English  9  PLC  Best  Practices  for  CCSS  Anchor  Standards:  Vocabulary  

Contents   Academic  Vocabulary  List  ...........................................................................  2   http://wordsift.com/  ..................................................................................  3   The  Academic  Word  List  (AWL)  ...................................................................  4   AWL Selection  .................................................................................  4   Academic  Vocabulary  Highlighter  ...............................................................  5   File produced at level 8  ..........................................................................  5   Vocabulary  in  Context  .................................................................................  6   Vocabulary  in  Context:  Model  ....................................................................  7   Characteristics  of  effective  Vocabulary  Instruction  ....................................  8   READING  TASK  Graphic  Organizer  ..........................................................  10   Sage  -­‐N-­‐  Scribe  ........................................................................................  11    

     

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Academic  Vocabulary  List   http://www.englishcompanion.com/pdfDocs/acvocabulary2.pdf    

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http://wordsift.com/  

 

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The  Academic  Word  List  (AWL)   The Academic Word List (AWL) was developed by Averil Coxhead as her MA thesis at the School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. The list contains 570 word families which were selected according to principles. The list does not include words that are in the most frequent 2000 words of English. The AWL was primarily made so that it could be used by teachers as part of a programme preparing learners for tertiary level study or used by students working alone to learn the words most needed to study at tertiary institutions. The Academic Word List replaces the University Word List. For detail on the development and evaluation of the AWL, see Coxhead, Averil (2000) A New Academic Word List. TESOL Quarterly, 34(2): 213-238. AWL Selection Principles of Selection Used in Developing the AWL The word families of the Academic Word List were selected according to several principles. In order of importance, these selection principles were: 1. Range. The AWL families had to occur in the Arts, Commerce, Law and Science faculty sections of the Academic Corpus (see below for details on the Academic Corpus). The word families also had to occur in over half of the 28 subject areas of the Academic Corpus (see Table 2 below). Just over 94% of the words in the AWL occur in 20 or more subject areas. This principle ensures that the words in the AWL are useful for all learners, no matter what their area of study or what combination of subjects they take at tertiary level. 2. Frequency. The AWL families had to occur over 100 times in the 3,500,000 word Academic Corpus in order to be considered for inclusion in the list. This principle ensures that the words will be met a reasonable number of times in academic texts. 3. Uniformity of frequency. The AWL families had to occur a minimum of 10 times in each faculty of the Academic Corpus to be considered for inclusion in the list. This principle ensures that the vocabulary is useful for all learners. Words Excluded From the Academic Word List 1. Words occurring in the first 2,000 words of English. The AWL assumes knowledge of West's General Service List (GSL) (1953) as the basic vocabulary any learner should have before starting to learn academic vocabulary. 2. Narrow range words. Words which occurred in fewer than 4 faculty sections of the Academic Corpus or which occurred in fewer than 15 of the 28 subject areas of the Academic Corpus were excluded because they had narrow range. Technical or specialist words often have narrow range and were excluded on this basis 3. Proper nouns. The names of places, people, countries, for example, New Zealand, Jim Bolger and Wellington were excluded from the list. 4. Latin forms. Some of the most common Latin forms in the Academic Corpus were et al, etc, ie, and ibid.

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Academic  Vocabulary  Highlighter   http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/alzsh3/acvocab/awlhighlighter.htm  

  File produced at level 8 IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new

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Vocabulary  in  Context   Word  

SyllabicaZon    

Etymology  or  word   origin  

Other  form(s)  of  this  word/ derivaZons  

Part  of  speech  

DefinZon  of  word   (paraphrased)  

Prefixes,  Roots,   Suffixes  

Sentence  using  this  word  from   original  text.  

Here  is  my  own  original  sentence  using  this  word  in   context.    Annotate  your  "hints"  that  show  context.      

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Vocabulary  in  Context:  Model  

Word   Geography   SyllabicaZon    

Part  of  speech  

Ge/og/ra/phy  

Etymology  or  word   origin  

Noun  

DefinZon  of  word   (paraphrased)  

Geo:  Earth   Graphy:  To  write  

Drawing  land  masses  or  map   making.  

Other  form(s)  of  this  word/ derivaZons  

Prefixes,  Roots,  Suffixes  

geographical,  geographer  

prefix:  geo   root/base:  graph   suffix:  -­‐y  

Sentence  using  this  word  from   original  text.   "Historians  o`en  aaribute  tribal  conflicts  to  geographical  proximity."    

Here  is  my  own  original  sentence  using  this  word  in  context.     Annotate  your  "hints"  that  show  context.   In  my  world  geography  class  we  labeled  a  poliZcal  map  of  South  America.  

       

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Characteristics  of  effective  Vocabulary  Instruction      

 

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3  Sentence  Wrap-­‐Up  

Step  One:    Individual  work:   • Determine  what  is  most  important  in  relationship  to  what  we  studied  today  (use  your   materials)   • Sum  it  up  in  3  sentences  (no  more,  no  less)   ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ______  

 Step  Two:    Partner  work:   • Confer  with  your  partner   • Compare  your  individual  3  sentence  wrap-­‐ups  

• Clarify  any  concerns  and  revise  as  necessary  

Step  Three:    Make  it  global!   Create  a  fourth  sentence  (with  your  partner)  that  addresses  how  what  we’re  studying  is   connected  to  life...Begin  your  fourth  sentence  with  “This  is  important  because”…   ______________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________   Name  of  Text________________________________________________  

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READING TASK Graphic Organizer 1.Pre-­‐Reading  

2.During  Reading   3.Post  –Reading  

Skim/Scan  the  piece  for  the  title,  author/source,     and  date  of  publication.   Number  the  paragraphs.   Circle  or  highlight  the  parts  that  resonate  with  or   are  important  to  you.   Choose  1-­‐3  sentences  from  the  piece  that  you   think  would  benefit  the  “common  good”.     WRITING  TASK  

Step  1:    Copy  1-­‐3  sentences  from  the  piece:    (Choose  the  ones  that  “speak”  to  you)                   Step  2:    Write  the  sentences  in  your  own  words/Paraphrase  (remember  to  give  credit  to  the  author)                 Structured  Student  Interaction:   *Person  1:    Read  Steps  1-­‐2  out  loud  to  your  small  group.   *Each  person  in  the  group:    Comment  on  what  was  shared  (Person  who  shares  only  listens).   Step  3:    Explain  why  you  chose  these  specific  sentences  from  the  piece                 Structured  Student  Interaction:   *Person  1:    Read  Step  3  out  loud  to  your  small  group.     *Process  continues  with  the  next  person  in  the  small  group.    

 

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Sage -N- Scribe  

Sage:    The  speaker          

 

 

Scribe:    The  writer        

 

  1.  Choose  who  will  be  the  1st  Sage,  who  will  be  the  1st  Scribe.   2. Sage’s  role  is  to  share  his/her  ideas  with  the  Scribe  in  relationship  to  the  text   being  studied.    The  Sage  thanks  the  Scribe  once  he/she  is  done  sharing.   3. Scribe’s  role  is  to  write  down  what  the  Sage  shares.  The  Scribe  thanks  the   Sage  once  he/she  is  done  sharing.   4. SWITCH  roles.                        

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