A New Family Of Nakagami-m Parameter Estimators Using Noisy Channel Samples S. Ravi Teja

Rohit Aggarwal

A. K. Chaturvedi

Dept of Electrical Engg, IIT, Kanpur

Dept of Electrical Engg, IIT, Kanpur

Dept of Electrical Engg, IIT, Kanpur

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Abstract — A new family of moment-based mparameter estimators using noisy channel samples is derived. This new class of estimators fits elegantly into the general theory of m-parameter estimation and in a way integrates the noiseless and the noisy cases.

performance of one of the special case closely matches that of the estimator proposed in [9] for 1.5 6 m 6 10 and outperforms the latter for m 6 1.5. Moreover, the special case reduces to the Inverse Normalized Variance (INV) estimator in the noiseless condition. II. System model

I. Introduction The Nakagami-m distribution is one of the most widely used fading channel models in wireless communications. It characterizes the random channel amplitude changes which occur in wireless transmisson environments [1]. The probability density function (pdf) of the Nakagami-m distribution is given by ” “ 2 2r2m−1  m m − mr Ω , r>0 fR (r) = e Γ (m) Ω

where m =

Ω2 E {(r 2 −Ω)2 }  2

(1)

The system model proposed in [8] has been used in deriving the new class of estimators. It is assumed that the transmitted signal is known in the estimation of the fading distribution parameters as is the case when the received signal samples are taken during the transmission of a training sequence. The fading in the channel is assumed slow and flat. The fading signal is corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN), which is independent of the fading. The received signal in the i-th symbol period can be expressed as

is the fading measure with m >

0.5 and Ω = E r is the second moment [1]. The parameter m indicates various fading conditions. For example, when m = 0.5, it represents a deeply fading channel. When m = 1, it represents a Rayleigh fading channel and when m = ∞, it represents a static channel without any fading. Since the value of m measures the channel quality, it is of great importance to obtain an accurate estimate of m in advanced receiver implementations and in channel data analysis. Estimation of m using noiseless channel samples has been studied extensively in [2]-[5]. In [6] and [7], noisy channel samples assuming knowledge of the fading phases were used, and the derived estimators require a sample size as high as 10,000 to achieve reliable performance. In [8], a better moment-based estimator for m using noisy channel samples was developed. This estimator, as a result of its structure needs to use as many as five moments, making it computationally intensive. In [9], a novel moment-based estimator that uses only two moments of lower order had been developed. But the procedure adopted in deriving the estimator is adhoc and involves numerical experiments. We propose a new class of estimators that uses four moments and one of the special cases reduces to only two moments. The approach adopted is completely theoretical and does not involve any adhoc approximations. The

xi (t) = ri ejθi si (t) + wi (t)

(2)

where si (t) is the transmitted signal in the i-th symbol period, ri is the fading amplitude having a Nakagamim distribution, θi is the fading phase and wi (t) is the complex AWGN on the channel with E {wi (t) wi⋆ (τ )} = No δ (t − τ ) where δ (.) is the Dirac delta function. The value of No is assumed known. The absolute value of the normalized correlator output is zi = |ri ejθi + ni |

(3)

where ni is a complex Gaussian random variable with o mean zero and variance 2σi2 = N Ei . In the discussion, the transmitted signals are assumed to be of equal energy, i.e, σi2 = σ 2 and Ei = E. The noisy samples zi will be used to estimate the fading distribution parameters. III. A new family of m-parameter estimators For the system model given above, it was derived in [8] that the n-th order moment of the noisy channel sample, zi , satisfies µn = 2σ 2

 n2

Γ

n 2

+1



m γ+m

m

  γ F m, n2 + 1; 1; γ+m (4)

where F (., .; .; .) is the hypergeometric function [10, eq Ω 9.100], γ = 2σ is the average signal-to-noise ratio 2 (ASNR) and 2σ 2 = NE0 . No is assumed to be known. It can be obtained by sending a "zero" signal symbol and measuring the output power of the receiver filter. We begin with the derivation of a new m parameter estimator using (4). The main difficulty in using (4) straightaway is the fact that hypergeometric function is a complicated infinite power series. Hence, it is not easy to relate the moments using the definition of the form given in (4). But, the hypergeometric series F (a, b; c; z) terminates if either a or b is a negative integer. This prompts us to use the Euler’s identity [10, Eqn 9.131] which states that (c−a−b)

