Industrial Revolution and Its Impacts at Home and  Abroad (1880­1920)    Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources   Program of the Collaborative for Educational Services  http://EmergingAmerica.org/TPS     Richard Cairn, Director, Emerging America Program   Collaborative for Educational Services     Primary Source Sets & Resources  Created for Special Education in Institutional Settings  (SEIS)    Introduction:  ​ A rich range of primary sources introduces the Industrial Revolution, exploring  both contributing factors and its impacts.     1. Development of Industry and Its Impacts on People, Communities, and the World  a. CES Primary Source Set:   Overview: ​ The Vanderbilt home contrasts sharply with images of poor, working  children. A political cartoon expresses the unequal struggle between factory  owners (including Vanderbilt) and their workers. Images of disasters point out  some of the human and environmental costs of industrialization. Cartoon, film,  and image explore growing American imperial power in the era.     Title: ​ Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island    http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2011632107/   Annotation: ​ Photo 1980­2006 of Gilded Age (1890s)  house designed by R.M. Hunt. Shows the phenomenal  wealth of capitalist barons such as the Vanderbilt family  from railroads, manufacturing, and other ventures.     Title: ​ Bessie Blitch, 15 years old. Sewing curtains on  machine   http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/nclc.05192/   Annotation:​  Boston. January 29, 1917. Lewis W. Hine.  One of hundreds of photos by reformer Hine to show the  devastating effects of child labor.   

          Title:​  Breaker boys in Kohinor mine, Shenandoah City,  Pa.   http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3a52668/   Annotation: ​ [1891] F.B. Johnston. Photo of nimble young  boys sorting pieces of coal on a shute. Many boys died of  lung disease from inhaling great quantities of coal dust.       Title:​  1,000 May Have Perished When Dam Burst   

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1911­10­01/ed­1/seq­1/  

Annotation: ​ Describes an all too common failing of  industrial technology.    Title: ​ The Johnstown calamity. A slightly damaged house.  New York Tribune, October 1, 1911.   http://www.loc.gov/item/2012646804/   Annotation: ​ New York Tribune, October 1, 1911. The  Johnstown flood was merely one of the most famous of  industrial disasters that brought awareness and impetus  for the Progressives to enact reforms.       Title: ​ Railroad wreck on Long Island Railroad, Fifth  Avenue, Bay Shore, L.I., July 10, 1909.   http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2012649462/   Annotation: ​ Train lines expanded from the 1840s till the  1920s, with a large number of deadly accidents.         2 

          Title: ​ The tournament of today – a set­to between labor  and monopoly   http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/ppmsca.28412/   Annotation:​   (1883). F. Graetz. Chromolithograph political  cartoon claims an unequal contest between workers and  capitalists (described by Library of Congress as Cyrus W.  Field, William H. Vanderbilt, John Roach, Jay Gould, and  Russell Sage).     Title: ​ A thing well begun is half done. Victor Gillam. 1899.   http://www.loc.gov/item/2010651373/   Annotation:​  Political cartoon shows Uncle Sam bringing  more shovels to help President McKinley build the  Panama Canal. Ships of all nations back up, and the  American flag flies over Cuba and other new acquisitions.      Title: ​ Roosevelt’s Rough Riders embarking for  Santiago. 1898.   http://www.loc.gov/item/98501035/   Annotation: ​ Film clip of Teddy Roosevelt and  his dashing cavalry unit leaving for the  Spanish­American War. One of several films of  the Rough Riders.       Title: ​ Welcome! Come In. 1908.     http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1908­04­26/ed­1/seq­1​ /   

  Annotation:​  Image of American battleship returning from  showing the flag and American power overseas. Part of a  collection of articles from the Chronicling America  collection of newspapers:   http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/greatfleet.html​ .   3 

          b. Library of Congress Primary Source Sets:  ■

“The Industrial Revolution in the United States”   http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/primarysourcesets/indust rial­revolution/   Annotation: ​ Includes photos/images of mills, capitalists and workers;  political cartoon; railroad map, reports, and political tracts. Reports by  Hines on cannery workers and Wright from U.S. Department of Labor  offer excellent and accessible contrasts of perspectives.  



“Immigration: Challenges for New Americas”   http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/primarysourcesets/immig ration/   Annotation: ​ Includes images, songs, maps, data, political cartoon, and  more on the period around the turn of the 20th Century. Includes items on  the immigrant experience as well as on opposition to immigration.  



“Children’s Lives at the Turn of the Twentieth Century”   http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/primarysourcesets/childr ens­lives/   Annotation:​  Features photos and other images of children across a  range of socio­economic conditions.  

c. Library of Congress Primary Source­Based Lessons:  ■

“Labor Unions and Working Conditions: United We Stand”   http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/labor/preparation .html   Annotation: ​ Resource galley under “Preparation” presents usable and  engaging  images, documents, and sheet music.  



“Child Labor in America”   http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/child­labor/proce dure.html   Annotation:​  “Procedure” page offers useful approaches to the topic,  featuring images and other accessible primary sources.    

  4 

        ■

“Child Labor and the Building of America”   http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/built/   Annotation:​  similar resources to “Child Labor in America” lesson.  



“African American Identity in the Gilded Age: Two Unreconciled Strivings”  http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/strivings/preparat ion.html   Annotation:​  Includes discussion of the role of African Americans in  industrial America. Student Galleries under “Procedure” offer many  engaging and relevant images. Lesson also includes links to very large  (and therefore complex) yet interesting collections of primary sources.  



“Natural Disasters: Nature’s Fury”    ​ http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/nature/   Annotation:​  Offers compelling images, personal accounts, and songs for  several disasters from the turn of the 20th Century. See “Gallery of  Artifacts” under “Procedures” section. Most or all of these “natural” events  in reality reflect direct environmental impacts of industrialization and  urbanization.  



“Explorations in American Environmental History”    ​ http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/explorations/   Annotation:​  focuses on the conservation movement and the protection of  wild spaces. Presents speeches, reports, images, and engaging  questions.  

 



1880-1920-Industrial_Revolution-CES-TPS-Primary-Source-Set.pdf ...

Page 1 of 5. Industrial Revolution and Its Impacts at Home and. Abroad (18801920). Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources. Program of the ...

728KB Sizes 4 Downloads 140 Views

Recommend Documents

No documents