should be discouraged. Where development fronts on multiple streets, its design should include architectural features on all street frontages.

Policy 5

Commercial Uses Along Ground Floor Frontages. Require that the first floor of structures, located within regional center commercial areas, to incorporate active commercial uses to create pedestrian-friendly shopping streets. Projects should also feature well-appointed paseos and plazas, as appropriate.

Policy 6

Encourage Iconic Buildings. Encourage the development of iconic public and private buildings in key locations to create new landmarks and focal features that contribute to the regional district’s structure and identity.

Policy 7

Tailored Parking Amenities. Promote dynamic, mixed-use Regional Centers by incentivizing structured parking, discouraging surface parking lots, and reducing parking requirements, as appropriate.

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INDUSTRIAL CENTERS Goal LU28.

Goal LU29.

Industrial uses that provide job opportunities, particularly for local residents, and minimize environmental and visual impacts to the community. Policy 1

Retain Industrial land. Large industrial designed parcels located in predominantly industrial areas shall not be developed with other uses that do not support the industrial base of the community and the city.

Policy 2

Improve safety and jobs. Ensure that industrial land uses are safe for human health and the environment and that they provide a robust source of employment.

Policy 3

Hazardous materials. Promote the phasing out or relocation of facilities used for the storage, processing, or distribution of potentially hazardous petroleum or chemical compounds, and discourage any further expansion of existing facilities.

Policy 4

Toxins and Contamination. Require the removal and management of environmental toxins in accordance with existing local, regional and federal policies and avoid future environmental contamination.

Land use compatibility between industrial, residential and commercial uses, improving the aesthetic quality and design of industrial areas. Policy 1

Residential Restrictions. Restrict adaptive re-use and live/work uses in MR zones (Limited and Light Manufacturing Zones).

Policy 2

Adequate parking. Require adequate customer and employee parking be provided for all types of industrial and manufacturing facilities, and that truck traffic and parking be restricted from residential areas.

Policy 3

Link Residents to Jobs. Improve the multi-modal connections of residential areas to industrial areas to link existing residents to nearby jobs, training and needed services.

Policy 4

Compliance with Design Guidelines. Design projects to achieve a high level of quality and to be developed in accordance with the Industrial Citywide Design Guidelines.

Policy 5

Neighborhood Compatibility. Require design techniques, such as appropriate building orientation and scale, landscaping, buffering, noise insulation and increased setbacks, in the development of new industrial properties adjacent to non-industrial uses to improve land use compatibility and to enhance the physical environment.

Policy 6

Landscaped Buffers. Incorporate landscaped buffers between the buildings and abutting residential properties. Methods to buffer projects should include a combination of increased setbacks, landscaping, berms and/or screening, and fencing.

Policy 7

Street beautification. Encourage streetscape improvements such as street trees, sidewalks, landscaping, lighting, and undergrounding of utilities.

Policy 8

Walls and Fences. Design walls, fences, and screens used for concealment purposes to blend with the site’s architectural style and soften them with clinging vines or shrubs. When security fencing is required, utilize a combination of solid

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pillars, open iron fence elements, solid wall segments, and grillwork. Chain link fencing and barbed wire fencing is not allowed.

Goal LU30.

Policy 9

Integration of Utilities. Integrate service elements and infrastructure such as mechanical equipment, trash enclosures and utilities with the design of projects. Locate service elements and infrastructure away from crosswalks or sidewalks and screen and/or enclose equipment in order to enhance the pedestrian experience and aesthetic appeal of the building and overall neighborhood.

Policy 10

Infrastructure Improvements. Encourage infrastructure improvements such as lighting, sewer, drainage and improvements to the road bed on streets designated as truck routes to support heavy truck traffic.

Environmentally-friendly businesses that offer green jobs and a healthier environment, and utilize design, technology, and water conservation methods which help minimize consumption of non-renewable natural resources and replenishes the City’s underground basin. Policy 1

Connections to the Los Angeles River. Encourage new development and infrastructure improvement projects to create connections to the Los Angeles River.

