Activity Pack 3: Share and Collaborate

Activity for Grades 6-8 George Lucas, the creative genius behind some of the greatest movies of our time, once said that “a special effect without a story is a pretty boring thing.” In fact, the communication phase of the creative process – presenting and sharing collaborative feedback -- may be the most important. This is the time where creators learn whether their work has the intended effect and, if not, what they can do to improve it. The sharing stage of the process often leads to reimagining and recreating as new ideas and inspirations are formed. For the animated movie Snow White, as many as two million sketches and paintings were created, though only about 166,000 of them were used in the finished film. Drawings for the seven dwarfs alone took more than two years! In this activity, students are introduced to the importance of peer review and critique as part of the creative process. They learn how to apply description, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and suggestion in the peer review process. They then apply those strategies to review an anonymous classmates’ doodle. Finally, they use critique from others to improve their own doodle.

Sincerely, Anonymous In this activity, students learn how to thoughtfully critique a classmate’s artwork and then apply critique from others to make their doodle better. Strategy: In this activity, students are introduced to anonymous critique as a strategy for providing constructive feedback to peers. With anonymous critique, students are unaware whose artwork they are reviewing. This often allows them to provide more honest feedback as they concentrate more on the artwork than the artist. You Will Need: ● ● ● ● ●

An image of a painting, sculpture, doodle, or other artwork Index cards “Sincerely, Anonymous” handout (one for each student) Computers (optional) Access to the Internet (optional)

Note: Before class begins, collect the doodles students created in the “Flip Out” activity from the Create activity pack. Make sure that students’ names are not included or that they are covered so that each artist will be anonymous for this activity. © 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

1

1. Distribute an index card to each student. Tell them not to write their names on the cards. Ask students to imagine that they have been asked to critique a piece of art for an upcoming art exhibit. 2. Show students the image you have selected (see materials list). You may want to allow students to pass the image around or to walk up to the computer to see the image more closely. 3. Invite students to provide their critique on their index card. They can write whatever they want. When they have finished, collect the cards. 4. Write the words, “describe,” “analyze,” “interpret,” “evaluate,” and “suggest” on the board. You may need to share the following definitions:  Describe: Share what you see in the artwork.  Analyze: Describe an in-depth analysis of how technical elements were used by the artist.  Interpret: Identify what you think the artist is trying to say or communicate.  Evaluate: Identify what you liked and what you think did not work as well.  Suggest: Provide specific suggestions for how the artwork could be improved. 5. One at a time, read the index cards students completed. After each card is read, ask students if they think the reviewer was describing, analyzing, interpreting, evaluating, or suggesting changes in the artwork, or if it was a combination. 6. Explain to students that while their first instinct may have been to simply describe the artwork or say what they liked or didn’t like, effective critique combines all of the elements listed above. 7. Talk with students about the importance of peer critique in the creative process. Explain that the creative process is rarely one in which the first creation of something is the final version. At Google, for example, doodlers present their ideas and sketches to a team of other doodlers who share ideas and feedback to make the doodle the best it can be. The doodler then goes back and tinkers with the doodle, incorporating the constructive feedback of others. Ask students what they think the value is of constructive feedback from their peers. 8. Share with students that they are going to have an opportunity to learn how they can effectively provide constructive peer review by describing, analyzing, interpreting, evaluating, and making suggestions for the practice doodle their classmate made in the “Flip Out” activity in the Create activity pack. 9. Distribute the “Sincerely, Anonymous” handout. Go over all five elements of the review. Explain to students that they will be completing an anonymous peer analysis of each other’s doodles, meaning they won’t know whose doodle they are reviewing. This way they will concentrate on © 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

2

the doodle rather than on the artist who drew it. 10. Randomly distribute a doodle to each student making sure that students do not receive their own doodle to review. Give students ample time to study the doodle and provide thoughtful critique on the handout. 11. Invite students to sit in a circle in their chairs. One at a time, invite students to hold up the doodles they reviewed and share their peer critique. Assign the student on the presenter’s left the task of making sure the presenter covers all of the critique elements. 12. After each student has presented his or her critique, invite one or two other students to share elements they liked, questions they might have, or suggestions they have for improvement. 13. Continue around the circle until all peer reviews have been shared. 14. When reviews are finished, ask students to discuss the process. What was most helpful for them about the process? What was most challenging? Did they feel they received constructive and thoughtful feedback about their own doodle that will help them make it better? What, if anything, would have made the process more helpful for them? 15. Remind students that the creative process is ongoing. With that in mind, collect all doodles and invite students to take back their own. Give students time, in class or at home, to tinker with and finalize the doodle they will submit for the Doodle 4 Google competition. Remember that they must illustrate how they would make the world better, incorporate the word “Google,” and follow all competition rules. Take It Digital! VoiceThread (www.voicethread.com) is an electronic application that transforms media into collaborative spaces. Students (and teachers) can digitally present and share information about visuals and other media. They first upload a picture or video and then record their voices telling its story. Text options are also available. Other students can then offer feedback using video, voice, text and/or doodle! Feedback can be layered to provide rich digital interaction and new ways to share, present, and collaborate.

