Unit 1.01!

What is the purpose of school?
 FOCUS WORDS OF THE WEEK

!analyze : (verb) to examine; study! FORMS/RELATED WORDS: analyzes, analyzing, analyzed, analysis, analytical, analyst, reanalyze! __________________________________________________________________________________________ EXAMPLES OF USE: Marge analyzed the word problem to figure out what the word product means.! __________________________________________________________________________________________ TURN AND TALK: What are some other things students analyze? Why?! __________________________________________________________________________________________

!factor : (noun) something that influences the result of something else! FORMS/RELATED WORDS: factors, factor, factoring, factored, factorial! __________________________________________________________________________________________ EXAMPLES OF USE: One factor that teachers use to determine your grade is participation.! __________________________________________________________________________________________ TURN AND TALK: Make a list with your partner of the factors that determine your grades.! __________________________________________________________________________________________

!interpret : (verb) to understand or explain something’s meaning! FORMS/RELATED WORDS: interprets, interpreting, interpreted, reinterpret, interpretation, interpreter! __________________________________________________________________________________________ EXAMPLES OF USE: The train riders interpreted the conductor’s mumbled message to mean the train will be late.! _________________________________________________________________________________!

!!! !!__________________________________________________________________________________________ TURN AND TALK: When was there a time where you interpreted what someone said incorrectly?! !structure : (noun) way that parts of something relate to each other and work together! FORMS/RELATED WORDS: structures, structure, structuring, structured, restructure, structural! __________________________________________________________________________________________ EXAMPLES OF USE: Our school has a structure where the students report to the teachers and the teachers report to the principal.! __________________________________________________________________________________________ TURN AND TALK: What are some different ways a family can be structured?! __________________________________________________________________________________________

!function : (noun) purpose; role; use! FORMS/RELATED WORDS: functions, function, functioning, functioned, dysfunctional, functional ! __________________________________________________________________________________________ EXAMPLES OF USE: One person’s function is to cook, another’s is to do the dishes, and another’s is to be the ! !!__________________________________________________________________________________________ provider. !

TURN AND TALK: What do you think is the function of schools?! __________________________________________________________________________________________

! !

ELA  Launch  (Focus  Word  Introduction)  Teacher  Directions:  