Policy 2

Support Food Hub Industries. Encourage local food distribution systems to thrive and promote cohesiveness between our local food system and regional food systems that result in the immediate community having access to local and sustainable food.

Policy 3

Encourage sustainable industry. Incentivize development opportunities for businesses that are oriented towards green and/or clean technologies, and employ green building practices and processes.

Policy 4

Green Design. New and existing industrial developments should use green design and technology for energy efficiency and water conservation, use recycling resources, establish native and drought-tolerant landscaping and use permeable surfaces on walkways and outdoor spaces.

Policy 5

Clean-Up Green-Up. Prioritize green policies and funding of implementation green programs that will address: Prevention, Reduction, Revitalization, and Reinvestment as core areas to create healthy communities and job opportunities within the Plan Area.

HYBRID INDUSTRIAL CORRIDORS Goal LU31.

Hybrid industrial corridors that facilitate transitions from traditional industrial districts to neighborhoods and commercial areas, and accommodate job generating uses with limited residential uses in selected areas. Policy 1

Transitions. Require transitions for industrial uses, from intensive uses to less intensive uses, in those areas in close proximity to residential neighborhoods

Policy 2

Adequate Employee Amenities. Encourage employee amenities (restaurants, green recreational spaces, etc.) in transitional areas.

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Policy 3

Industrial Historic Preservation. Support the study of parking districts to allow for reduced parking requirements for developments that preserve historic industrial structures.

Policy 4

Maintain Existing Industrial Land Where appropriate. Maintain existing industrial land uses where appropriate as well as designate lands, for new emerging industry including industrial parks, research and development facilities, light manufacturing, and other similar uses which provide employment opportunities, particularly those in ‘clean and green’ technology.

Policy 5

Facilitate Industrial Revitalization. Encourage the aggregation of smaller, older sites to facilitate revitalization or reuse where appropriate.

Policy 6

Sustain the arts. Encourage artisanal and creative industries in light industrial zones, particularly in adaptive reuse of obsolete industrial buildings.

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ART, HISTORY, AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION Goal LU32.

Goal LU33.

A community in which artistic, historic and cultural resources are preserved for education and enjoyment by existing residents and future generations. Policy 1

Historic Resource Preservation. Support the preservation of culturally and historically significant sites, places, monuments, parks, gardens, plazas, churches, murals, temples, libraries, and historic and culturally significant structures, in Boyle Heights.

Policy 2

Identify Historic and Cultural Resources. Identify Historic and Cultural Resources and provide appropriate tools to safeguard unprotected resources.

Policy 3

Environmental Review. Ensure careful environmental review of project proposals that may affect designation-eligible historic resources.

Policy 4

Encourage Original Façade Restoration and Complementary New Construction. Encourage the preservation, conservation, rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of existing buildings in commercial areas through the restoration of original facades and the design of new construction which complements the prevailing historic pattern of development.

Policy 5

Special Districts. Support the study of overlay districts for neighborhoods that retain a cohesive community character but are not eligible to become Historic Preservation Overlay Zones.

Policy 6

Community Partnerships. Forge partnerships with relevant neighborhood organizations to advance preservation efforts in the community through educational and informational programs.

Policy 7

Identify partnerships for funding. Identify new financial resources for low- and moderate-income owners of historic homes.

Policy 8

Rehabilitation. Promote the use of the City’s Mills Act Historical Property Contract Program, the Federal Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit, and the California Historical Building Code for the preservation and rehabilitation of historic resources. Any project which involves designated historic resources, including the City of Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monuments, shall conform with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation.

A community that capitalizes upon and enhances its existing cultural resources. Policy 1

Preserve Murals. Encourage the maintenance of historic murals in commercial and residential neighborhoods throughout the community plan.

Policy 2

Awareness of Cultural Resources. Promote community awareness of cultural amenities by implementing the Department of Cultural Affairs’ Cultural Master Plan and the Office of Historic Resources’ Cultural Heritage Master Plan.

