Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

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Mechanism and Machine Theory journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/mechmachtheory

Research paper

A 3-DOF quick-action parallel manipulator based on four linkage mechanisms with high-speed cam Jing Wu a, Rui-Jun Yan a,∗, Kyoo-Sik Shin b, Chang-Soo Han b, I-Ming Chen a a b

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, (639798), Singapore Department of Robot Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, (426791), Republic of Korea

a r t i c l e

i n f o

Article history: Received 15 March 2017 Accepted 20 April 2017

Keywords: High-speed cam Linkage mechanism Quick-action 3-DOF parallel manipulator

a b s t r a c t Quick-action mechanisms are always favoured in industrial applications because of its high efficiency. To pursue the high stiffness, low inertia and large payload capacity of the quickaction mechanism, this paper proposes a 1T2R 3-DOF quick-action parallel manipulator, which is developed based on four linkage mechanisms with high-speed cam. The cam is designed by using a 7th degree polynomial curve having high-speed motion. Based on this cam, a quick action linkage mechanism is proposed to realize a fast-out and a slow-back motion. Then kinematics and static forces of this linkage mechanism during the motions are analyzed, and its corresponding dynamics model is constructed. By arranging four linkage mechanisms in a way of quadrantal symmetry, a quick action parallel manipulator is capable of realizing three types of movements. Position and first-order kinematics of this manipulator are analyzed to illustrate its motion characteristics. Finally, the quick action linkage mechanism is validated by simulating a fixed trajectory of the end-effector in both two phases, and the parallel manipulator is validated by showing the simulation results of its output actions and the joint parameters during the movements. These analysis and validations show that both the proposed linkage mechanism and the 1T2R parallel manipulator have quite a few potential applications to enhance production efficiency and save energy. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1. Introduction In industrial applications, quick-action mechanisms are always favoured because of its high production efficiency. However, serial quick-action mechanism has the drawbacks of low stiffness and small payload capacity. To overcome these drawbacks, parallel manipulators have been an intensive area of research for over two decades. Its applications staring from simple pick-and-place operations in industrial robots to advanced electronic manufacturing, maintenance of nuclear plants and space robotics [1–5]. Currently, parallel manipulators with different degree of freedom (DOF) have been developed, 2-DOF [6,7], 3-DOF [8,9], 4-DOF [10,11], 6-DOF [12,13], etc. Comparing with higher DOF, manipulators with lower DOF are cheap and easily developed accompanying with extensive applications. Especially for 3-DOF parallel manipulators, it has four classifications by combining rotation (R) and translation (T) , such as 1R2T types, 2R1T types, 3R types and 3T types.



Corresponding author. E-mail addresses: [email protected] (J. Wu), [email protected] (R.-J. Yan), [email protected] (K.-S. Shin), [email protected] (C.-S. Han), [email protected] (I.-M. Chen). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mechmachtheory.2017.04.012 0094-114X/© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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This paper focus on the spatial 3-DOF parallel manipulator belonging to 1T2R type having been extensively developed and analyzed. Yoon and Ryu [14] developed a 1T2R 3DOF parallel manipulator as a locomotion interface allowing human walking on various virtual terrains. Chung et al. [15] proposed a foldable 1T2R mechanism with an asymmetric chain structure, which was designed for a flat-panel TV mounting system. Li et al. [16] designed and kinematically analyzed a spatial 2-RPU&SPR manipulator with 1T2R type. Xie et al. [17] introduced a systematic type synthesis method for 1T2R manipulator, and discussed its typical application in five-axis machine tools. Fan et al. [18] presented a method for the type synthesis of 1T2R parallel manipulator based on the integration of configuration evolution and Lie group theory. Li and Herve [19] obtained over-constrained 1T2R manipulators without parasitic motion by removing the idle pairs in the non-over-constrained manipulators. Chen et al. [20] proposed a 1T2R symmetrical parallel manipulator realizing continuous motion with no parasitic motion. None of these research about 1T2R parallel manipulator have been done to realize high-speed or quick-action having relatively higher speed than the speed of only using motors. However, quick-action parallel manipulators are always needed in industrial development to improve the efficiency of production. Realization of quick-action parallel manipulators has attracted the attention of many researchers. Kang et al. [21] proposed planar parallel mechanism which can achieve rapid motion due to the low inertia of its moving parts and the use of multiple simultaneous specification control. He also developed a two-time scale dynamic model of a 3-DOF planar parallel manipulator with structurally flexible linkages [22]. Piras et al. [23] presented results of a dynamic finite element analysis of a planar fully parallel robot with flexible links. Li et al. [24] introduced a 2-DOF high speed and high precision planar parallel manipulator consisting of a moving platform that is connected to a fixed base by two limbs. Shang and Cong [25] proposed a computed torque (CT)-type controller for quick action planar parallel manipulator to replace the linear PD in the conventional CT controller with nonlinear PD algorithm. Chen et al. [26] presented an efficient dynamic modeling approach for planar parallel manipulator with flexible links to increase the accuracy of model by using an improved curvature-based finite element method. These research related with quick-action have been done by improving the control method for planar parallel manipulator. Nevertheless, realizing quick-action for parallel manipulator, especial spatial parallel manipulator, by improving mechanical design is crucial to the whole development of manipulators. In this paper, a 3-DOF quick-action parallel manipulator with 1T2R type is developed based on a closed-loop quick-action linkage mechanism with a special cam. Initially, a quick-action linkage mechanism with a high-speed cam is presented. The high-speed cam is designed by using a 7th degree polynomial curve, and optimized by using a Non-Uniform Rational Bsplines (NURBS) curve. The length of all the links of the linkage mechanism are predefined, and the range of link parameters are decided based on these lengths. To draw the workspace of this linkage system, kinematics analysis and force analysis are proceeded. With the properties of the quick-action, the applications of the proposed linkage mechanism are discussed. The proposed quick-action parallel manipulator is composed of four linkage mechanisms holding the property of quadrantal symmetry. To realize 1T2R types of movements, an output platform with two perpendicular grooves having an intersection point in each quadrant is designed. When the manipulator moves along Z direction, four chains simultaneous move without sliding in the grooves. When the manipulator rotates along X or Y axis, two adjacent chains move along Z direction, and two others remain stationary. There are two movement phases of this quick-action parallel manipulator, a fast-out phase and a slow-back phase. Joint values during the movements of these three types of movements are plotted to show the different movements of four linkage mechanisms. Similarly, position analysis, kinematic analysis and applications of this 3-DOF parallel manipulator are discussed. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. In Section 2, design, analysis, and optimization of high-speed cam is presented. A close-loop quick-action linkage mechanism based on cam is proposed in Section 3. In Section 4, a 1T2R spatial parallel manipulator is developed, and the link parameters, velocity, and forces of all the four chains are analyzed during the movements. The simulation results of high-speed cam, quick-action linkage system, and proposed parallel manipulator are shown in Section 5. Finally, this paper is concluded in Section 6. 2. High-speed cam 2.1. Cam design Generally, the profile and property of a cam depends on a curved outline. By comparing with the sine curve, cosine curve, and polynomial curve [27], the characteristics of polynomial curve could be an appropriate curve for its application in high-speed and medium-load conditions. In this proposed high-speed cam, a 7th degree polynomial curve in the rise phase and a line in the return phase are used to close the contour of the cam. The polynomial curve is expressed as

s=

7  i=0

Ci θ i , v =

ds d2 s ,a = dθ dθ 2

(1)

To produce zero jerk at the ends, the conditions in Eq. (2) should be satisfied.

θ = 0, s = 0, s = 0, s = 0, s = 0 θ = ππ = 1, s = h, s = 0, s = 0, s = 0

(2)

Here, h is the total rise of cam. The displacement curve of designed cam is shown in the left-top of Fig. 1, it can be seen that our cam is a dwell-rise-dwell cam. Its velocity curve and acceleration curve are plotted in the right-top and left-bottom

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Fig. 1. Displacement curve of designed cam follower (left-top); velocity curve of designed cam follower (right-top); acceleration curve of designed cam follower (left-bottom); a designed of cam by using 7th degree polynomial curve (right-bottom).

Fig. 2. Generated sample points (red circle) from polynomial curve and line segment, and connection point (blue square). (left) Extracted curve of proposed cam with the control points. (right). (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

respectively, which show that the velocity and acceleration of designed cam are continuous without breaking point. All these curves of designed cam are shown in the right-bottom where the radius of base circle is 0.5 cm. To have a continuous velocity and acceleration at these two connection points, a NURBS curve is used to optimize the whole curve.