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1.  Write  the  5  focus  words  on  the  board.  (Beck/Snow  #1)   2.  Say  each  word  and  have  class  repeat  chorally.  Introduce  some  alternate  forms  of  the   word  (i.e.  controversy,  controversies,  controversial,  etc.)  and  have  class  chorally   
 repeat.  Clap  out  the  syllables  and  have  class  repeat  and  count  syllables.  (Beck/Snow   #2)   3.  Language acquisition strategy - Model  language  acquisition  strategy  with  each  focus   word.  Encourage  students  to  use  the  focus  words  in  their  responses.  If  they  don’t,   provide  them  with  a  stem  (Beck/Snow  #5).  We  want  to  encourage  the  oral  use  of  the   focus  words,  so  if  students  use  them  incorrectly,  spin  it  back  correctly,  but  do  not  tell   them  they  are  wrong.  Refer  students  to  their  vocabulary  page  to  see  deLinitions,   forms  of  words,  examples  of  use,  and  turn  and  talk  questions  for  each  of  the  words:     a.  analyze  -­‐  Localize  the  term/Meaningful  example  (Beck/Snow  #3).  Has  anyone   ever  taken  a  test  where  they  didn’t  know  what  one  of  the  words  in  the  question   meant?  For  example,  in  math  the  problem  might  ask:  Find  the  product  of  4  x  6.   Even  if  I  didn’t  know  what  the  word  product  means  I  can  analyze,  or  examine,   the  sentence  to  try  and  Ligure  it  out.  After  analyzing  the  problem,  a  student  can   and  Ligure  out  that  product  means  the  answer  to  a  multiplication  problem.  What   are  some  other  things  students  analyze  other  than  word  problems?  Turn  and   talk.     b.  factor-­‐  Localize  the  term/  Meaningful  example  (Beck/Snow  #3).  There  are   many  factors,  or  inLluences,  that  determine  the  grades  on  your  report  card.  One   factor  that  teachers  use  to  determine  your  grade  is  participation.  Make  a  list   with  your  partner  of  some  other  factors  that  determine  your  grades.   c.  interpret  -­‐  Localize  the  term/  Meaningful  example  (Beck/Snow  #3).  I  know   many  of  you  have  rode  on  the  subway  or  a  train.  Have  you  ever  heard  a  voice   come  over  the  loud  speaker  that  sounds  like  this:  mumble  a  sentence  so  students   know  that  the  speaker  is  saying  something  but  not  sure  what  exactly  it  says.  When   that  happens  train  riders  have  to  interpret  what  the  conductor  is  actually   saying!  Usually  riders  can  interpret  the  sentence  to  be  about  a  train  delay,   however  sometimes  we  can  interpret  what  people  are  saying  incorrectly.  Turn   to  your  partner  and  share  a  time  where  you  interpreted  what  someone  said   incorrectly.   d.  structure  -­‐  Localize  the  term/  Meaningful  example  (Beck/Snow  #8).  A  school   building  has  a  physical  structure  which  is  the  way  it  is  designed,  and  it  also  has   an  organizational  structure  which  is  the  way  it  is  the  people  are  organized.  For   example,  our  school  has  a  structure  where  the  students  report  to  the  teachers   and  the  teachers  report  to  the  principal.  Families  are  another  thing  that  can  have   organizational  structure.  What  are  some  different  ways  a  family  can  be   structured?  Turn  and  talk.     e.  function  -­‐  Promote  interaction  between  the  topic  at  hand  and  the  word  (Beck/ Snow  #10).  When  you  think  of  the  word  function,  you  can  think  of  the  word  role   or  job.  At  a  school,  the  principals  main  function  is  to  make  decisions  that  beneLit   the  school.  One  function  of  teachers  is  to  create  lesson  plans  that  are  engaging   for  students.  Schools  themselves  have  an  overall  function,  or  purpose.  What  do   you  think  the  function  of  school  is?  Turn  and  Talk.

ELA  Launch  (Read  Aloud)  Teacher  Directions:  

" "

Introducing  the  focus  words  through  the   
 weekly  passage:  

Join the national conversation!

Which function of a school do you think is more important: learning about facts or preparing you to earn a living?

E H T S I WHAT ? L O O H C S F O E S O P R PU

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1.Read  the  passage  aloud,  stopping  to  ask   debatable  questions  and  elicit  student   responses.  Examples  of  possible  debatable   questions  can  be  found  to  the  left.  

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2.Make  sure  that  students  use  the  words  as  they   respond  to  the  questions.    Provide  question   stems  if  necessary  and  ask  students  to  repeat   back  to  you  if  they  are  struggling  to  place  the   words  in  the  sentence.      

Word Generation - Unit 1.01

Focus Words analyze | factor | function | interpret | structure!

"

WEEKLY PASSAGE Why do we go to school? Some people think the primary goal of education is giving knowledge to students. They feel there is specific information that all kids should know. For instance, they want kids to know what happened in the Revolutionary War and how the food chain works. Others interpret the main role of school as one of preparing students to earn a living. They are most concerned about students learning particular skills, such as reading, writing, and arithmetic. Some argue that schools should introduce a set of shared values, including liberty and justice. They believe this will help students understand the structure of our democratic government. For example, they feel it is important for students to understand that while each of the three branches of government has a different function, the three work together to make sure we all enjoy certain freedoms and live by the same rules.

SERP 2014

Some think schools should teach students to critically analyze what they see, hear, and read. They want students to be able to think carefully about different perspectives, to respect and challenge other viewpoints, and to form their own opinions about issues that affect them. Although many people say that they want kids to be able to think for themselves, students do not always have the freedom to do so in the classroom. What do you think the function of school is? What do you consider the most important factors in providing a good education? Which ingredients are essential in your recipe for a good school?