Policy 3

Public/Private Partnerships. Promote public/private partnerships to create new informational and educational programs, tours and signage programs that highlight the community’s history and architectural legacy.

Policy 4

Protect Community-Identified Cultural Resources. Protect and enhance places and features identified within the community as cultural resources for the City of Los Angeles.

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Policy 5

Cultural Programs at Local Schools. Encourage the coordination of cultural programs at local schools utilizing resources such as the Cultural Affairs Department and local artists.

Policy 6

Cultural Heritage Tourism. Encourage cultural heritage tourism by capitalizing on existing monuments within the community and by supporting efforts to showcase important historic resources and events.

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SPECIAL DISTRICTS Goal LU34.

Support the creation of arts districts that stimulate the local commerce and sustainability in all sectors of the arts, culture, and entertainment. Policy 1

Arts District. Encourage the development of an Arts District or Business Improvement District.

Policy 2

Cultural Facilities. Actively support the development of arts, cultural, and entertainment facilities and events in Boyle Heights to attract visitors and establish unique cultural destinations.

Policy 3

Celebrate Artists. Encourage the development of individual studios, galleries, offices, live/work units for artists, architects, landscape architects, interior designers, craftsmen/women, and other design-art oriented professionals.

Policy 4

Public Art Display. Develop accessible locations and public spaces for display of public art, featuring both permanent and temporary installations.

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MOBILITY OVERARCHING GOALS AND POLICIES Goal M1.

Goal M2.

A diverse system of streets that balances the needs of existing and future pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, physically challenged persons, and vehicles. Policy 1

Complete Streets. Ensure the community is served by a complete street system with some streets strategically prioritized for target user(s) and other streets that connect the arterials to serve all users.

Policy 2

Mobility for Challenged Users. Support, wherever feasible, transportation programs and services aimed at enhancing the mobility of senior citizens, disabled persons and the transit-dependent population.

Policy 3

Mobility Enhancements. Design developments that increase density or intensity through discretionary actions to provide adequate mobility enhancements such as traffic mitigation, pedestrian crosswalks, trails, bicycle lanes and enhanced bus stops to ensure that mobility needs are met.

Policy 4

Private Investment for Off-site Facilities/Amenities. Encourage new developments to include bicycle and pedestrian amenities and off-site public transit and road improvements, creating a circulation system that optimizes travel by all modes.

Policy 5

Modified Street Standards. Where there is evidence of physical or other constraints, the City should consider modified street standards to implement modal priorities and to facilitate a “complete street” network.

A multi-modal circulation system that incorporates public open space, gathering places, and watershed management techniques into neighborhood commercial areas. Policy 1

Streetscapes. Foster the appeal of the street as a gathering place by encouraging streetscape improvements such as street furniture, street trees, courtyards and plazas, wide sidewalks with landscaping, and appropriate traffic control measures to reduce travel speeds.

Policy 2

Special Events. Encourage and support special street closures for community activities such as street fairs, parades, farmer’s markets, festivals and other civic events, especially along 1st Street and Cesar E. Chavez Avenue in the community core.

Policy 3

Watershed Management. Support watershed management in the design of streets by incorporating swales, water retention and other such features in new development, through streetscape programs and other street improvement programs.

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Goal M3.

A system of safe, efficient, and attractive pedestrian and bicycle routes linking neighborhoods to key areas in the community, including commercial centers, services and employment, points of historical interest, as well as open space and recreational areas. Policy 1

Safety for All Users. Minimize conflicts between the various modes of motorized and non-motorized transportation by designing and repairing roads, sidewalks, crosswalks, bicycle lanes and trails to their proper specifications. Also include appropriate signage and well-marked crossings to ensure safety for all users of the roadway.

Policy 2

Safe School Routes. Encourage the development and improvement of safe routes to schools throughout the community via walking, bicycling or public transit.