2.2. Cam optimization Even though the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of proposed cam are continuous when passing through the polynomial curve and line segment, the velocity and acceleration are discontinued at two connection points of the curve and segment. To realize the continuity of velocity and acceleration in the whole closed loop curve of cam, a NURBS curve is used to optimize the trajectory curve. A p-th degree NURBS curve [28] is defined by n 

C (u ) =

Ni,p (u )wi Pi

i=0 n 

i=0

Ni,p (u )wi

;a ≤ u ≤ b

(3)

where {Pi } are the control points and {wi } are the weight values of the corresponding control points. {Ni, p (u)} are the basis functions of the p-th degree NURBS curve. To optimize proposed cam by using NURBS curve, a group of sample points are generated from the polynomial curve and line segment shown in Fig. 2. Because the velocity and acceleration at the connection points of polynomial curve and line segment vary largely, the connection point of NURBS curve is selected as the middle point of line segment, plotted as blue square in Fig. 2. It means that the starting point and ending point of NURBS are the same point, which are the connection point. Assume that number of generated sample points is N, two more constraints in Eq. (4) are added to keep the same

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Fig. 3. Schematic diagram, link-frame assignments, and link parameters of proposed cam-based quick-action linkage system. Table 1 Link length of the linkage system. Link/Angle

Length/Radian

l0 l1 l2 l3 l4 ࢬABC

3.5 cm 2.0 cm 2.0 cm 9.5 cm 2.0 cm 2π /3

velocity and acceleration at the starting point and the ending point. n 

R i,p (u¯ 0 )Pi =

n 

i=0

i=0

n 

n 

R i,p (u¯ 0 )Pi =

i=0

R i,p (u¯ N )Pi R i,p (u¯ N )Pi

(4)

i=0

where u¯ 0 and u¯ N are the knot value of the beginning point and ending point. Based on this group of sample points and two added constraints, a bicubic NURBS curve is extracted shown in the right part of Fig. 2. The detailed extraction process of NURBS curve based on a group of data points is presented in Appendix B. The average error between sample points and extracted curve is smaller than 0.01. It can be seen that the shape expressed with NURBS curve is the same as the shape with polynomial curve and line segment. However, the displacement, velocity and acceleration in this whole curve are continuous without jumping points. 3. Quick-action linkage mechanism with cam 3.1. Structure design Based on the proposed cam, a quick action linkage system is developed. The schematic diagram of this linkage system is shown in Fig. 3, in which the cam locates at point O. The length dc representing the rise of the cam follower changes with the rotation of cam. Link AB and link BC are welded as one link with a constant angle between them. The length of all the links and the radian of angle ࢬABC are defined as in Table 1, which are used in the following calculations. According to these defined numerical values, the range of the rotation angle and the displacement distance of each link could be calculated. These link parameters can be used to calculate the workspace of this linkage mechanism. Here, the joint B and joint G are active joints and the others are passive joints, which leads the known values for θ c and θ 6 in the following calculation. Because the shape of the cam is already defined, the rise of the cam follower is known when the cam rotates. Therefore, the range of the angle between link BC and fixed line BG can be derived based on the rotation angle θ c of the cam. The sketch map of the range of this angle, named as θ B , is explained as in Fig. 4. When θB = θBmin , points O, A, B locate on a common line where the rise of the cam follower is minimum. When θB = θBmax , the rise of the cam follower dc is maximum dcmax . The line segments OB, link AB, and the link OA form a triangle. The detailed calculation of θBmin and θBmax are derived as in the following equations.

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Fig. 4. Schematic diagram of the range of angle θ B .

Fig. 5. Analysis of maximum θ 3 (left) and minimum θ 3 (right).

For θBmin ,

θBmin =

2π − ∠OBG 3

(5)

where

∠OBG = arccos

2 2 2 lOB + lBG − lOG 2lOB lBG

(6)

For θBmax ,

θBmax =

2π + ∠OBA − ∠OBG 3

(7)

where

∠OBA = arccos

2 2 2 lOB + lAB − lOA 2lOB lAB

(8)

After defining the range of θ B , the range of angle ࢬBCD can be analyzed. For convenience, we express the angle ࢬBCD as θ 3 . In Fig. 5, the schematic diagram of the maximum case and minimum case of θ 3 is shown. When θ3 = θ3min , θB = θBmax and link l4 is perpendicular to link l3 (DG ⊥ CD). The detailed calculations are shown as follows

θ3min = π − ∠CT B − θBmax

(9)

where

∠CT B =

π 2

− ∠BGD

∠BGD = ∠CGD − ∠CGB

∠CGD = arccos

l4 lCG

(10) (11)

(12)

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Fig. 6. Analysis of minimum d4 (left) and maximum d4 (right).

Fig. 7. 3D model of proposed quick-action linkage system.

∠CGB = arccos

2 2 lBG + lCG − l22 2lBG lCG

(13)

When θ3 = θ3max , θB = θBmin and the link l4 is always perpendicular to link l3 (DG ⊥ CD). From the figure, it can be known that θ3max = β1 + β2 . β 1 and β 2 calculated as follows

cos β1 =

2 2 l22 + lCG − lBG 2l2 lCG

β2 = arcsin  lCG =

l4 lCG

2 − 2l l min l22 + lBG 2 BG cos θB

(14) (15) (16)

According to the value of θ B and θ 3 , the range of the length of d4 can be defined. The schematic diagrams of the minimum case and maximum case of d4 are shown in Fig. 6. When d4 = d4min , θB = θBmin and point C, D, G locate on a same line. Then d4min can be calculated as

d4min =



2 − 2l l min − l l22 + lBG 2 BG cos θB 4

(17)

When d4 = d4max , θB = θBmax and points C, D, G also locate on the same line. Then d4max can be calculated as

d4max =



max + l 2 − 2l l l22 + lBG 2 BG cos θB 4

(18)

The range of θ 6 for active joint G is assumed as (0, 2π ). After knowing θ B , θ 3 , d4 , and θ 6 , θ 7 can be exactly calculated. Finally, a three-dimensional model of proposed linkage system based on these parameters is shown in Fig. 7. 3.2. Forward position To define the workspace of the proposed quick-action linkage mechanism, the forward process of position analysis should be done to analyze the trajectory of the end-effector. Our proposed quick-action system is a planar mechanism with six

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196 Table 2 Link parameters of left chain of quick-action system. i

αi−1

ai−1

di

θi

c 1 2 3 4 5(7) E

0 0 0

0 dc l1 l2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 d4 l3 − d4

θc θ1 θ2 θ3 −π / 2

π

−π / 2 0 0

0 0

Table 3 Link parameters of right chain of quick-action system. i

αi−1

ai−1

di

θi

6 7(5) E

π

0

l0 l4 0

0 0 l3 − d4

θ6 θ7 −π / 2

−π / 2

joints, five rotational joints and one prismatic joint. Detailed kinematic parameters and link-frame assignments of this quickaction system are shown in Fig. 3. The parameter in frame {i} is expressed relative to the frame {i − 1}. Note that the frame {0} is coincident with frame {c} when θ c is zero. The locations of the frame {0}, frame {2}, and frame {6} are fixed in this linkage mechanism. The angle between link l1 and link l2 is constant, which are assumed as a welded structure. Because this designed mechanism is a closed-loop linkage system, kinematics is analyzed by separating this system as two chains, the left chain and the right chain. In the left chain, the trajectory of end-effector is analyzed without considering the prismatic joint, and only three rational joints are considered. In the right chain, one prismatic joint and two rotational joints are included to calculate the position of the end-effector. The detailed link parameters based on the assigned frames for the left chain and the right chain are expressed as in Tables 2 and 3, respectively. According to these two tables, the position of the end-effector for the left chain can be calculated by using the corresponding transformation matrices. Finally, the position of frame {E} with respect to frame {0} is expressed as follows by defining α = θc + θ1 + θ2

E 0 pLx = l3 s(α −θ3 ) + l2 cα + l1 c(θc +θ1 ) + dc cθc 0 L E py

= −l3 c(α −θ3 ) + l2 sα + l1 s(θc +θ1 ) + dc sθc

(19)

where sα = sin (α ) and cα = cos (α ), which will also be used in the following calculations. The position of the end-effector for the right chain is calculated according to the link parameters in Table 3. 0 R E px 0 R E py

= l 0 + l 4 c θ6 + ( l 3 − d 4 ) s θ6 − θ 7 = l 4 s θ6 − ( l 3 − d 4 ) c θ6 − θ 7

(20)

3.3. Reverse position When the position of the end-effector of this mechanism is known, the joint parameters satisfying this position requirement can be obtained. In the following part, an algebraic method is used to obtain the appropriate parameters while having a known position of the end-effector. Even though this quick-action system is divided into two chains in the analysis of forward kinematics, the positions of the end-effector for the left chain and the right chain should be equal as in Eq. (21). To solve the inverse kinematics of this system, the cam is not considered by connecting the point G and the point B in Fig. 3. New parameter θ B can be calculated as in Eq. (22) based on the previous defined parameters. Because the lengths of line BG, OG, and BO are constant, ࢬBGO can be calculated by using cosine law. Therefore, there are only two parameters in the left chain, θ B and θ 3 in Fig. 3.



