Set-Valued Anal (2009) 17:195–201 DOI 10.1007/s11228-009-0110-7

An Answer to S. Simons’ Question on the Maximal Monotonicity of the Sum of a Maximal Monotone Linear Operator and a Normal Cone Operator Heinz H. Bauschke · Xianfu Wang · Liangjin Yao

Received: 6 February 2009 / Accepted: 8 April 2009 / Published online: 25 April 2009 © Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Abstract The question whether or not the sum of two maximal monotone operators is maximal monotone under Rockafellar’s constraint qualification—that is, whether or not “the sum theorem” is true—is the most famous open problem in Monotone Operator Theory. In his 2008 monograph “From Hahn-Banach to Monotonicity”, Stephen Simons asked whether or not the sum theorem holds for the special case of a maximal monotone linear operator and a normal cone operator of a closed convex set provided that the interior of the set makes a nonempty intersection with the domain of the linear operator. In this note, we provide an affirmative answer to Simons’ question. In fact, we show that the sum theorem is true for a maximal monotone linear relation and a normal cone operator. The proof relies on Rockafellar’s formula for the Fenchel conjugate of the sum as well as some results featuring the Fitzpatrick function. Keywords Constraint qualification · Convex function · Convex set · Fenchel conjugate · Fitzpatrick function · Linear relation · Linear operator · Maximal monotone operator · Multifunction · Monotone operator · Normal cone · Normal cone operator · Set-valued operator · Rockafellar’s sum theorem Mathematics Subject Classifications (2000) Primary 47A06 · 47H05; Secondary 47A05 · 47B65 · 49N15 · 52A41 · 90C25

H. H. Bauschke (B) · X. Wang · L. Yao Mathematics, Irving K. Barber School, UBC Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7, Canada e-mail: [email protected] X. Wang e-mail: [email protected] L. Yao e-mail: [email protected]

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1 Introduction Throughout this paper, we assume that X is a Banach space with norm  · , that X ∗ is its continuous dual space with norm  · ∗ , and that ·, · denotes the usual pairing between these spaces. Let A : X ⇒ X ∗ be a set-valued operator (also known from X to X ∗ , i.e., for every x ∈ X, Ax ⊆ X ∗ , and let gra A = as multifunction) ∗ ∗ (x, x ) ∈ X × X | x∗ ∈ Ax be the graph of A. Then A is said to be monotone if    ∀(x, x∗ ) ∈ gra A ∀(y, y∗ ) ∈ gra A

x − y, x∗ − y∗   0,

(1)

and maximal monotone if no proper enlargement (in the sense of graph inclusion) of A is monotone. Monotone operators have proven to be a key class of objects in modern Optimization and Analysis; see, e.g., the books [6, 10, 14–16, 19] and the references therein.   (We also adopt standard notation used in these books: dom A = x ∈ X | Ax = ∅ is the domain of A. Given a subset C of X, int C is the interior, C is the closure, bdry C is the boundary, and span C is the span (the set of all finite linear combinations) of C. The indicator function ιC of C takes the value 0 on C, and +∞ on X  C. Given f : X → ]−∞, +∞], dom f = f −1 (R) and f ∗ : X ∗ → [−∞, +∞] : x∗ → supx∈X(x, x∗  − f (x)) is the Fenchel conjugate of f . Furthermore, B X is the closed unit ball x ∈ X | x  1 of X, and N = {0, 1, 2, 3, . . .}.) Now assume that A is maximal monotone, and let B : X ⇒ X ∗ be maximal monotone as well. While the sum operator A + B : X ⇒ X ∗ : x → Ax + Bx =  ∗ a + b ∗ | a∗ ∈ Ax and b ∗ ∈ Bx is clearly monotone, it may fail to be maximal monotone. When X is reflexive, the classical constraint qualification dom A ∩ int dom B = ∅ guarantees maximal monotonicity of A + B, this is a famous result due to Rockafellar [13, Theorem 1]. Various extensions of this sum theorem have been found, but the general version in nonreflexive Banach spaces remains elusive— this has led to the famous sum problem; see Simons’ recent monograph [16] for the state-of-the-art. The notorious difficulty of the sum problem makes it tempting to consider various special cases. In this paper, we shall focus on the case when A is a linear relation and B is the normal cone operator NC of some nonempty closed convex subset C of X. (Recall that A is a linear relation if gra A is a linear subspace of X × X ∗ , that for every x ∈ X, the  normal cone operator at x is defined by NC (x) = and / C. Consult [7] for x∗ ∈ X ∗ | supC − x, x∗   0 , if x ∈ C; and NC (x) = ∅, if x ∈ further information on linear relations.) If A : X ⇒ X ∗ is at most single-valued (i.e., for every x ∈ X, either Ax = ∅ or Ax is a singleton), then we follow the common slight abuse of notation of identifying A with a classical operator dom A → X ∗ . We thus include the classical case when A : X → X ∗ is a continuous linear monotone (thus positive) operator. Continuous and discontinuous linear operators—and lately even linear relations—have received some attention in Monotone Operator Theory [1, 2, 4, 5, 11, 17, 18] because they provide additional classes of examples apart from the well known and well understood subdifferential operators in the sense of Convex Analysis. On page 199 in his monograph [16] from 2008, Stephen Simons asked the question whether or not A + NC is maximal monotone when A : dom A → X ∗ is linear and maximal monotone and Rockafellar’s constraint qualification dom A ∩ int C = ∅ holds. In this manuscript, we provide an affirmative answer to Simons’ question. In