Policy 3

Easements and Rights-of-Way. Wherever feasible, encourage the safe utilization of easements and/or rights-of-way along flood control channels, utilities, railroad rights-of-way and streets for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Policy 4

Underutilized Public Rights-of-Way. Repurpose underutilized roadway and rightsof-way for recreational uses.

Policy 5

Reclaimed Land. Incorporate trails and bicycle facilities into recreational reuse of reclaimed land such as of utility rights-of-way, flood control channels, and access roads.

WALKING Goal M4.

A community-wide pleasant street environment that is universally accessible, safe, and convenient for pedestrians. Policy 1

Pedestrian-Oriented Development. Encourage walking by orienting building entrances to face the streets and sidewalks when designing new developments and buildings.

Policy 2

Pedestrian Priority Routes. Streets within commercial, mixed-use and employment districts should have pedestrian priority, establishing pedestrian needs as paramount to vehicular circulation needs. Investment in pedestrian improvements and programs for these segments should be encouraged.

Policy 3

Pedestrian Amenities. Maintain sidewalks, streets and rights-of-way in good condition, free of obstructions, and with adequate lighting, trees and parkways.

Policy 4

Parking. Consider implementing angled parking or other parking strategies along the 1st Street business corridor, to provide additional parking opportunities and to create a more pedestrian-friendly, environment.

BICYCLING Goal M5.

A safe, comprehensive, and integrated bikeway network that encourages bicycling for recreation and transportation.

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Policy 1

Bikeway Connections. Provide bicycle access to allow easy connection between residential neighborhoods, employment centers, open space areas, as well as important non-work destinations.

Policy 2

Bicycle Priority Streets. Support the Citywide bikeway network to establish bicycle circulation as paramount to vehicular circulation needs on key streets and to encourage investment in bicycle improvements and programs on identified streets.

Policy 3

Bicycle Amenities. Incorporate bicycle amenities in public facilities, parks, commercial and multi-family residential developments, employment and transit centers, as well as park and ride facilities.

Policy 4

Regional Coordination. Coordinate with appropriate City and County agencies, adjacent jurisdictions, non-profit organizations, and the local community to require that bikeways be linked with those existing and proposed in adjacent areas.

PUBLIC TRANSIT Goal M6.

Goal M7.

An integrated land use and public transit strategy that directs growth to areas which are accessible by public transit facilities and services. Policy 1

Transit Connections to Key Areas. Increase public transit access to neighborhood districts, mixed-use boulevards, community and regional centers.

Policy 2

Development at Transit Nodes. Facilitate development and public improvements at multimodal transit nodes to promote convenient access between new development and the transit system.

Policy 3

Shuttle Services. Encourage new major developments to provide on-demand shuttle services to Metro stations, community centers, or destinations in and around Boyle Heights.

Policy 4

Land Uses Adjacent to Stations. Encourage a coordinated integration of development around transit stations to improve services, access and the economic vitality of the community.

An expanded public transit system that provides safe and efficient access to jobs, services, recreation and other community assets so that automobile dependence may be reduced. Policy 1

Transit Priority Streets. Support the identification of transit priority street segments with high transit vehicle volumes to facilitate public transit circulation as paramount to vehicular circulation needs and to encourage investment in transit improvement programs for the identified routes.

Policy 2

Transit Access and Amenities. Provide enhanced amenities at major transit stops, such as: widened sidewalks, pedestrian waiting areas, transit shelters, enhanced lighting, improved crosswalks, information kiosks, shade trees, bicycle access and

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self-cleaning restrooms. Improve the ease and convenience of using transit by making improvements to transit waiting areas for pedestrians and cyclists. Policy 3

Street Enhancements for Buses. Support street improvements which are needed to facilitate the movement of buses, such as street widening, bus bays or turnouts, street signage, striping, and colored pavement.

Policy 4

Express Bus Focus. Connect express bus service, such as DASH, Commuter Express, Metro Rapid and Bus Rapid Transit, to transit centers and to key destinations in the Boyle Heights community.