0 L EP

= 0E P R ⇒

0 L E px 0 L E py





=

0 R E px 0 R E py



 

=

θB + ∠BGO = θc + θ1 + θ2

X Y

(21) (22)

According to the previous forward process, the position vector of the end-effector for the left chain is expressed as follows

  X Y



XB + l2 cθB + l3 s(θB −θ3 ) = YB + l2 sθB − l3 c(θB −θ3 )



(23)

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175

Fig. 8. Parameters of cam.

Then

(X − XB )2 + (Y − XB )2 = l22 + l32 − 2l2 l3 sθ3 s θ3 =

(X − XB )2 + (Y − XB )2 − l22 − l32 2l2 l3

(24)

(25)



cθ3 = ± 1 − s2θ

(26)

3

We can get

θ3 = arctan 2(sθ3 , cθ3 )

(27)

After obtaining θ 3 , the Eq. (23) can be rearranged as follows







X − XB k c + k 2 s θB = 1 θB Y − YB k 1 s θB − k 2 c θB



(28)

where

k 1 = l 2 − l 3 s θ3 , k 2 = l 3 c θ3 Suppose

(29)



r = ± k21 + k22

(30)

γ = arctan 2(k2 , k1 )

(31)

k1 = r cos γ , k2 = r sin γ

(32)

So

Then

 X−X  B

r Y −YB r

 =

c γ c θB + s γ s θB c γ s θB − s γ c θB



θB − γ = arctan 2(Y − YB , X − XB )

(33) (34)

And θ B can be obtained as

θB = arctan 2(Y − YB , X − XB ) + γ

(35)

When θ B is known, the sum of θ c , θ 1 , and θ 2 can be calculated. In Section 2.1, the equation of the designed cam is presented, which can be used to calculate the total rise of the cam follower according to a rotation angle. The parameters of the cam in this mechanism are shown in Fig. 8. Assume that the rotation angle ࢬHOF of the cam with respect to its initial position is known, the rise of the cam follower OH can be calculated. Then by using cosine law, angle ࢬHOB can be calculated because the three sides of the triangle HOB are known. Angle ࢬBOG is also known because the position of the

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

point B, O, and G are fixed. Finally, we can get the value of θ c in Eq. (36). When θ c is known, θ 1 can be easily calculated, and θ 2 is also known.

θc = ∠BOG + ∠HOF − ∠HOB

(36)

In Fig. 3, there must be a relationship between θ 2 , θ 3 , θ 6 , and θ 7 because the sum of the four interior angles of quadrangle GBCD is 2π . After a detailed analysis, it can be obtained that θ2 − θ3 = θ6 − θ7 which is defined as δ in the following expression. Then according to the forward kinematics of the right chain, its inverse kinematics can be solved. We have



XG + l4 cθ6 + (l3 − d4 )sδ YG + l4 sθ6 − (l3 − d4 )cδ



  X Y

=

(37)

According to the relationship of θ 2 , θ 3 , θ 6 , and θ 7 , Eq. (37) can be expressed as





l 4 c θ6 l 4 s θ6



=

X − XG − (l3 − d4 )sδ Y − YG + (l3 − d4 )cδ



(38)

Summing the square of these two equations, we can get

l42 = (X − XG )2 − 2(X − XG )(l3 − d4 )sδ + (Y − YG )2 + 2Y (l3 − d4 )cδ + (l3 − d4 )2

(39)

It can be expressed as

a ( l3 − d4 )2 + b( l3 − d4 ) + c = 0

(40)

with

a=1 b = 2Y cδ − 2(X − XG )sδ c = (X − XG )2 + (Y − YG )2 − l42

(41)

Then l3 − d4 can be calculated as

l3 − d4 =

−b ±

√ b2 − 4ac 2a

(42)

When l3 − d4 is known, θ 6 can be calculated as

θ6 = arctan 2(d, e )

(43)

where

Y − YG + (l3 − d4 )cδ l4 X − XG − (l3 − d4 )sδ e= l4

d=

(44)

Because θ2 − θ3 and θ 6 are known, θ 7 can be calculated as θ6 − θ2 + θ3 . 3.4. Velocity, acceleration and static forces According to the previous derivation of the position of the end-effector, the first derivative of the position vector with respect to θ B and θ 3 for the left chain of the designed linkage mechanism is derived as follows

 

u˙ = where



x˙ gL = [GL ]φ˙ L = L11 y˙ g21



−l2 sθB + l3 c(θB −θ3 ) G = l 2 c θB + l 3 s ( θB − θ 3 ) L

gL12 gL22

 φ˙ L

(45)

−l3 c(θB −θ3 ) −l3 s(θB −θ3 )

 (46)

The first derivative of the position vector with respect to d4 , θ 6 and θ 7 for the right chain of the designed linkage mechanism is derived as follows

 



 x˙ gR u˙ = = GR φ˙ R = R11 y˙ g21 where



−sδ G = cδ R

gR12 gR22

−l4 sθ6 + (l3 − d4 )cδ l 4 c θ6 + ( l 3 − d 4 ) s δ

gR13 gR23



φ˙ R

−(l3 − d4 )cδ −(l3 − d4 )sδ

(47)

 (48)

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

with

177

⎡ ⎤   d4 θ B L R ⎣ φ = , φ = θ6 ⎦ θ3 θ7

(49)

Because the end-effector of both two chains has a same velocity, we can get that



[GL ]φ˙ L = GR φ˙ R GL

(50)

GR

where and imply the Jacobian for the left chain and the right chain, respectively. Selecting the joints θ B and θ 6 as the independent joints φ a , and the joints θ 3 , d4 and θ 5 as the dependent joints φ p , Eq. (50) can be rewritten as follows

[G p ]φ˙ p = [Ga ]φ˙ a where

(51)

⎡ ⎤   θ3 θB φa = , φ p = ⎣d4 ⎦ θ6 θ7

and

 Gp =

−gL12 −gL22

(52)



gR11 gR21



gR13 gL , Ga = L11 R g23 g21

−gR12 −gR22

 (53)



p Then the first-order kinematic influence coefficients (KIC) [29] matrix relating φ˙ p to φ˙ a Ga can be defined as

φ˙ p = [G p ]+ [Ga ]φ˙ a

(54)

 p

G a = [G p ]+ [G a ]

(55)

By calculating the second derivative of the position vector, the acceleration of end-effector can be obtained as

u¨ = [GL ]φ¨ L +



 L T  L L φ˙ H φ˙

u¨ = GR φ¨ R +



φ˙ R

T 



H R φ˙ R

(56) (57)

which can be rearranged as

 R G

φ¨ R = [GL ]φ¨ L +

 T   T   φ˙ L H L φ˙ L − φ˙ R H R φ˙ R

(58)

The detailed expression of [HL ] and [HR ] can be seen in Appendix C.1. According to the previous derivation of velocity, the Eq. (58) can be easily rewritten as

[G p ]φ¨ p = [Ga ]φ¨ a +

 T   T   φ˙ L H L φ˙ L − φ˙ R H R φ˙ R

(59)

In addition, the velocity φ˙ p of dependent joints can be expressed as

  θ˙ 3 = Gap 11 θ˙ B + Gap 12 θ˙ 6   d˙4 = Gap θ˙ B + Gap θ˙ 6 21   22 ˙θ7 = Gap θ˙ B + Gap θ˙ 6 31 32

(60)

Then the second entry in the right of Eq. (59) can be derived as

 L T  L L  R T  R R φ˙ H φ˙ − φ˙ H φ˙   ⎡ ⎤ A 12  T A11 2 ˙ ˙ φa ⎥ A12 ⎢ φa A13 ⎥  2  =⎢ B 12 ⎣  T B11 ⎦ 2 ˙ ˙ φa φa B12 B13 2  T = φ˙ a [H ∗ ]φ˙ a