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fact, maximality of A + NC is guaranteed even when A is a maximal monotone linear relation, i.e., A is simultaneously a maximal monotone operator and a linear relation. The paper is organized as follows. In Section 2, we collect auxiliary results for future reference and for the reader’s convenience. The main result (Theorem 3.1) is proved in Section 3. We conclude this section with some topological comments. If x ∈ X and x∗ ∈ ∗ X , then x, x∗  is the evaluation of the functional x∗ at the point x. We identify X with its canonical image in the bidual space X ∗∗ . Furthermore, X × X ∗ and (X × X ∗ )∗ = X ∗ × X ∗∗ are likewise paired via (x, x∗ ), (y∗ , y∗∗ ) = x, y∗  + x∗ , y∗∗ , where (x, x∗ ) ∈ X × X ∗ and (y∗ , y∗∗ ) ∈ X ∗ × X ∗∗ .

2 Auxiliary Results Fact 2.1 (Rockafellar) (See [12, Theorem 3(a)], [16, Corollary 10.3], or [19, Theorem 2.8.7(iii)].) Let f and g be proper convex functions from X to ]−∞, +∞]. Assume that there exists a point x0 ∈ dom f ∩ dom g such that g is continuous at x0 . Then for every z∗ ∈ X ∗ , there exists y∗ ∈ X ∗ such that ( f + g)∗ (z∗ ) = f ∗ (y∗ ) + g∗ (z∗ − y∗ ).

(2)

Fact 2.2 (Fitzpatrick) (See [8, Corollary 3.9].) Let A : X ⇒ X ∗ be maximal monotone, and set   F A: X × X ∗ → ]−∞, +∞] : (x, x∗ ) → sup x, a∗  + a, x∗  − a, a∗  , (3) (a,a∗ )∈gra A

which is the Fitzpatrick function associated with A. Then for every (x, x∗ ) ∈ X × X ∗ , the inequality x, x∗   F A (x, x∗ ) is true, and equality holds if and only if (x, x∗ ) ∈ gra A. Fact 2.3 (Simons) (See [16, Corollary 28.2].) Let A : X ⇒ X ∗ be maximal monotone. Then span(P X dom F A ) = span dom A,

(4)

where P X : X × X ∗ → X : (x, x∗ ) → x. Fact 2.4 (Simons) (See [16, Lemma 19.7 and Section 22].) Let A : X ⇒ X ∗ be a monotone linear relation such that gra A = ∅. Then the function g : X × X ∗ → ]−∞, +∞] : (x, x∗ ) → x, x∗  + ιgra A (x, x∗ )

(5)

is proper and convex. Proof We thank the referee for suggesting this simple proof, which we reproduce here in our current setting for the reader’s convenience. It is clear that g is proper because gra A = ∅. To see that g is convex, let (a, a∗ ) and (b , b ∗ ) be in gra A,

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and let λ ∈ ]0, 1[. Set μ = 1 − λ ∈ ]0, 1[ and observe that λ(a, a∗ ) + μ(b , b ∗ ) = (λa + μb , λa∗ + μb ∗ ) ∈ gra A by convexity of gra A. Since A is monotone, it follows that   λg(a, a∗ ) + μg(b , b ∗ ) − g λ(a, a∗ ) + μ(b , b ∗ ) = λa, a∗  + μb , b ∗  − −λa + μb , λa∗ + μb ∗  = λμa − b , a∗ − b ∗ 

 0.