MOTORIZED VEHICLES Goal M8.

Goal M9.

A network of streets, highways, and freeways that supports existing and planned land uses, and provides improved motorized vehicle mobility, particularly on congested corridors. Policy 1

Priorities for Capacity Enhancements. Implement a safe and efficient transportation network, and increase its capacity through, in priority order, the provision of alternative transit options, transportation demand management (TDM), and traffic system management (TSM) before considering street widening and network completion.

Policy 2

Motorized Vehicle Priority Routes. Support the identification of motorized vehicle streets for arterials with the highest traffic volumes and demonstrated congestion to establish motorized vehicle circulation as paramount to alternative roadway user needs and to encourage investment in congestion relief programs and/or truck safety improvements for identified routes.

Policy 3

Access Management. Minimize driveways and consider the addition of medians or designated rights-of-way for non-motorized traffic on Major and Secondary Highways to ensure the smooth and safe flow of vehicles, buses, pedestrians, and bicycles.

Policy 4

Alley Access. Discourage the vacation and/or closure of existing public alleys and provide for alley access for properties fronting on Major or Secondary highways.

Policy 5

Emergency Access. Develop, improve, and maintain streets so that they are easily accessible to emergency vehicles.

Policy 6

Coordinated Evacuation Routes. Establish a network of routes that facilitate orderly evacuation of the community in an emergency, consistent with the Emergency Management Department adopted Evacuation Plan.

Residential neighborhoods that are protected from the intrusion of cut-through traffic, with emphasis on safety and quality of life. Policy 1

Traffic Calming. Support traffic calming measures and parking management for local and collector streets where demonstrated need exists and with active community involvement, while maintaining pedestrian and bicycle circulation.

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Goal M10.

Policy 2

Traffic Mitigations for Development. Require major developments to mitigate traffic impacts on residential neighborhoods.

Policy 3

Special Event Coordination. Encourage coordination of park-and-ride shuttle services to activities centers and special events such as street fairs, parades, and farmer’s markets.

Improved air quality and health of residents as a result of decreased single-occupant automobile demand and reduced vehicle miles traveled. Policy 1

Regional Coordination. Coordinate with Council of Government and regional transportation planning agencies (such as SCAG and Metro) and adjacent cities to improve shuttle services, encourage ride sharing, bicycle sharing, and other TDM programs within the region.

Policy 2

Auto Trip Reduction. Create incentives for employers, institutions, and residential neighborhoods to reduce their vehicle trips by encouraging mixed use developments that reduce the number of vehicle miles traveled.

Policy 3

Alternatives to the Automobile. Reduce automobile dependency by providing pedestrian linkages, a safe and convenient transit system, and a network of accessible bikeways.

Policy 4

TDM Plans. Encourage major development to submit a TDM Plan to the City and provide employee incentives for utilizing alternatives to the single-driver automobile (i.e., carpools, vanpools, buses, telecommuting, bicycling, and walking.)

Policy 5

Transportation Management Associations. Support the formation of agencies and collaboratives such as Transportation Management Associations (TMAs) that facilitate ridesharing in carpools and vanpools.

GOODS MOVEMENT Goal M11.

A community where goods and services can be delivered to its residents and businesses safely and efficiently, while maintaining the community’s character and quality of life. Policy 1

Industrial Center Siting. Site regional distribution centers and other industrial districts proximate to the freeway system, regional truck routes, and rail lines, avoiding adjacency to, and cut-through traffic in, residential neighborhoods.

Policy 2

Efficient Truck and Freight Movement. Provide appropriately designed and maintained roadways to safely accommodate truck travel and minimize adverse impacts of freight transport on residential neighborhoods.

Policy 3

On-site Loading. Ensure that all commercial and industrial development has adequate off-street accommodations for loading and unloading of commercial vehicles. Minimize potential conflicts between truck loading and unloading and pedestrian, bicycle, and transit access and circulation.

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PARKING MANAGEMENT Goal M12.

Goal M13.

