Activity Pack 3: Share and Collaborate Activity for Grades 9-12 George Lucas, the creative genius behind some of the greatest movies of our time, once said that “a special effect without a story is a pretty boring thing.” In fact, the communication phase of the creative process – presenting and sharing collaborative feedback -- may be the most important. This is the time where creators learn whether their work has the intended effect and, if not, what they can do to improve it. The sharing stage of the process often leads to reimagining and recreating as new ideas and inspirations are formed. For the animated movie Snow White, as many as two million sketches and paintings were created, though only about 166,000 of them were used in the finished film. Drawings for the seven dwarfs alone took more than two years! In this activity, students compete in a Doodle Off and learn effective strategies for explaining their creations and critiquing the creations of others. They learn to incorporate knowledge, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and suggestions in their peer critique and apply those strategies to critique the doodles of two classmates in a doodle exhibit. Finally, they incorporate critique from others to improve their own doodles.

Exhibit D In this activity, students will learn the importance of sharing and collaborating as a part of the creative process. They will apply what they learn to provide thoughtful feedback about two doodles in a class doodle exhibit. Strategy: In this activity, students are introduced to peer critique. They learn how to use description, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and specific suggestions to help classmates improve their doodles. You Will Need: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Two flipcharts Stopwatch or other timing device Markers, crayons, colored pencils, or paints “Exhibit D” handout (one per student) Tape Several index cards Two sets of numbers on paper that correspond with the number of doodles students have created Large container or fishbowl Computers (optional) Access to the Internet (optional) © 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

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Before class, set up two flip charts in front of the room and create two numbered sets of index cards that correspond to the number of students in the class. Fold the index cards and place them in a large container. 1. As students enter, ask for two volunteers who would like to participate in a Doodle Off! Explain that Google doodlers often conduct timed drawing competitions, to see whose vision best answers a particular question or challenge. 2. Invite each participant to stand by one of the flipcharts. Note that you could also include a digital drawing application as an option for one or more of the participants rather than the flipcharts. 3. Explain the rules. You will read a question or challenge. Students will have three minutes to doodle how they would answer or interpret the challenge. They must incorporate the word “Google” in their doodle. Ensure that students have all of the art materials they need. Set the timer for three minutes. Note: If students prefer, allow them to get help from one or two classmates as they create their doodles. Then, read one of the following challenges to students: 

Thank you for participating in this Doodle Off! You will have three minutes to illustrate a doodle to show the world why our school is so special. You must incorporate the word “Google” in the doodle. Ready. Set. Go!



Thank you for participating in this Doodle Off! You will have three minutes to illustrate your doodle. Here is your challenge. Create a doodle that shows what it’s like to be a teen in 2014. You must incorporate the word “Google” in the doodle. Ready. Set. Go!

4. After three minutes, say, “Stop.” Ask each doodler to put down his or her art materials. Explain to students that the next step in the Doodle Off is for each doodler to explain his or her doodle including what they drew, why they drew it, how they drew it, what artistic choices they made, and why. Give each doodler an opportunity to explain his or her doodle to the class. 5. Explain that the final stage in the Doodle Off is typically to name a winner, but often feedback is given first to help the doodlers understand what their peers liked about the doodles and what suggestions they might have for improvement. Invite a few students to share what they liked about the doodles and/or what they would suggest the doodlers do to help make their drawings better. 6. Ask each student to secretly vote for the doodle they think best addressed the challenge or question. Proclaim the winner! Ask students to share what they learned from this exercise and why they think Doodle Offs are a part of the creative process at Google.