(6)  

Therefore, g is convex.

Lemma 2.5 Let C be a nonempty closed convex subset of X such that int C = ∅. Let c0 ∈ int C and suppose that z ∈ X  C. Then there exists λ ∈ ]0, 1[ such that λc0 + (1 − λ)z ∈ bdry C.   Proof Let λ = inf t ∈ [0, 1] | tc0 + (1 − t)z ∈ C . Since C is closed,   λ = min t ∈ [0, 1] | tc0 + (1 − t)z ∈ C .

(7)

Because z ∈ / C, λ > 0. We now show that λc0 + (1 − λ)z ∈ bdry C. Assume to the contrary that λc0 + (1 − λ)z ∈ int C. Then there exists δ ∈ ]0, λ[ such that λc0 + (1 − λ)z − δ(c0 − z) ∈ C. Hence (λ − δ)c0 + (1 − λ + δ)z ∈ C, which contradicts Eq. 7. Therefore, λc0 + (1 − λ)z ∈ bdry C. Since c0 ∈ / bdry C, we also have λ < 1.   The following useful result is a variant of [3, Theorem 2.14]. Lemma 2.6 Let A : X ⇒ X ∗ be a set-valued operator, let C be a nonempty closed convex subset of X, and let (z, z∗ ) ∈ X × X ∗ . Set  {0}, if x ∈ C; IC : X ⇒ X ∗ : x → (8) ∅, otherwise. Then (z, z∗ ) is monotonically related to gra(A + NC ) if and only if  (z, z∗ ) is monotonically related to gra(A + IC ) and z ∈

  a + TC (a) ,

a∈(dom A)∩C





where (∀a ∈ C) TC (a) = x ∈ X | supx, NC (a)  0 .

(9)

Proof “⇒”: Since gra IC ⊆ gra NC , it follows that gra(A + IC ) ⊆ gra(A + NC ); consequently, (z, z∗ ) is monotonically related to gra(A + IC ). Now assume that a ∈ dom A ∩ C, and let a∗ ∈ Aa. Then (a, a∗ + NC (a)) ⊆ gra(A + NC ) and hence inf a − z, a∗ + NC (a) − z∗   0. This implies +∞ > a − z, a∗ − z∗   sup z − a, NC (a). Since NC (a) is a cone, it follows that sup z − a, NC (a)  0 and hence z ∈ a + TC (a). “⇐”: Assume that a ∈ dom A ∩ C. Then Aa = (A + IC )a, which yields sup z − a, Aa − z∗   0, and also z − a ∈ TC (a), i.e., sup z − a, NC (a)  0. Adding the last two inequalities, we obtain sup z − a, Aa + NC (a) − z∗   0, i.e., inf a − z, (A + NC )(a) − z∗   0, as required.  

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3 Main Result Theorem 3.1 Let A : X ⇒ X ∗ be a maximal monotone linear relation, let C be a nonempty closed convex subset of X, and suppose that dom A ∩ int C = ∅. Then A + NC is maximal monotone. Proof Let (z, z∗ ) ∈ X × X ∗ and suppose that (z, z∗ ) is monotonically related to gra(A + NC ).

(10)

It suffices to show that (z, z∗ ) ∈ gra(A + NC ).

(11)

g : X × X ∗ → ]−∞, +∞] : (x, x∗ ) → x, x∗  + ιgra A (x, x∗ ).