An efficient parking supply that serves economic development and facilitates all modes of transportation. Policy 1

Parking Management Districts. Support the creation of a parking management district(s) in areas of high demand to facilitate parking within a group of shared facilities.

Policy 2

Performance-based Parking Supply. Utilize performance-based metrics that evaluate existing and projected parking needs in determining parking requirements.

Policy 3

Conversion of Surface Lots to Structures. Support the development of Cityowned or other surface parking lots into parking structures where appropriate.

Policy 4

Parking Design. Design parking lots and structures to include decorative materials and to screen lots from view with landscaping and setbacks.

Policy 5

Convenient Parking. Provide public parking proximate to transit centers to help protect residential neighborhoods from parking encroachment.

Parking policies and requirements that capture the true cost of private vehicle use, support livable neighborhoods, environmental/energy sustainability, and the use of alternative modes of transportation. Policy 1

Reduced Parking Near Transit Centers. Consider reductions in parking requirements for projects located within designated transit-oriented districts within 1,500 feet of a mass transit center.

Policy 2

“Park Once” Strategy. Collaborate with the business community to improve parking services, such as shared parking facilities and public valet services, to more effectively use the overall parking supply and implement a “park once and walk” strategy for commercial districts, especially on 1st Street in the downtown core.

Policy 3

Priority Parking for Alternative Fuel Vehicles. Encourage new commercial and retail developments to provide prioritized parking for shared vehicles, electric vehicles and vehicles using alternative fuels.

Policy 4

Connections for Electric Vehicles. Encourage new construction to include vehicle access to properly wired outdoor receptacles to accommodate zero emission vehicles (ZEVs) and/or plug-in electric hybrids (PHEV).

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PARKS, OPEN SPACE AND THE URBAN FOREST PARKS Goal LU35.

Goal LU36.

A variety of well-maintained parks and recreation facilities and services that meet the existing and future recreational needs of the community. Policy 1

Maintain and Improve Existing Facilities. Preserve, maintain and enhance existing recreational facilities and park space by providing amenities where appropriate, such as pedestrian paths, trails, and adequate parking.

Policy 2

Parks in Low-Income Communities First. Prioritize new parks and park renovations in underserved or low-income communities.

Policy 3

Surplus Property. Coordinate with the Department of Recreation and Parks and other applicable City departments, such as the Department of General Services and Department of Transportation, to review and evaluate surplus property as potential sites for parks and recreational activities.

Policy 4

Vacant Land. Encourage continuous effort by public agencies to acquire vacant parcels for publicly owned open space and parks.

Policy 5

Existing Public Land. Support the creation of new parks and park expansions within public rights-of-way, such as flood control channels, utility easements, debris basins, and other unused and underutilized public properties. Hiking and bicycle routes should connect these facilities with parks and open spaces throughout the community.

Policy 6

New Development. Encourage and allow opportunities for new development to provide pocket parks, small plazas, community gardens, commercial spaces, and other gathering places that are available to help meet recreational demands.

Policy 7

Joint Use Agreements. Support the establishment of joint-use agreements with private and other public entities to increase recreational opportunities, including shared use of land owned by public agencies and private property owners.

Policy 8

Cleanup Land for Public Recreation. Pursue resources to clean up land that could safely be used for public recreation.

Safe, inviting, and accessible neighborhood recreational facilities. Policy 1

Public Transit. Coordinate with the appropriate departments and agencies to create public transit that can connect neighborhoods to regional parks.

Policy 2

Walkability Standard. Set a walkability standard (e.g., a quarter- or half-mile) for residents’ access to recreational facilities.

Policy 3

Park Safety. Promote the design, construction, maintenance, and management of public parks to ensure that parks are adequately monitored, maintained, and illuminated at night, especially for families with children and senior citizens who use the parks.

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Policy 4

Enforce Park Codes. Provide for the supervision of park activities and promote enforcement of codes restricting illegal activity.