(61)

The dimension of matrix [H∗ ] is 2 × 2 × 2. With these expressions, the Eq. (59) can be simplified as

[G p ]φ¨ p = [Ga ]φ¨ a + φ˙ aT [H ∗ ]φ˙ a

(62)

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196



p

Finally, the second-order kinematic influence coefficients (KIC) array Haa pressed as

3×2×2

relating φ¨ p with φ¨ a and φ˙ a can be ex-

  p φ¨ p = Gap φ¨ a + φ˙ aT Haa φ˙ a

with



(63)



p Haa = [G p ]+ [H ∗ ]

(64)



φ



Here, the pseudo-inverse matrix is calculated by using singular value decomposition (SVD) method. And Haa is defined as



φ



Haa



= 



[0]2×2×2

p

Haa

(65)

3×2×2

5×2×2

Based on the derived velocity and acceleration, the force relation between the independent joints and the dependent joints is calculated as

 T

Ta = GPA

Tp

(66)

with

 

 

TB , Tb = T6

Ta =

T3 T4 T7

(67)

which is calculated based on the duality between the velocity vector and force vector. To activate all the joint actuators, the total effective load is expressed as

 T

Ta∗ = Ta + GPA where



φ

GA



 5×2

=



T3

φ

T Tφ

(68)



 I2p×2 GA

Tφ = TB



Tp = GA

(69)

3×2

T4

T6

T7

T

(70)

and

TB = T2 + TC

(71)

This is because the effective load of joint 2 and joint C is provided by the motor of the cam. The joint parameters of these two separated chains can be expressed in terms of the total active joints as

        L θ˙ B 1 0 θ˙ B θ˙ B  = Ga = ˙6 Gap θ˙ 3 θ˙ 6 θ 1,: ⎡ ⎤ ⎡  p ⎤     Ga d˙4 2,:  R θ˙ B θ˙ ⎣θ˙ 6 ⎦ = Ga = ⎣ 0 1 ⎦ B ˙θ6 θ˙ 6 Gap θ˙ 7 3,:

(72)

(73)

Finally, the output velocity of the end-effector can be expressed as



  R

(74)

  R

(75)

u˙ = [GL ] GLa φ˙ a = GR And we define



[Gua ] = [GL ] GLa = GR

Ga φ˙ a

Ga

u ] is evaluated by referring to [30]. By using the same principle, the second-order kinematic array [Haa

 

φ



 T  L  L

u [Haa ] = GL ◦ Haa + GLa

H

Ga

The product symbol “◦  is also introduced in [30].

(76)

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179

3.5. Dynamic model A generalized inertial loads of a M-link open-chain referring to the independent joint parameters are given as









∗ ∗ Tφ = Iφφ φ¨ + φ˙ T Pφφφ φ˙

(77)

∗ ] and [P ∗ ∗ where [Iφφ φφφ ] denote the effective inertia matrix and the inertia power array, respectively. The symbol stands for L for the left chain or R for the right chain. By employing the principle of virtual work, the open-chain dynamics can be directly incorporated into closed chain dynamics according to

TφT δφ = TaT δφa

(78)

Therefore, the dynamics of this linkage mechanism is expressed as



φ

Ta = Ga

T

Tφ = [Iaa ]φ¨ a + φ˙ aT [Paaa ]φ˙ a

(79)

Finally, the dynamic formulation with respect to the output coordinates can be calculated as

Tu = [Iuu ]u¨ + u˙ T [Puuu ]u˙

(80)

Tu , [Iuu ], and [Puuu ] denote the load vector, the inertial matrix, and inertial power array of the end-effector, respectively. The expressions of [Iaa ], [Paaa ], [Iuu ], and [Puuu ] are shown in Appendix C.2. 3.6. Singularity analysis The linage mechanism reaches a singularity configuration when the determinant of the Jacobian matrix vanishes [31]. The Jacobian matrix of this linkage mechanism is [Gua ] = [GL ][GLa ] by integrating Eqs. (55) and (75). Then det ([Gua ] ) = p det ([GL ] )[Ga ]2,2 = 0 can be decomposed as the following two cases:

det

 L  G



= 0 or Gap

2,2

=0

(81)

When det ([GL ] ) = 0, it leads

l2 l3 cos θ3 = 0

(82)

It means that this linkage mechanism reaches a singularity configuration when θ3 = kπ /2, k = 1, 3, 5, .... For the case p p of [Ga ]2,2 = 0, det ([G p ][GTp ] ) = 0 is assumed for calculating the pseudo-inverse of [Gp ]. Then the result of [Ga ]2,2 = 0 is expressed as

 

gR12 gR21 − gR11 gR22



gR12 gR23 − gR13 gR22



gL12 gR21 − gR11 gL22 +





gL12 gR23 − gR13 gL22 = 0

(83)

After a detailed calculation, a simplified result is expressed as 2





l 4 ( l 3 − d 4 ) c θ7 s ( θB − θ 2 ) + l 4 s θ7 − l 3 + d 4 c ( θB − θ 2 ) = 0

(84)

which is a function of parameters θ B , θ 2 , d4 , and θ 7 . When these parameters satisfy the condition in Eq. (84), this proposed linkage mechanism reaches a singularity configuration. 4. 3-DOF parallel manipulator In this section, the previously proposed quick-action linkage mechanism is extended to construct a parallel manipulator. This proposed parallel manipulator includes four extended linkage mechanisms, one fixed base platform and one output platform. It has three degrees of freedom, rotating along X axis, rotating along Y axis, and translating along Z axis. All these three types of movements can realize quick-action. In the following subsections, the design process, output action, kinematics, and dynamics of this parallel manipulator are analyzed. 4.1. Extended quick-action mechanism A three-dimensional model of the extended linkage system is shown in Fig. 9, in which two rotational joints are added. The two rotation joints intersect at the end point of the end-effector of previous linkage mechanism. The shape of the endeffector of this extended linkage mechanism is designed as a square column, which is used to remain perpendicular to the output platform. Based on the forward kinematics of previous quick-action linkage mechanism, the frames of these two newly added joints are aligned as in Figs. 10 and 11. In Fig. 10, frame {E} is coincident with frame {8} when θ 8 is zero, and both of these two frames locate at the end point of the previous linkage system. Frame {5} in this figure is the same as the frame {5} in

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Fig. 9. 3D model of extended quick-action system.

Fig. 10. Link parameters and assigned frame of joint 8.

Fig. 11. Link parameters and assigned frame of joint 9.

Table 4 Link parameters of extended quick-action system. i

αi−1

ai−1

di

θi

8 9 E∗

0 − θ9 0

0 0 0

0 0 l9

θ8 0 0

Fig. 3. In Fig. 11, frame {9} also locate at the same point, and frame {E∗ } has the same rotation direction with frame {9}. Link parameters derived based on these two figures are shown in Table 4. According to the link parameters, the transformation matrix of frame {E∗ } with respect to frame {E} can be obtained. Detailed process of forward kinematics for these two newly added joints can be expressed as

 E E∗ T

=

E E∗ R

01×3

E E∗ P

1

 (85)

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

with

 E E∗ R

=

and

−sθ8 cθ9 c θ8 c θ9 −sθ9

c θ8 s θ8 0

 E E∗ P

−l9 sθ8 sθ9 l 9 c θ8 s θ9 l 9 c θ9

=



−sθ8 sθ9 c θ8 s θ9 c θ9

 

Nx = l9 Ny Nz

181

 (86)

− → = l9 N

(87)

Then θ 8 and θ 9 can be easily obtained.