F (a, b; c; z) = (1 − z)

F (c − a, c − b; c; z)

(5)

Using (5) in (4), one can see that µn = 2σ 2

 n2

Γ

n 2

+1



m m+γ

− n2

  γ F 1 − m, − n2 ; 1; γ+m (6)

Now, using the second and fourth-order moments, an estimator for m and Ω is derived as follows Substituting n = 2 in (6) one has, µ2 = 2σ 2 (γ + 1) Using the fact that γ =

Ω 2σ2 ,

(7)

m ˆ IN V =

µ22 µ4 − µ22

(11)

As expected, this is an estimator for the noiseless case. In fact, (11) is the Inverse Normalized Variance Estimator, also called the INV estimator [2]. The approach used above is very restrictive because one can apply it only to even order moments to get fruitful results. In the sequel, we develop a more general method to derive a whole new family of m-parameter estimators. We overcome the limitation of the approach suggested above by using recurrence relationships of hypergeometric functions to derive the new family of estimators. Denote a real number λ (λ > 0). From [10, Eqn 9.137.3], one has (c − b) F (a, b − 1; c; z) + (2b − c + (a − b) z) F (a, b; c; z) + b (z − 1) F (a, b + 1; c; z) = 0

(12)

Using (4) in (12) , we get m(λ + 2)µλ+2 + 2λ2 σ 4 (γ + m)µλ−2 + σ 2 {(λ + 2)[2m(1 + λ + γ) + λγ]}µλ = 0

(13)

we obtain

Ω = µ2 − 2σ 2

(8)

The estimator for Ω is thus given by N

X ˆ= 1 z 2 − 2σ 2 Ω N i=1 i where N is the number of independent and identically distributed samples used in the estimation and zi is the i-th noisy sample. In moment-based estimation, µn is usually approximated by N

Now, substituting n = 4 in (6) one has,  2  γ 2 4 + γ + 4γ + 2 µ4 = 4σ m

(9)

Solving (7) and (9) for m, we obtain 2 µ2 − 2σ 2 (µ4 − µ22 − 4σ 2 µ2 + 4σ 4 )

Using (7) in (13), we obtain    λ µ2 − 2σ 2 µλ − λσ 2 µλ−2 m ˆλ = 2 [µλ+2 + λ2 σ 4 µλ−2 − µλ (2λσ 2 + µ2 )]

(10)

(14)

Hence, a new family of moment-based estimators for m is derived. The new family of estimators requires the computation of four moments in all, namely, µλ , µλ+2 , µλ−2 and µ2 . But, for the special case of λ = 2, it reduces to only two moments, namely, µ2 and µ4 . On substituting λ = 2 in (14), one has m ˆ2 =

1X n µ ˆn = z N i=1 i

m ˆ =

We have, thus, derived a new m-parameter estimator. Interestingly, if we put σ = 0, the above estimator reduces to

2 µ2 − 2σ 2 (µ4 − µ22 − 4σ 2 µ2 + 4σ 4 )

(15)

Interestingly, this estimator is exactly same as m ˆ (10) derived above which in turn has the INV estimator as its noiseless counterpart. Hence, the estimator (10) is successfully generalised. Two completely different approaches have led us to two intimately related solutions, adding to the elegance of the new family of estimators defined by (14). It is important to note that the recurrence relation used in obtaining the new family of estimators as given by m ˆλ is exactly same as the one used in [8]. But, the approach

5

N = 500, ASNR = 13 dB N = 1000, ASNR = 13dB N = 500, ASNR = 20dB N = 1000, ASNR = 20dB CRLB, N = 500 CRLB, N = 1000

4.5 4 root mean square error

developed above uses a different estimator for Ω in deriving the new family of m-parameter estimators. Hence, it applies the same recurrence relation in a much more illuminating manner establishing a sound relationship between the noisy and noiseless cases. This is demonstrated above by deriving the INV estimator as a special case of (14).