Policy 5

Adequate Police Patrols. Coordinate between the Recreation and Parks Department and the Police Department to insure adequate police patrols and defensible space design.

OPEN SPACE Goal LU37.

A community with sufficient open space in balance with new development to serve the recreational, environmental, health and safety needs of the area and to protect environmental and aesthetic resources. Policy 1

Conservation. Preserve passive and visual open space that provides wildlife habitat and corridors, wetlands, watersheds, groundwater recharge areas, and other natural resource areas.

Policy 2

Protection. Protect significant open space resources and environmentally sensitive areas from environmental hazards and incompatible land uses.

Policy 3

Grading. Minimize the grading of natural terrain to permit development in hillside areas to correspond to densities designated by this Community Plan, the geological stability of the area, and compatibility with adjoining land uses.

Policy 4

Natural Drainage. Minimize the alteration of natural drainage patterns, canyons, and water courses, except where improvements are necessary to protect life and property.

Policy 5

Development Restrictions. Restrict development on areas of known geologic hazard, unstable soil conditions or landslides.

Policy 6

Open Space Integration. Integrate the use of open space with public facilities in higher density areas, and adjacent to reservoirs, land reclamation sites, spreading grounds, power line rights-of-way and flood control channels.

Policy 7

Greenways. Establish, where feasible, multi-use greenways along waterways, rail lines, utility corridors, and public alleys to provide additional open space for passive or active recreation and to connect adjoining neighborhoods to one another and to regional open space resources.

STREETSCAPE AND URBAN FOREST Goal LU38.

A healthy and safe tree population in all neighborhoods to maximize the benefits gained from the urban forest, such as air quality improvement and aesthetic enhancement. Policy 1

Urban Forest. Encourage the preservation of the existing tree population and include new trees in an effort to achieve optimum canopy cover to reduce and mitigate the heat island effect. Include onsite trees in new development projects, whenever possible.

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Goal LU39.

Goal LU40.

Policy 2

Tree Protection. Encourage and promote the retention of trees where practical and appropriate, through education, outreach and incentives offered by the Bureau of Street Services.

Policy 3

Tree Selection. Support policies of the Bureau of Street Services to reduce conflicts with existing infrastructure through proper tree selection and through the recognition of street trees as a vital component of the City’s infrastructure.

Policy 4

Native Trees. Encourage the use of plant communities native to Los Angeles which achieve biodiversity and enhance existing wildlife habitats.

Policy 5

Shade Streets. Facilitate the planting and maintenance of street trees, which provide shade and give scale to residential and commercial streets in all neighborhoods.

Policy 6

Sustainable Design. Develop design standards that promote sustainable development in public and private open space and street rights-of-way.

Policy 7

Partnerships. Encourage community and private partnerships in urban forestry issues, minimizing maintenance costs. Collaborate with other City departments, neighborhood associations, business improvement districts and private developers to promote trees in parkways, landscaped medians, community gateways, and throughout the community.

Diverse public spaces that provide pleasant places for neighbors to meet and congregate. Policy 1

Streetscape Guidelines. Develop and implement streetscape design guidelines that create walkable, pleasant environments.

Policy 2

Street Trees. Identify the placement of street trees as an important technique for stress- and crime-reduction.

“Greening” efforts to keep air and water clean are prioritized. Policy 1

Goal LU41.

Street Tree Canopy. Identify protecting and developing tree cover as a priority and encourage setting a target for street tree canopy cover in new developments and/or in areas identified as tree-deficient.

Ample opportunities exist for community gardens and urban farming. Policy 1

Community Gardens in Vacant Lots. Encourage the use of vacant lots for community gardens.

Policy 2

Inventory Potential Community Garden Sites. Identify and inventory potential community garden/urban farm sites within existing parks, public easements, rights-of-way and schoolyards, and prioritize site use as community gardens in appropriate locations.

DRAFT GOALS AND POLICIES FOR THE BOYLE HEIGHTS NEW COMMUNITY PLAN

(RELEASED 11/14/2014)

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