© 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

3

Sincerely, Anonymous Thoughtful and constructive critique from others is an important part of the creative process. In this activity, you will critique an anonymous classmate’s doodle. As you write and present your feedback, consider the prompts below. Include at least one comment related to each step in the critique process. 1. Describe the doodle. Include only what you see in the doodle with no judgments. This can include your first impressions. 2. Analyze the artist’s choices: Explain how the artist’s choices create your overall impression of the artwork. These choices can include illustrations, shapes, forms, lines and shading. 3. Interpret the artist’s choices. Consider what you think the artist is trying to say and why he or she made specific choices to say it. 4. Evaluate the doodle. Share what you think is most important, what you like the most or what works best, and what the artist could have done differently. 5. Suggest thoughtful adjustments to the doodle: Make one or two specific suggestions for how the artist could improve the doodle.

© 2014 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc.

4

Activity for Grades 6-8

With anonymous critique, students are unaware whose artwork they .... the artwork. These choices can include illustrations, shapes, forms, lines and shading. 3.

365KB Sizes 0 Downloads 138 Views

Recommend Documents

Activity for Grades 6-8
This is the time where creators learn whether their work has ... White, as many as two million sketches and paintings were created, though only about 166,000 of.

Activity Pack 1: Imagine Activity for Grades 3-5
This year's Doodle 4 Google competition theme is: If I could invent one thing to .... You may want to add time during later rounds so that students have time to.

Activity Pack 2: Create Activity for Grades 6-8 Flip Out .com.sg
make out of it. ... activity, students will draw, sketch, paint, or animate their ideas for making the world .... Animation Desk: app for creating short, animated videos.

Activity Pack 3: Share and Collaborate Activity for Grades 3-5 ...
Several sets of index cards with the following critique starters written on them: I know _____; ... eyes, it can often help to make our creations the best they can be.

Activity Pack 3: Share and Collaborate Activity for Grades 9 ...
the intended effect and, if not, what they can do to improve it. ... Snow White, as many as two million sketches and paintings were created, though only about 166,000 of .... Once each student has reviewed two doodles, invite students to collect thei

Activity Pack 2: Create Activity for Grades 9-12 It's Your ... .ch
activity, students will draw, sketch, paint, or animate their ideas for making the .... how their ball looks as the movement begins (with a person or people in the illustration if they ... In the free version of the app you can create up to 50 scenes

Activity Pack 2: Create Activity for Grades K-2 High Five .de
This year's Doodle 4 Google competition theme is: If I could invent one thing to make the world a better place ... The five shapes include a circle, square, triangle,.

Activity Pack 3: Share and Collaborate Activity For Grades K ...
In this activity, students learn how the acronym TAG can help them provide thoughtful ... Computers (optional) ... The other will try to draw the object without help.

Activity Pack 2: Create Activity for Grades K-2 High Five .de
This year's Doodle 4 Google competition theme is: If I could invent one thing to make the world a better place. ... turn it into something else, or add other shapes.

Activity Pack 3: Share and Collaborate Activity for Grades 9 ...
Ensure that students have all of the art materials they need. Set the timer for three minutes. Note: If students prefer, allow them to get help from one or two.

68.pdf
Page 1 of 2. Areacode Sub-District Kalolsavam 2015-16 ... 1 701 - Upanyasam - Arabic MURSHDA KP C 1. 2 703 - Caption ... Main menu. Displaying 68.pdf.

[PDF] The Science Teacher's Activity-A-Day, Grades 5-10
education standards These quick warm-up lessons can help students link familiar ... School Improvement Specialist, Metropolitan Regional Educational.

68.pdf
Such post acceptance ... In an environment of uncertainty, the beginning of the exchanges tends to focus on the engineering and economic ... Since scarce resources are to be deployed, efforts at project organizing are ... Displaying 68.pdf.

RS-68.pdf
There was a problem previewing this document. Retrying... Download. Connect more apps... Try one of the apps below to open or edit this item. Main menu.