© 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

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7. Talk with students about the importance of peer critique in the creative process. Explain that the creative process is rarely one in which the first creation of something is the final version. We often need to tinker with and improve upon our creations before we consider them complete. Yet, it’s often difficult to know what to improve in our own creations. Feedback from others can help us see what works and what doesn’t. 8. Share with students that they are going to have an opportunity to learn how they can effectively provide constructive peer review by describing, analyzing, interpreting, evaluating, and making suggestions for the doodles of their classmates. 9. Invite students to get out the doodles they created in the “Your Move” activity in the Create activity pack. Distribute an index card to each student. Challenge students to write a description on the index card that explains their doodles. Their explanation should include what they would invent to make the world a better place, how their doodle represents this, why they made the artistic choices they did, and what they hope their doodle inspires in those who view it. They should not write their names on these cards. 10. Explain to students that all of the doodles and corresponding index cards will be displayed in the room like an exhibition. Each doodle will have a number. Each student will randomly select two numbers that have been placed in a large container. Those two numbers will correspond to the doodles for which they will provide peer review. 11. Hang numbered doodles and index cards around the room. Place blank index cards and markers by each doodle in the exhibit. 12. Distribute the “Exhibit D” handout. Explain to students that effective peer review has five elements: description, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and suggestions. Review the questions and prompts under each element in the handout and ensure that students understand each. You may want to challenge students to answer some of these questions for the doodles in the introductory activity. 13. Invite each student to select two numbers from the container. Direct them to stand by one of the doodles to which they have been assigned. Invite them to read the artist’s explanation and to then provide thoughtful written critique on one of the blank index cards. Their critique should include comments related to each of the five elements of peer review. Have students repeat the process for their second doodle. 14. Once each student has reviewed two doodles, invite students to collect their own doodles and review cards. Ask students how this exercise can be helpful in their creative process. 15. Finally, give students ample time, in class or at home, to tinker with and finalize the doodles they will submit for the Doodle 4 Google competition. Remember that they must illustrate what © 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

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they would invent to make the world a better place, incorporate the word Google, and follow all competition rules. Take It Digital! In today’s virtual world, collaboration and feedback on design projects often takes place in cyberspace. Red Pen (https://redpen.io/) is a way to get fast feedback on a design project. Users upload their design, share a short URL and get live, annotated feedback. Data is safe and secure, and will never be shared. Once uploaded, just click anywhere on your design to add a note. You can then share your unique URL, and insert the email address to which you would like replies to be sent. When you revisit Red Pen, the site remembers your previous uploads and presents their links.

© 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

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Exhibit D Thoughtful and constructive critique from others is an important part of the creative process. In this activity, you will critique an anonymous classmate’s doodle. As you write and present your feedback, consider the questions below. Be prepared to answer at least one or two of the questions under each element in your review. Describe: Strictly what you see. No judgment ● What do you think the artist wants to do to make the world better? ● How did the artist represent this action? ● What are your first impressions? What stands out to you? ● What objects or actions do you see in the doodle? ● What colors and shapes are used? ● Is there one central element that draws your eyes toward it or many smaller elements on which to focus? Analyze: How the artist’s choices create the overall impression of the artwork ● Why do you think the artist chose to include the illustrations he or she did? ● What artistic choices did the artist make? ● What shapes, forms, and lines did the artist choose and why? ● What shading choices did the author make and why? ● What mood does the doodle evoke? ● How do the technical elements contribute to the mood? Interpret: Apply your own theories about the author’s purpose and choices ● What is the artist trying to say in the doodle? ● Why do you think the artist is trying to say this? ● Why do you think the artist made the artistic choices he or she did? Evaluate: Draw conclusions and reach judgments. ● What stands out to you as the most important part of the doodle, and why? ● What elements of the doodle do you think work the best? ● Do you think the artist was successful in communicating his or her vision? If so, why? If not, what could he or she have done differently? Suggest: Make specific suggestions for how the artist could improve their work ● What is a specific suggestion for how the author could make the doodle more effective? This could be color choice, objects used, where objects are placed, use of the word, “Google,” etc. ● How could the artist implement this suggestion?

© 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

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Activity Pack 3: Share and Collaborate Activity for Grades 9 ...

the intended effect and, if not, what they can do to improve it. ... Snow White, as many as two million sketches and paintings were created, though only about 166,000 of .... Once each student has reviewed two doodles, invite students to collect their own doodles and ... share a short URL and get live, annotated feedback.

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