After reading this article, interpret the author’s perspective on the topic.

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Series 1 - Part A

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wordgeneration.org

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3.Introduce  the  question  of  the  week,  (What  is   the  purpose  of  school?)  and  give  students  3-­‐5   minutes  to  openly  discuss  their  perspectives   with  a  partner,  making  sure  to  use  the  focus   words.      

"

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TEACHER Discussion Questions:"

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‣ What are two different interpretations of the purpose of school?" ‣ Which function of school do you think is the most" important? Why?" ‣ What is an example of a learning activity that teaches students to analyze something?" ‣ What are some of the structures that help schools fulfill their functions?" ‣ What are some of the factors that teachers should consider when preparing a lesson for their students?

Math Lesson Teacher Directions:

" Unit 1.01

What is the purpose of school? PROBLEM OF THE WEEK How do Americans view their public schools? Analyze the three graphs below.The information comes from a telephone survey taken in 1999. What is the proper function of American schools? Should they focus on giving students knowledge, or should they focus on teaching students to think critically?

Knowledge 56%

What is the best class structure for elementary schools? Should top students, average students, and struggling students have separate classes, or should different ability levels be taught together?

Should standardized test scores be a factor in determining the level of funding a school receives?

Separate 54%

Neither 1%

Yes 39% No 57%

Critical Thinking 35%

Both 7%

Don’t Know 1%

Don’t Know 4%

Together 42%

" "

Don’t Know 4%

Option 1: Which of the following is the best interpretation of the data shown in these three graphs? A) B) C) D)

Americans disagree or are divided on major educational issues. Americans agree on major educational issues. Americans want all students to be equally well educated. Americans are disappointed with today’s schools.

""

Option 2: Answer Option 1. Then determine: What is the probability that a person responded YES to both questions: “Schools should focus on giving students knowledge,” AND “Yes” to the question about making standardized test scores a factor in school funding? Answer: The probability is .56 x .39 = .2184, or a 21.84% chance Discussion Question: Many teachers believe that classrooms function more effectively when students are actively involved. In social studies, students might present an analysis of U.S. foreign policy and our relationship to other countries. In Spanish class, students might interpret and act out a play written by a Colombian author. Students prepare and present, while the teacher acts as a guide. Is this kind of structure realistic for a math class? Or, when you’re learning how to multiply or factor numbers, is having a teacher give knowledge by explaining the facts the best option?

"

SERP 2014

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Series 1 - Part A

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wordgeneration.org

1. Focus word recall activity (Repetition through choral call and response Beck/Snow #2) - Ask students, “Who can remember one of the focus words without looking at their WG notebook or the word wall?” Continue until all 5 focus words are recalled. Record on the board. Ask students to repeat each word through choral call and response to practice pronunciation of words. Practice each word in unison, calling on targeted students who would benefit from individual attention (or have students work in pairs to practice pronunciation with each other; then share out). 2. Ask students to think about how one of the five focus words can be used in a math classroom. Turn and talk. Then, share out as a class. (For example, say: “It is important to justify your work when solving mathematical equations.”) 3. Language acquisition strategy (Word associations (phrases/sentences) Beck/Snow #12) Ask students to associate the following displayed comments with a focus word. Remind students that while you have a specific focus word in mind, there could be multiple answers as long as their justification makes sense. Also note that some words may be repeated if they have multiple definitions. The important thing is that they think, discuss, and justify their answer: - It is important to study all parts of a graph closely to accurately answer questions about it. (Analyze) - Different parts of a machine work together to create a product. (Function) - Identify the following: 2x3=6, where 6 is defined as a multiple. What are 2 and 3 defined as? (Factor) - Challenge: Ask students to provide another definition for factor or function. (Variation: have students work in pairs to determine word association or play a matching game where students match word/phrase to correct focus word.) 4. Transition to the WG Math problem of the Sample Matching Game" week. Ask the class to work in groups to Focus Word" Association" Justify Choice" solve Option 1. Function" study the graph" 5. Ask a group to share and justify their answer. Alternatively, ask students to share 2x3" their answers with each other. Then, call on Analyze"" partners to explain each other’s answers. 6. Now ask another group to share and justify Factor" " working in unison their answer using two of the focus words. Then ask another group to use four, then all five and one from a previous week. 7. If time, repeat steps 4-6 for option 2. 8. Summarize by asking students what they think about the WG Debate topic: What is the purpose of school? How might information from the WG math problem of the week be used to justify your opinion?