−  → θ9 = arccos N z

(88)

 −  → → −

θ8 = arctan 2 −

Nx Ny , s θ9 s θ9

(89)

Based on the analysis of previous linkage mechanism and this above transformation matrix, the first derivative of the position vector for this new end-effector E∗ with respect to frame {0} is calculated as





∗ u˙ ∗ = u˙ + l9 0E R Guφe φ˙ e

where

 ∗

u =









XE ∗ YE ∗ , u = ZE ∗

Guφe =



(90)

  XE YE 0

−cθ8 sθ9 −sθ8 sθ9 0

(91)

−sθ8 cθ9 c θ8 c θ9 −sθ9

  θ φe = 8 θ9

 (92)

(93)

The second derivative of the position vector for this new end-effector E∗ is calculated as









∗ ∗ u¨ ∗ = u¨ + l9 0E R Guφe φ¨ e + φ˙ eT Hφue φe φ˙ e

(94)

u∗

where the detailed expressions of [Hφ φ ]3×2×2 can be seen Appendix C.3. The dynamic model of this extended linkage e e mechanism can be expressed as





TE ∗ = TE + Iφe φe φ¨ e +

 T  φ˙ e Pφe φe φe φ˙ e

(95)

And [Iφe φe ], [Pφe φe φe ] denote the inertial matrix and the inertial power array of link 8 and link 9, respectively. Therefore, the dynamic formulation with respect to the new end-effector E∗ can be expressed as

Tu∗ = Tu + [Iu∗ u∗ ]u¨ ∗ + [u˙ ∗ ] [Pu∗ u∗ u∗ ]u˙ ∗ T

(96)

where [Iu∗ u∗ ] and [Pu∗ u∗ u∗ ] represent the inertial matrix and inertial power array defined at the output position, respectively. Their expressions are similar to [Iuu ] and [Puuu ] in Appendix C.2. 4.2. Design of proposed parallel manipulator Parallel manipulators possess high force loading capacity and fine motion characteristics because of the closed-loop mechanism. The stiffness of a closed-loop kinematic chain is much higher than that of an open-loop structure, and the deformations can often be measured easily due to passive compliance. To develop a parallel manipulator based on previously extended quick-action linkage mechanism, the property of the closed-loop is also needed to be considered. A threedimensional model of our proposed parallel manipulator is shown in Fig. 12. In this manipulator, there are four linkage mechanisms possessing the property of quadrantal symmetry, which leads the manipulator being a zero-torsion parallel manipulator [32]. These four chains form a closed-loop parallel structure. The base platform and output platform of this parallel manipulator locate on the same plane when this manipulator stays at the initial position. To realize the movements of this parallel manipulator, its output platform is specially designed. The schematic map of this output platform is shown in Fig. 13 where two mutually perpendicular grooves with a common intersection point in each quadrant are designed. At the initial position, the reference frames of both base platform and output platform are coincident, in which origin O, axis X, and axis Y locate on a same plane, and the perpendicular axis to this plane is defined

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

Fig. 12. Perspective views of the 3D model of designed parallel manipulator.

Fig. 13. Output platform of developed parallel manipulator. (top view). (For interpretation of the references to colour in the text, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

as axis Z according to the right-hand rule. The width of the grooves locate on this platform is designed as the same as the width of the square column of link 9 of the extended linkage mechanism. Therefore, the link 9 can only move along the groove direction without any rotation. The end-effector {E∗ } for each chain can slide along two directions, X and Y. With this designed output platform, three types of movement for this parallel manipulator can be realized, which are translation along axis Z, rotation along axis X and rotation along axis Y. For the translation along Z axis, the end-effectors of four chains simultaneous move along a same direction. Because the distances between these four end-effectors keep the same during the whole movement, the end-effectors {E∗ } are relatively static with respect to the output platform without sliding. However, for the rotation along axis X or axis Y, the end-effectors {E} of two adjacent chains simultaneous move along axis Z, and the end-effector {E} of two other chains keep static. During these movements, the links 9 of the extended linkage mechanism for four chains are always perpendicular to the output platform. To hold this status, the end-effectors {E∗ } of the first two chains should slide in the grooves along the direction of the green arrows for the rotation along axis X and the direction of the red arrows for the rotation along axis Y in Fig. 13, respectively. All these three types of movements of this parallel manipulator have two phases, a fast-out phase and a slowback phase, because of the specially designed cam.

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183

Fig. 14. Transformations of the coordinate frames between base platform (top) and output platform (bottom).

4.3. Kinematic analysis When the positions of the end-effectors for four chains are known, the pose of the output platform can be easily obtained. The initial positions of these end-effectors {E∗ } are at the intersection point of two perpendicular grooves in each quadrant. According to the transformations of the local coordinate frames of four end-effectors in Fig. 14, these four position vectors can be expressed with respect to the absolute coordinate frame of the base platform as follows

1  x 1 y 1 z



=

3  x 3 y 3 z

 2 

L − 1 xE ∗ L + 1 zE ∗ , 1 ∗ yE

 =

x 2 y 2 z



−L − 2 zE ∗ L − 2 xE ∗ 2 ∗ yE

=

 4 

−L + 3 xE ∗ −L − 3 zE ∗ , 3 ∗ yE

x 4 y 4 z





(97)

L + 4 zE ∗ −L + 4 xE ∗ 4 ∗ yE

=

 (98)

Here the frame {i xE ∗ ,i yE ∗ ,i zE ∗ } for the i-th chain is expressed with respect to its local frame {i x0 , i y0 , i z0 }. Based on these four position vectors, the plane equation of the output platform can be obtained. The normal vector is calculated by finding the cross product of the following two vectors

1

v1 =



x − 2x 1 y − 2 y , v2 = 1 z − 2z

3



x − 2x 3 y − 2y 3 z − 2z

(99)

The normal vector is expressed as

 = Nxi + Ny j + Nzk N with

(100)

1      y − 2y 3z − 2z − 1z − 2z 3y − 2y       Ny = − 1 x − 2 x 3 z − 2 z + 1 z − 2 z 3 x − 2 x 1 2 3     2 1 2 3 2 Nx = Nz =

x− x

y− y −

y− y

x− x

= By defining the unit normal vector as n













 N

N





= nx , ny , nz , the plane equation of the output platform is expressed as

nx x − 4 x + ny y − 4 y + nz z − 4 z = 0

(101)

However, the output in a three-dimensional space is always expressed with three angles [α , β , γ ] and a position vector [xt , yt , zt ] for the center of the output platform instead of a plane equation. These six variables can be obtained based on the previous derived plane equation. First, the rotation matrix with three assumed angles by using the x − y − z Euler method is expressed as

R = RX (α )RY (β )RZ (γ ) cβ cγ sα sβ cγ + cα sγ = −cα sβ cγ + sα sγ

−cβ sγ −sα sβ sγ + cα cγ cα sβ sγ + sα cγ

sβ −sα cβ cα cβ

 (102)

This rotation matrix can be decomposed by using the Cayley’s formula for orthonormal matrices.

R = (I3 − S )−1 (I3 + S )

(103)

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

Fig. 15. Lateral view of the positions of the end-effectors of four extended linkage mechanisms with the rotation of the output platform.

And S is skew-symmetric matrix with the components of the unit normal vector of the output platform plane.



S=

0 −nz ny

nz 0 −nx

−ny nx 0



(104)

Therefore, after obtaining the rotation matrix R, three angles is calculated as

  α = arctan − RR2333 β = arcsin (R13 )   γ = arctan − RR1211

(105)

To calculate the position vector of the origin a sketch map of the lateral view of the output  of the   output   platform,  platform is shown in Fig. 15. Assume that 1 z = 2 z , 3 z = 4 z , and {1 z} ≤ {3 z}. The rotation angle of output platform is calculated as

θ = arccos

3

z − 1z 2h

(106)

Here h represents the distance between the two end-effectors {E∗ } of two adjacent extended linkage mechanisms. The position vector of the origin of the output platform is expressed as

  xt yt zt



=

h ∗ cθ − h 0 z0 − h ∗ sθ



(107)

And the current positions 3 z, 4 z in the figure is updated as 3 z∗ , 4 z∗ with a rotation angle θ . 3 ∗

z = 4 z ∗ = 1 z − 2h ∗ sθ

(108)

In the previous analysis, three angles and the center position vector of the output platform are obtained once the four position vectors of the end-effectors of the four chains are known. However, in the inverse kinematics, these four position vectors are needed to control the active joints if the output platform state is given. When three independent outputs (α , β , zt ) are given, other three dependent outputs can be obtained according to the three types of movements. When the platform does not rotate along axis X, α = 0,

γ =0 xt = (z0 − zt ) ∗ cot β

(109)

yt = 0

And when the platform does not rotates along axis Y, β = 0,

γ =0

xt = 0 yt = (z0 − zt ) ∗ cot α

(110)

Once these six parameters are known, the plane of the output platform can be calculated by using the previous equations. The output plane is expressed as

nx (x − xt ) + ny (y − yt ) + nz (z − zt ) = 0

(111)

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

185

The instantaneous positions of four end-effectors can be expressed as

1 

  2 

x

1

h

=

y

3 



x

x

,

h

−h

2



=

y



−h h

 4 



x

h = , 4 = 3 −h −h y y

and i



(112)

   1  i nx x − xt + ny i y − yt nz

z = zt −

(113)

For each single linkage mechanism, the active joints can be obtained by using the inverse kinematic analysis in previous section. 4.4. First-order kinematics According to the previous description, the relation of the output frame and the base frame for each linkage mechanism can be expressed as a transformation matrix, defined as i Tob . By finding the first derivative of the position vector (position terms in i Tob ) of end-effector for each linkage chain, the first-order kinematics of the output platform can be obtained as

 = V

1



GVφ φ˙ 1 =

2



3

GVφ φ˙ 2 =



4

GVφ φ˙ 3 =



GVφ φ˙ 4

(114)

 denote the linear velocity vector of the output platform in the operational space. φ˙ i denotes the joint velocity where V vector of linkage chain i. In Sections 3.2 and 4.1, the rotation matrix of the end-effector expressed in global coordinate system was derived. According to these rotation matrix, three Euler-angles can be obtained by using Eq. (105). The angular velocity of the output platform is obtained by differentiating the Euler angles [α , β , γ ]T with respect to time.