3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1

IV. Simulation Results and Discussion

0.5

In this section, the performance of the estimator given by (14) is examined in terms of the normalized sample means and sample root mean square errors (RMSE’s) through simulations. Its performance is examined for different values of λ. We focus mainly on the special case given by (15) because it involves only two moments, greatly simplifying the complexity of the calculations involved. Sample sizes of N = 1000 and N = 500 are used. Noise variances of σ 2 = 0.1 (ASN R = 20dB) and σ 2 = 0.5 (ASN R = 13dB) are used. Values of m ranging from 1 to 20 with a spacing of 0.5 are used. The value of Ω was fixed at 20 in generating the RMSE’s and normalised sample means of m ˆ 2 . The performance of m ˆ 2 is compared with the estimators proposed in [8], denoted henceforth ˆ B2 . by m ˆ B1 and [9], denoted by m

2

root mean square error

1.1

1.05

6

8

10 12 true value of m

14

16

18

20

Fig. 2 shows the RMSE of m ˆ 2 given by (15). Since the CRLB for the noisy channel is not available, the CRLB of the noiseless channel is used as a benchmark. From the graph, one can observe that the degradation in the performance is more accute as ASNR decreases than when the sample size decreases. It can be seen that, for m = 20, the root mean squared error is about 4.8 when ASN R = 13 dB and about 1.8 when ASN R = 20 dB. Therefore, the root mean square error increases as ASN R decreases. lambda = 4 lambda = 3 lambda = 2 lambda = 0.0001

5

1.15

4

Fig. 2. Root-mean-square-error of m ˆ 2 in a noisy Nakagamim fading channel for N = 1000 and N = 500

Estimator of [8], ASNR = 13 dB Estimator of [9], ASNR = 13 dB Proposed estimator, ASNR = 13 dB Proposed estimator, ASNR = 20 dB

1.2

normalized sample mean

0

4 N = 500, 3

ASNR = 13 dB

2

1 1 0 2

4

6

8

10 12 true value of m

14

16

18

20

ˆ B2 in Fig. 1. Normalised sample Means of m ˆ 2, m ˆ B1 and m a noisy Nakagami-m fading channel for N = 500.

Fig. 1 shows the normalized sample mean of m ˆ 2 . Normalized sample mean for a given value of mo is defined as K

1 Xm ˆo K i=1 mo where m ˆ o is the estimated value of mo and K is chosen sufficiently large, so that, the graph is smooth. One can see from the figure that the new estimator m ˆ 2 has a positive bias between 2% and 5% when ASN R = 13 dB, and is less than 1% when ASN R = 20 dB. In general, the bias performance of all the three estimators is comparaˆ B2 for m 6 1. ble. But, m ˆ 2 and m ˆ B1 outperform m

2

4

6

8

10 12 true value of m

14

16

18

20

Fig. 3. Root-mean-square-error of m ˆ 4, m ˆ 3, m ˆ 2, m ˆ 0.0001 in a noisy Nakagami-m fading channel.

In Fig. 3, the performance of m ˆ λ for different values of λ is plotted. It can be seen from the graph that the general performance of the estimator improves as λ decreases, which is very much in accordance with the popular wisdom that lower order moments are more accurate than higher order moments. It should, however, be noted that improvement in the performance of m ˆ λ is extremely small as λ becomes small (i.e λ 6 2 ). In order to demonstrate the same, we also consider the case of λ = 0.0001 which is many orders of magnitude lower than λ = 2. Inspite of such a huge difference, the improvement in performance of m ˆ λ for λ = 0.0001 over the λ = 2 case is not considerable. This could perhaps be explained by the inaccuracy in negative moments, i.e. moments of order less than zero.

newly proposed estimator is comparable to that of the one proposed in [9]. The new class of estimators in having the INV estimator [3] as a special case very elegantly integrates the m-parameter estimation theory for the noisy and the noiseless cases.