(12)

Set

By Fact 2.4, g is convex. Hence, h = g + ιC×X ∗

(13)

c0 ∈ dom A ∩ int C,

(14)

is convex as well. Let

and let c∗0 ∈ Ac0 . Then (c0 , c∗0 ) ∈ gra A ∩ (int C × X ∗ ) = dom g ∩ int dom ιC×X ∗ , and ιC×X ∗ is continuous at (c0 , c∗0 ). By Fact 2.1 (applied to g and ιC×X ∗ ), there exists (y∗ , y∗∗ ) ∈ X ∗ × X ∗∗ such that ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗∗ ) h∗ (z∗ , z) = g∗ (y∗ , y∗∗ ) + ιC×X ∗ (z − y , z − y ∗ (z∗ − y∗ ) + ι{0} (z − y∗∗ ). = g∗ (y∗ , y∗∗ ) + ιC

(15)

Let (x, x∗ ) ∈ dom h = gra A ∩ (C× X ∗ ). Then x∗ +0 ∈ (A + NC )x and hence (x, x∗ ) ∈ gra(A + NC ). In view of Eq. 10, x − z, x∗ − z∗   0, from which (x, x∗ ), (z∗ , z) − h(x, x∗ ) = x, z∗  + z, x∗  − x, x∗   z, z∗ . Consequently, h∗ (z∗ , z)  z, z∗ .

(16)

Combining Eq. 15 with Eq. 16, we obtain ∗ g∗ (y∗ , y∗∗ ) + ιC (z∗ − y∗ ) + ι{0} (z − y∗∗ )  z, z∗ .

(17)

∗ (z∗ − y∗ )  z, z∗ . Since g∗ (y∗ , z) = F A (z, y∗ ), Therefore, y∗∗ = z and g∗ (y∗ , z) + ιC ∗ we deduce that F A (z, y∗ ) + ιC (z∗ − y∗ )  z, z∗ ; equivalently,

(∀c ∈ C)

F A (z, y∗ ) − z, y∗  + c − z, z∗ − y∗   0.

(18)

We now claim that z ∈ C.

(19)

Assume to the contrary that Eq. 19 fails, i.e., that z ∈ / C. By Eq. 18, (z, y∗ ) ∈ dom F A . Using Fact 2.3 and the fact that dom A is a linear subspace of X, we see that z ∈ P X (dom F A ) ⊆ span P X (dom F A ) = span dom A = dom A. Hence there exists a

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sequence (zn )n∈N in (dom A)  C such that zn → z. By Lemma 2.5, (∀n ∈ N) (∃λn ∈ ]0, 1[ ) λn zn + (1 − λn )c0 ∈ bdry C. Thus, (∀n ∈ N) λn zn + (1 − λn )c0 ∈ dom A ∩ bdry C.

(20)

After passing to a subsequence and relabeling if necessary, we assume that λn → λ ∈ [0, 1]. Taking the limit in Eq. 20, we deduce that λz + (1 − λ)c0 ∈ bdry C. Since c0 ∈ int C and z ∈ X  C, we have 0 < λ and λ < 1. Hence λn → λ ∈ ]0, 1[ .

(21)

Since int C = ∅, Mazur’s Separation Theorem (see, e.g., [9, Theorem 2.2.19]) yields a sequence (c∗n )n∈N in X ∗ such that   (∀n ∈ N) c∗n ∈ NC λn zn + (1 − λn )c0 and c∗n ∗ = 1. (22) Since c0 ∈ int C, there exists δ > 0 such that c0 + δ B X ⊆ C. It follows that (∀n ∈ N) δ  λn zn − c0 , c∗n .

(23)

Since the sequence (c∗n )n∈N is bounded, we pass to a w* (c∗γ )γ ∈ , say c∗γ  c∗ ∈ X ∗ . Passing to the limit in Eq. 23 δ  λz − c0 , c∗ ; hence, using Eq. 21,

weak* convergent subnet along subnets, we see that

0 < z − c0 , c∗ .

(24)

On the other hand and borrowing the notation of Lemma 2.6, we deduce from Eq. 20, Eq. 10, and Lemma 2.6 that (∀n ∈ N) z ∈ (Id +TC )(λn zn + (1 − λn )c0 ), which in view of Eq. 22 yields (∀n ∈ N) z − (λn zn + (1 − λn )c0 ), c∗n   0.

(25) ∗

Taking limits in Eq. 25 along subnets, we deduce z − (λz + (1 − λ)c0 ), c   0. Dividing by 1 − λ and recalling Eq. 21, we thus have z − c0 , c∗   0.