 = w

1



2

˙ Gw φ φ1 =



˙ Gw φ φ2 =

3



˙ Gw φ φ3 =

4



˙ Gw φ φ4

(115)

 denote the angular velocity vector of the output platform in the operational space. where w The linear velocity vector of the output platform for these four chains can be directly expressed as

u˙ =

1



2

Guφ φ˙ 1 =



Guφ φ˙ 2 =

3



Guφ φ˙ 3 =

4



Guφ φ˙ 4

(116)

where the output velocity vector is denoted as

u˙ =

  v

(117)

 w

Congregating the Jacobians of previous equations, the Jacobian matrix of this output platform is obtained as

i

 i



Guφ =



GVv

i



i

GVφ

w



(118)



where i GVv denotes the mapping between the absolute linear velocity vector and the linear velocity vector in operational space. Because the end-effectors of four linkage mechanisms have the same output velocity on the output platform, three loop constraint equations can be obtained from Eq. (116). By manipulating these constraint equations using the same method in Section 3.4, the relation between the dependent joints and the independent joints is expressed as P

J p P φ˙ p = P Ja P φ˙ a

(119)

It can be rearranged as P

φ˙ p =

P

φ˙ a =

P

φ˙ p =

where

with i

φ˙ p =

P + P Jp

  

1

θ˙ B

1

φ˙ p

i

θ˙ 3

Ja P φ˙ a = 1

θ˙ 6

2

i

2

φ˙ p

d˙4

P

θ˙ B 3

i

Gap

θ˙ 7

P

φ˙ a

2

φ˙ p

θ˙ 6 4

i

θ˙ 8

(120)

3

φ˙ p i

θ˙ B

T

θ˙ 9

3

θ˙ 6

4

θ˙ B

4

θ˙ 6

T

(121) (122)

T

(123)

Incorporating the kinematic relation of Eq. (120) into first linkage mechanism, its joint velocity can be expressed as 1

φ˙ =



1



φ P ˙ φ

Ga

a

(124)

186

where

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196



1

φ



Ga

 =

1

1

0 0 0 P p Ga

0

0

0

 (125)

(1−5;∗)

Submitting Eq. (124) to Eq. (116) yields the relationship between the output velocity vector and the independent joints velocity vector.

u˙ =

1

Guφ

1



φ P ˙ φa = [Gua ]P φ˙ a

Ga

(126)

4.5. Singularity analysis The singularity of this parallel manipulator occurs when the Jacobian matrix, which is given by [Gua ] ∈ R6×8 , does not have full rank. It corresponds to a configuration in which the end-effector of a linkage mechanism reaches either its workspace boundary or an internal boundary limiting various sub-regions of the workspace [33]. In other words, the singularity occurs when the end-effector reaches a dead-point. However, this kind of singularity does not happen in the proposed parallel manipulator because the output platform having four groups of two mutually perpendicular grooves and the property of quadrantal symmetry is specially designed to limit the movements of the end-effectors of all the four chains. 5. Simulation results and discussion In this section, the workspace of proposed cam-based quick-action linkage mechanism is shown with different limit conditions. According to the defined condition, a fixed trajectory is selected to show the detailed process of the movement of the end-effector. Then the simulations of the designed parallel manipulator based on this linkage mechanism are introduced with its different types of movements. The trajectories and all the link parameters of four chains in these movements are also presented. Finally, the possible applications of both proposed quick-action linkage mechanism and 1T2R parallel manipulator are discussed. 5.1. Cam-based quick action linkage mechanism In Section 2, the detailed design process of the high speed cam based quick action linkage mechanism was presented. The ranges of all the link parameters were also defined based on the length of links and the contour of the cam. To define the workspace of this linkage mechanism, the workspace for the left chain and the right chain of this mechanism are drawn separately. The Monte Carlo method is used to plot the possible positions of the end effector, and the detailed process of this method is arranged as a flow chart in Fig. 16. In this Monte Carlo method, a vector with two thousand random values is first generated. According to the maximum and the minimum limitation values of each link parameter in previous section, two thousand value for each joint parameter are obtained. For the workspace of the left part and right part of the linkage mechanism, 20 0 04 combination tests of θ c , θ 1 , θ 2 , and θ 3 and 20 0 03 combination tests of d4 , θ 6 , and θ 7 are used to plot the point clouds of the corresponding workspace, respectively. For these seven joint parameters, one more limit condition is added as in Eq. (127).

θc + θ1 + θ2 + θ3 < θ3max + θBmin + ∠BGD

(127)

Finally, the plotted workspace is shown in Fig. 17 with red points for the left and blue points for the right. The intersected workspace of left chain and right chain is shown in Fig. 18, which is the maximum valid workspace of this designed linkage mechanism. If the position of the end-effector locate into this workspace, all the joint parameters can be obtained by solving the inverse kinematics. From the valid workspace of this linkage mechanism, a vertical line segment is selected as the fixed trajectory of its end effector as in Fig. 18. To simultaneously make the end-effector follow this line segment and guarantee the uniform rotation of the cam, the input of the active joint 6 should be accurately controlled. The whole movement process of this linkage mechanism can be divided into the two phases, the fast-out phase and the slow-back phase. In Fig. 19, the end-effector moves from the top to the bottom, and the trajectory of all the links in this fast-out phase are plotted. Here even though the cam rotates with a constant speed, the velocity of the end effector is not uniform. In the beginning, it moves quickly because the distance of first two positions of the end effector is obviously big. When it moves to the bottom position, it almost dwells which can be seen from the dense trajectory of the end-effector. The detailed link parameters during the fast-out phase are shown in Fig. 20. The uniform rotation of the cam can be proved by the linear trajectory of its rotation angle. The curve of d4 can indirectly prove that the velocity of the end effector decrease in the whole movements. The smooth and continuous angle value of θ 6 in the figure indicates that the control of this active joint is not difficult to guarantee the linear movement of the end-effector. In the slow-back phase, the end effector of the linkage mechanism moves from the bottom to the top in Fig. 21. In the movement of this phase, the cam rotate with the same constant velocity as in fast-out phase. However, due to the contour of the cam, the end effector moves very slow. From the figure, it can be seen that the trajectory of all these links are much

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

187

Fig. 16. Flow chart of Monte Carlo method.

denser than that in fast-out phase. The rotation angle range of cam the in slow-back phase is much bigger than in fast-out phase. In Fig. 22, the joint value of all the links during the movement in this slow-back phase are plotted. The trajectory curve of the rotation angle of the cam is still a line because of its uniform rotation. The trajectory curve of d4 shows that d4 almost stay the same in the beginning and the ending. The end effector also has this property because the designed cam belongs to the type of dwell-rise-dwell. The smooth trajectory curve of angle θ 6 also means this linear trajectory of the end-effector can be realized with a simple control method for this active joint θ 6 . 5.2. Results of proposed parallel manipulator Based on the extended quick-action linkage mechanism, there are three degrees of freedom for the proposed parallel manipulator with four chains. First, during the translation movement along axis Z, this parallel manipulator has two same movement phases as the linkage mechanism, a fast-out phase and a slow-back phase.This is because all the four linkage mechanisms have a same movement as the previous analysis of the single linkage mechanism. The difference is that two newly added joints of the extended linkage mechanism should be controlled for keeping the end-effectors of the four chains perpendicular to the output platform. The trajectories of all the links during these two movement phases are shown in Fig. 23. To have a clear understanding of this translation movement, the corresponding joint parameters are introduced and discussed. In Fig. 24, the link parameters of θ 8 and θ 9 for all the chains of this parallel manipulator in the translation along axis Z are shown, in which the joint parameters in fast-out phase and slow-back phase are plotted in the top and bottom, respectively. All the other joint parameters for all these four chains in the two phases are the same as in Figs. 20 and 22.