5 true value of No 60% of No 140% of No

4.5

root mean square error

4 3.5 3 2.5

N = 500, ASNR = 20 dB

References

2

[1] Nakagami, "The m-distribution- A general formula of intensity distribution of rapid fading", in Statistical M ethods in Radio W ave P ropagation. pp, 3-36, Pergamon Press, Oxford, U.K, 1960.

1.5 1 0.5 0 2

4

6

8

10 12 true value of m

14

16

18

20

Fig. 4. Root-mean-square-error of m ˆ 2 in a noisy Nakagamim fading channel for N = 500 and ASNR = 20 dB when No estimates of different accuracies are used.

Fig. 4 shows the effect of imperfect estimates of No on m ˆ 2 . The RMSE performance degrades as estimation errors occur in the estimation of No . The sensitivity of m ˆ 2 to positive bias in No is more than it is to negative bias, which is expected as performance degrades for larger noise variances.

root mean square error

[4] J.Cheng and N.C. beaulieu, "Generalised moment estimators for the Nakagami fading parameter", IEEE Commun Lett., vol. 6, pp. 144-146, Apr. 2002. [5] Q. T. Zhang, "A note on the estimation of Nakagami-m fading parameter", IEEE Commun Lett., vol. 6, pp. 237-238, June. 2002.

[7] C. Tepedelenlioglu, "Analytical performance analysis of moment-based estimators of the Nakagami parameter", IEEE Conf. on V ehcular T echnology, vol. 3, 2002, pp. 1471-1474.

4 N = 500, 3

[3] J.Cheng and N.C.Beaulieu, "maximum-likelihood based estimation of the Nakagami m parameter", IEEE Commun Lett., vol. 5, pp. 101-103, May. 2001.

[6] J. Cheng and N. C. beaulieu, "Moment-based estmation of the Nakagami-m fading parameter",IEEE P ACRIM Conf. on Comm. Comp. and Signal P roc. vol. 2, 2001, pp. 361-364.

estimator of [9] estimator of [8] proposed estimator for lambda = 2

5

[2] A.Abdi and M.Kaveh, "Performance comparison of three different estimators for the Nakagami m parameter using Monte Carlo simulation",IEEE Commun Lett vol, 4,pp.119-121, APR.2000.

ASNR = 13 dB

[8] Y. Chen and N. C. Beaulieu, "Estimation of Riciean and Nakagami distribution parameters using noisy samples", in P roc. IEEE International Conf. on Commun. (ICC ′ 04), pp. 562566, June 2004.

2

1

0 2

4

6

8

10 12 true value of m

14

16

18

20

Fig. 5. Comparison of the root-mean-sqaure-error perforˆ B2 . mance of m ˆ 2, m ˆ B1 and m

The performance of m ˆ 2 is now compared with the esˆ B2 ). Fig. 5 timators proposed in [8] (m ˆ B1 ) and [9] (m shows the performance of the three estimators. Clearly, ˆ 2 scores over m ˆ B2 is the best among all the three while m ˆ 2 and m ˆ B1 . An interesting observation one can make is, m ˆ B2 for m 6 10 m ˆ B1 closely match the performance of m while m ˆ B2 is extremely good for m > 12. It can also be ˆ B2 for small m (i.e. seen that m ˆ 2 and m ˆ B1 outperform m 6 1.5). The inferior performance of m ˆ 2 as compared to ˆ 2 uses moments m ˆ B2 may be explained by the fact that m of order higher than those used by the latter. V. CONCLUSION It is concluded that the new estimator for the special case of λ = 2 compares closely with the estimator proposed in [9] for 1.5 6 m 6 10 while the latter outperforms the former for m > 10 and the former outperforms the latter for m 6 1.5. In addition, the complexity of the

[9] Yunfei Chen, N. C. beaulieu and Chintha Tellumbara, "Novel Nakagami-m parameter estimator for Noisy Channel Samples", IEEE Commun Lett., vol.5, pp. 417-419. [10] I. S. Gradshteyn and I. M. Ryzhik, Table of Integrals, Series, and Products, Corrected and enlarged edition, Academic Press, Inc.

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