(26)

Considered together, the inequalities (24) and (26) are absurd—we have thus verified Eq. 19. Substituting Eq. 19 into Eq. 18, we deduce that F A (z, y∗ )  z, y∗ .

(27)

(z, y∗ ) ∈ gra A

(28)

By Fact 2.2,

and F A (z, y∗ ) = z, y∗ . Thus, using Eq. 18 again, we see that supc∈C c − z, z∗ − y∗   0, i.e., that (z, z∗ − y∗ ) ∈ gra NC . Adding Eqs. 28 and 29, we obtain Eq. 11, and this completes the proof.

(29)  

Corollary 3.2 Let A : X ⇒ X ∗ be maximal monotone and at most single-valued, and let C be a nonempty closed convex subset of X. Suppose that A|dom A is linear, and that dom A ∩ int C = ∅. Then A + NC is maximal monotone.

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Remark 3.3 Corollary 3.2 provides an affirmative answer to a question Stephen Simons raised in his 2008 monograph [16, page 199] concerning [15, Theorem 41.6]. Acknowledgements We are indebted to the referee for his/her insightful and pertinent comments. Heinz Bauschke was partially supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and by the Canada Research Chair Program. Xianfu Wang was partially supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

References 1. Bauschke, H.H., Borwein, J.M.: Maximal monotonicity of dense type, local maximal monotonicity, and monotonicity of the conjugate are all the same for continuous linear operators. Pac. J. Math. 189, 1–20 (1999) 2. Bauschke, H.H., Borwein, J.M., Wang, X.: Fitzpatrick functions and continuous linear monotone operators. SIAM J. Optim. 18, 789–809 (2007) 3. Bauschke, H.H., Wang, X.: An explicit example of a maximal 3-cyclically monotone operator with bizarre properties. Nonlinear Anal. 69, 2875–2891 (2008) 4. Bauschke, H.H., Wang, X., Yao, L.: Autoconjugate representers for linear monotone operators. Math. Program. (Series B). http://arxiv.org/abs/0802.1375v1 (2008, preprint) 5. Bauschke, H.H., Wang, X., Yao, L.: Monotone linear relations: maximality and Fitzpatrick functions. J. Convex Anal. 16(4). http://arxiv.org/abs/0805.4256v1 (2009) 6. Burachik, R.S., Iusem, A.N.: Set-Valued Mappings and Enlargements of Monotone Operators. Springer, New York (2008) 7. Cross, R.: Multivalued Linear Operators. Marcel Dekker, New York (1998) 8. Fitzpatrick, S.: Representing monotone operators by convex functions. In: Workshop/ Miniconference on Functional Analysis and Optimization (Canberra 1988). Proceedings of the Centre for Mathematical Analysis, Australian National University, vol. 20, pp. 59–65. Australian National University, Canberra (1988) 9. Megginson, R.E.: An Introduction to Banach Space Theory. Springer, New York (1998) 10. Phelps, R.R.: Convex functions, Monotone Operators and Differentiability, 2nd edn. Springer, New York (1993) 11. Phelps, R.R., Simons, S.: Unbounded linear monotone operators on nonreflexive Banach spaces. J. Convex Anal. 5, 303–328 (1998) 12. Rockafellar, R.T.: Extension of Fenchel’s duality theorem for convex functions. Duke Math. J. 33, 81–89 (1966) 13. Rockafellar, R.T.: On the maximality of sums of nonlinear monotone operators. Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 149, 75–88 (1970) 14. Rockafellar, R.T., Wets, R.J-B.: Variational Analysis, 2nd printing. Springer, New York (2004) 15. Simons, S.: Minimax and Monotonicity. Springer, New York (1998) 16. Simons, S.: From Hahn-Banach to Monotonicity. Springer, New York (2008) 17. Svaiter, B.F.: Non-enlargeable operators and self-cancelling operators. http://arxiv.org/abs/0807. 1090v1 (2008) ˘ 18. Voisei, M.D., Zalinescu, C.: Linear monotone subspaces of locally convex spaces. http://arxiv. org/abs/0809.5287v1 (2008) ˘ 19. Zalinescu, C.: Convex Analysis in General Vector Spaces. World Scientific, Singapore (2002)

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Apr 25, 2009 - In this note, we provide an affirmative answer to Simons' question. In fact, we show that the sum theorem is true for a maximal monotone.

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