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

Fig. 17. Maximum workspace of manipulator by considering the sum of θ c to θ 3 < θ3max + θBmin (red points for left chain; blue points for right chain). (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

Fig. 18. Fixed trajectory in the workspace of linkage mechanism.

Because the cams and links of these four linkage mechanisms simultaneous move, it leads to the same value for every joint parameter of these four chains. By comparing these two phases, it can be seen that the number of trajectory pose in fast-out phase is smaller than in slow-back phase. For the rotation along axis X, the trajectories of all the links in both fast-out phase and slow-back phase are shown in Fig. 25. To realize this movement of the parallel manipulator, the end-effectors {E} of linkage mechanism 1 and 2 simultaneously move down along axis Z while the end-effectors {E} of linkage mechanism 3 and 4 stay static. The end-effectors {E∗ } of the four extended linkage mechanisms move to keep the link {9} of four chains perpendicular to the output platform. Similar to the translation process, the number of trajectory pose in fast-out phase of the rotation process is smaller than in slow-back phase. This is because the rotation angle of the cam in fast-out phase is smaller than that in slow-back phase. The rotation trajectory along axis Y is similar to axis X. In all these rotation process, linkage mechanism i and i + 1 move down and two other linkage mechanisms stay static.

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

Fig. 19. Trajectory of the linkage mechanism in fast-out phase.

Fig. 20. Link parameters of the linkage mechanism in fast-out phase.

Fig. 21. Trajectory of the linkage mechanism in slow-back phase.

189

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

Fig. 22. Link parameters of the linkage mechanism in slow-back phase.

Fig. 23. Trajectories of parallel manipulator in both fast-out phase and slow back phase during the translation process along axis Z.

Fig. 24. Link parameters of θ 8 and θ 9 for all the four chains of parallel manipulator during the translation process along axis Z.

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191

Fig. 25. Trajectories of parallel manipulator in both fast-out phase and slow back phase during the rotation process along axis X.

Fig. 26. Link parameters of θ 8 and θ 9 for all the four chains of parallel manipulator during the rotation process along axis X.

In Fig. 26, the joint parameters of θ 8 and θ 9 for all the four chains of proposed parallel manipulator during the rotation process of two phases along axis X are presented. The first six joint parameters of linkage mechanism 1 and linkage mechanism 2 have the same value as in Fig. 20 for the fast-out phase and Fig. 22 for the slow-back phase because these two mechanism simultaneous move while the other two mechanisms stay static. For the angles of joint 8 and joint 9 for four linkage mechanism, these two joint angles are different because they should rotate to keep the link {9} perpendicular to the output platform. Based on these analysis of the possible movements for this parallel manipulator and the limitation of its output platform, it can be obtained that the workspace of this parallel manipulator is a quadrate column. 5.3. Discussion of control and potential applications 5.3.1. Control strategy To realize the corresponding movements of the linkage mechanism, two motors are needed to be mounted at joint O and joint G in Fig. 3, respectively. According to the angle curve of θ c (Angle of CAM) in both the fast-out phase and the slow back phase, shown in Figs. 20 and 21, motor control for driving the cam is a simply rotation with a constant speed because the angle in the two movement cases linearly increases or decreases. Comparing to θ c , motor control for θ 6 is more complex because of its nonlinear curve during both the two movement cases. However, the value of θ 6 continuously varies without a saltation. Actually, the value of θ 6 smoothly increases in the fast-out phase and smoothly decreases in the slow-back phase. Furthermore, the total variant for θ 6 in these two cases is very small. It means that the rotation of this motor can also be easily controlled without having large accelerations. By extending the control strategy of the proposed linkage mechanism, eight motors are totally needed for the parallel manipulator because two motors are needed to drive the two active joints for each branch linkage mechanism. Even through

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J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

the linkage mechanism is extended with two more joints for the connection with the output platform, these newly added two joints are passive joints. In addition, considering the property of quadrantal symmetry for this parallel manipulator, two adjacent linkage mechanisms must be simultaneously controlled for the rotation movements, and all the four linkage mechanisms must be simultaneously controlled for the translation movement. The location and direction of the output platform are correspondingly defined based on the end-effectors of the four linkage mechanisms.

5.3.2. Applications of proposed linkage mechanism Considering the property of the fast-out motion and the slow-back motion of this proposed linkage mechanism, a few possible applications are listed here. The first application is that it can be probably installed on a door. When people walk close to the door, the linkage mechanism can quickly open the door by using the motion in fast-out phase. After passing through the door, the door can be slowly closed by using the motion of linkage mechanism in slow-back phase. The second possible application is for a jumping robot. When the robot begins to jump, the motion in the fast-out phase can be used to have a large force in a short time. The motion in the slow-back phase can be used to make the links come back to the initial pose when the robot is in the air. This can make the jumping robot continuously jump. The third expected application is pick-and-place machines. In the picking process, the manipulator can quickly move to the goal position for grabbing an object, and then it can slowly move to the destination point for releasing the object.

5.3.3. Applications of proposed parallel manipulator According to the previous analysis and simulations, the proposed 1T2R parallel manipulator has the property of quickaction in all the three types of movements. In addition, the base platform and output platform in the initial position almost locate in the same place. Because of this, this parallel manipulator can be installed in some place which has large floor area but with small volume. Due to these properties, it can be used in many applications. Firstly, it can be installed on the ceiling of a room with a projector, which is fixed on the output platform of the parallel manipulator. In traditional mobile device of the projector, it makes the projector move out and move back with a constant speed. When the presenter urgently wants to use the projector for a meeting, a long time is needed to make the projector move to the desired place. However, if this proposed parallel manipulator is installed, the projector can move to the desired position in a short time. When the presenter finishes the presentation, the projector can slowly move back to its initial position. Another advantage of installing this parallel manipulator on a ceiling is that there is a large area in the ceiling but with small volume. Secondly, this parallel manipulator also can be installed on the back of a TV. When people begin to watch TV, the parallel manipulator can rotate the TV to a desired place in a short time. When TV is turned off, the TV can move back to its initial position slowly. The third possible application is in the soft drink factory. When a bottle of drink is full, the cap should be immediately put back on the bottle in a flow line production. To realize this, this proposed parallel manipulator can be installed on the top of the bottle. Our parallel manipulator can quickly finish the motion, and slowly move back to wait for the next bottle. Because the designed cam belongs to the dwell-rise-dwell type, this parallel manipulator also has two dwell phase. When the cap close to the bottle, the translational speed of the output platform decreases. This can avoid the bottle bear too much force because of its high speed in the fast-out phase.

6. Conclusion In this paper, a 1T2R quick-action parallel manipulator was developed, which is composed of four linkage mechanisms in a way of quadrantal symmetry. Firstly, the linkage mechanism was designed based on a high speed cam which leads to its two movement phases, fast-out phase and slow-back phase. With the given length of links, the ranges of the joint parameters were defined. To analyze the motion characteristic of this mechanism, the forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, dynamics, and static forces of this linkage mechanism were discussed in detail. Secondly, the design of the parallel manipulator was also presented in detail to realize the three types of movements, translate along axis Z, and rotate along axis X, or axis Y. To connect the end-effectors of the linkage mechanisms with the output platform, two revolute joints were added and an output platform with four groups of grooves was designed. Kinematics and dynamic analysis of the newly added joints of the extended linkage mechanism were done. To analyze the movement of the parallel manipulator, its position analysis and first-order kinematics are introduced. To validate the proposed linkage mechanism and the parallel manipulator, simulation results of the kinematic analysis were shown. For linkage mechanism, the trajectories of all the links and the joint parameters with a fixed trajectory of the end-effector were presented. For parallel manipulator, the output actions and results of translation along axis Z and rotation along axis X were shown. The values of all the joint parameters of four chains in these two types of movements were presented in two phases, fast-out phase and slow-back phase. Based on these analysis and the properties, the possible applications of both the linkage mechanism and parallel manipulator were discussed. These promising results show that both of the linkage mechanism and the parallel manipulator can enhance the production efficiency in industrial applications.

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

193

Appendix A. List of mathematical symbols

min

θB θB

max

dc 0 R Ep 0 L Ep

[GR ] [GL ] [Gap ] p ] [Haa ∗ Iφφ ∗ Pφφφ

Iaa Paaa Iuu Puuu Iφe φe Pφe φe φe Iu∗ u∗ Pu∗ u∗ u∗

minimum value of angle θB maximum value of angle θB rise of the cam follower position vector of the frame {E } with respect to the frame {0} for the right chain position vector of the frame {E } with respect to the frame {0} for the left chain Jacobian matrix for the right chain of the linkage mechanism Jacobian matrix for the left chain of the linkage mechanism the first-order KIC matrix the second-order KIC matrix effective inertia matrix of all the joints for an open chain mechanism inertia power array of all the joints for an open chain mechanism inertia matrix of the active joints for a closed chain mechanism inertia power array of the active joints for a closed chain mechanism inertia matrix of the end-effector inertia power array of the end-effector inertia matrix of the link 8 and link 9 inertia power array of the link 8 and link 9 inertia matrix defined at the output position of the extended linkage mechanism inertia power array defined at the output position of the extended linkage mechanism

Appendix B. Extraction of NURBS curve Given the raw data points {Q0 , . . . , Qm } and an error bound E, the extracted curve using global approximation method exactly pass through the two end points Q0 and Qm . It means that the first control point and last control point are the same as these two end points. The error between the remaining points and extracted curve is calculated as follows

f =

m −1 



Hk Hk − 2

k=1

+

m −1 



k=1

n−1 



Ri,p (uk )(Hk Pi )

i=1 n−1 



Ri,p (uk )Pi

i=1

n−1 

 Ri,p (uk )Pi

(B.1)

i=1

where

Hk = Qk − R0,p (u¯ k )Q0 − Rn,p (u¯ k )Qm

T (u ) =

n 

Ni,p (u )wi , Ri,p (u ) = Ni,p (u )wi /T (u ) ⇒ C (u ) =

i=0

(B.2) n 

Ri,p (u )Pi

(B.3)

i=0

Least-square method is used to minimize this scalar-valued function f. We set the derivative of function f with respect to n − 1 control points, {Pl }, equal to zero. Then the solution is expressed as follows n−1  i=1



m −1  k=1



Rl,p (uk )Ri,p (uk ) Pi =

m −1 

Rl,p (uk )Hk

(B.4)

k=1

Initially, p+1 control points are calculated from the raw data points. All of the raw data points are projected onto the extracted curve to calculate the average distance between raw data and the extracted curve. The detailed process and calculation of a point projection onto a B-spline curve can be referred to [28,34]. If this average distance is bigger than the error bound E, the point with the biggest distance to extracted curve is selected. According to the projection point of this point, a new knot can be found. After insert this new knot into the original knot vector, new control points can be calculated based on this new knot vector. This process is terminated until the average distance is smaller than the error bound E.

194

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

Appendix C. Detailed expression of equations C1. Expression of [HL ] and [HR ] [HL ]2 × 2 × 2 and [HR ]2 × 3 × 3 are expressed as follows



11

⎤ ∂ gL12  L h1,11 ∂ θB ⎥ ⎥= L ∂ gL ⎦

h1,21

hL1,22

∂ gL21 ⎢ ∂ θB  L H =⎢ 2 ⎣ ∂ gL

⎤ ∂ gL22  L ∂ θB ⎥ ⎥ = h2,11 hL2,21 ∂ gL ⎦

hL2,12

∂ gL11 ⎢ ∂ θB  L H =⎢ 1 ⎣ ∂ gL ⎡

∂ θ3

21

∂ θ3

12

∂ θ3

hL1,12

 (C.1)

 (C.2)

hL2,22

22

∂ θ3

with

hL1,11 = −l2 cθB − l3 s(θB −θ3 ) hL1,12 = hL1,21 = −hL1,22 = l3 s(θB −θ3 ) hL2,11 = −l2 sθB + l3 c(θB −θ3 ) hL2,12 = hL2,21 = −hL2,22 = −l3 c(θB −θ3 )

(C.3) (C.3)

and

⎡ ∂ gR

11

⎢ ∂ d4 ⎢ ⎢ ∂ gR 11 H =⎢ ⎢ ∂ θ6 1 ⎢ ⎣ R ∂ g11 ∂ θ7 ⎡ ∂ gR21 ⎢ ∂ d4 ⎢ ⎢ ∂ gR  R 21 H =⎢ ⎢ ∂ θ6 2 ⎢ ⎣ ∂ gR 21 ∂ θ7 

R

∂ gR12 ∂ d4 ∂ gR12 ∂ θ6 ∂ gR12 ∂ θ7 ∂ gR22 ∂ d4 ∂ gR22 ∂ θ6 ∂ gR22 ∂ θ7

∂ gR13 ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ hR1,11 hR1,12 hR1,13 ∂ d4 ⎥ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ∂ gR13 ⎥ ⎥ ⎥=⎢ ⎢hR1,21 hR1,22 hR1,23 ⎥ ⎥ ∂ θ6 ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ R R R R ⎦ h1,31 h1,32 h1,33 ∂ g13 ∂ θ7 ⎤ ∂ gR23 ⎡ R h2,11 hR2,12 hR2,13 ∂ d4 ⎥ ⎥ ⎢ ∂ gR23 ⎥ ⎥ = ⎢ hR2,21 hR2,22 hR2,23 ⎥ ∂ θ6 ⎥ ⎣ hR2,31 hR2,32 hR2,33 ∂ gR23 ⎦ ∂ θ7

(C.4)

⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎦

(C.5)

with

hR1,11 = 0 hR1,22 = −l4 cθ6 − (l3 − d4 )sδ hR1,33 = −hR1,23 = −hR1,32 = −(l3 − d4 )sδ hR1,12 = hR1,21 = −hR1,13 = −hR1,31 = −cδ

(C.6)

hR2,11 = 0 hR2,22 = −l4 sθ6 + (l3 − d4 )cδ hR2,33 = −hR2,23 = −hR2,32 = (l3 − d4 )cδ hR2,12 = hR2,21 = −hR2,13 = −hR2,31 = −sδ

(C.7)

C2. Expression of [Iaa ], [Paaa ], [Iuu ] and [Puuu ] The inertial matrix [Iaa ] and inertial power array [Paaa ] are expressed as

 T  L  L

[Iaa ] = GLa

Iφφ

 T  R  R

Ga + GRa

Iφφ

Ga

(C.8)

J. Wu et al. / Mechanism and Machine Theory 115 (2017) 168–196

[Paaa ] =

 T    L L Ga

φ

◦ Haa

Iφφ



 T  L T 

 L

  T    R R



∗ ◦ Pφφφ

+ GLa

Ga

+

Iφφ

◦ Haa

Ga

∗ ◦ Pφφφ

Ga

φ

 T  R T 

+ GRa

195

Ga

 R Ga

(C.9)

And the expressions of [Iuu ] and [Puuu ] are as follows T

[Iuu ] = [Gau ] [Iaa ][Gau ] T



(C.10)



T



T



a [Puuu ] = [Gau ] [Gau ] ◦ [Paaa ] [Gau ] + [Gau ] [Iaa ] ◦ [Huu ]





C3. Expression of Hφu φ e e

 3×2×2





The Hessian matrix Hφu φ e e





Hφue φe



1





Hφue φe

 ∂ θ8 ∗ ∂ Guφe

2



 ∂ θ8 ∗ ∂ Guφe ∂ θ9

=⎣

 =

11

11





 ∂ θ8 ∗ ∂ Guφe ∂ θ9

21

12

21

∂ θ9

  ∗ ∂ Guφe  ∂ θ8 ∗ ∂ Guφe ∂ θ9

0 0



12

 ∂ θ8 ∗ ∂ Guφe

−cθ8 sθ9 −sθ8 cθ9

⎡ 3



∂ Guφe

  ∗ ∂ Guφe

=

Hφue φe

is expressed as

  ∗ ∂ Guφe

=⎣





−cθ8 cθ9 s θ8 s θ9





3×2×2

s θ8 s θ9 −cθ8 cθ9







∂ Guφe





∂ θ9

=





=⎣

(C.11)

⎤ 22



22

31

0 −cθ9

  ∗ ∂ Guφe

32

 ∂ θ8 ∗ ∂ Guφe



∂ θ9

(C.13)



−sθ8 cθ9 −cθ8 sθ9 31

(C.12)



32

⎤ ⎦ (C.14)

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