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Possible Extensions: Below you will find a list of suggested extension or homework activities that you may use with your students. All activities are relevant to the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice and problem-solving strategies which could be used at any point throughout the school year: a. “Ask yourself” questions - Scaffold the WG math problem by having the students “ask themselves” the following questions: 1) What relevant information do I have? 2) What am I trying to figure out? 3) Which strategy should I use to solve this problem? 4) Will creating a chart or table help me? 5) Does my answer make sense? 6) How can I prove my answer is correct? b. Eliminating distractors - Ask students to justify their multiple choice answers AND explain why they eliminated the other three options. This will help students pinpoint possible errors that might lead them to an incorrect answer. c. Justifying an extended response - Ask students to develop a structured short response to the WG math problem. Use a strategy such as F.A.P.E. (Flip it, Answer it, Prove it, Explain it), or R.A.P. (Restate, Answer, Prove) to scaffold student responses. d. Curriculum connection - Ask students to make a connection between the content of this week’s WG math problem and the current curriculum.

Science Lesson Teacher Directions:

" "

Unit 1.01

What Is the Purpose of School? THINKING SCIENTIFICALLY The students in Ms. Kahn’s class are learning how to analyze substances according to their properties. “One important property of a substance is its density,” says Ms. Kahn. “Can anyone tell me what density is?” “Isn’t it sort of like how massive something is?” says Marian. “I mean, that’s not it exactly, but mass is an important factor in density... It’s hard to explain. Density is sort of how tightly mass is packed into something.” “Yeah,” Jamal adds, “density is how much mass a certain volume of something has. Say you have two things that are the same volume, but one has more mass. Then the one that’s the same size but more massive is more dense.” “Right,” says Ms. Kahn. “Density is the ratio of mass to volume. We can write it as an equation, like this...” Ms. Kahn writes d = m/v on the board, then says, “Density equals mass divided by volume. Scientists often compare the density of different substances to water, because water has a density of exactly one gram per milliliter. But don’t take my word for it—see if you can figure out the density of water for yourselves.” Marian and Jamal set out to check the density of water, but each interprets Ms. Kahn’s assignment differently.

Marian puts a graduated cylinder marked off in milliliters on a scale and resets the scale to zero so that it will not count the mass of the cylinder.

Then Marian pours some water into the cylinder and records the volume and mass of the water.

Next, Marian adds some more water and records the volume and mass again.

Finally, Marian calculates the density of water based on her measurements. 10.13g/10mL = 1.013 g/mL 17.91g/17mL = 1.054 g/mL Take the average of the two

17 mL

10 mL

measurements: (1.013 + 1.054) ÷ 2 = 1.034.

""

So the density of water is about 1.034 g/mL

TURN AND TALK: Meanwhile, Jamal goes online and finds the following information on three reliable web sites:

The density of water is 1 g/mL (one gram per milliliter).

Which student do you think got the most accurate answer, Marian or Jamal? ________________ Jamal’s answer is more accurate. (In fact, a gram was originally defined as the mass of one mL of water.) Which student do you think demonstrated the clearest understanding of how science functions, Marian or Jamal? Why?

_____________________________________________

Marian used a scientific, experimental approach to answer the _____________________________________________ question. She showed more scientific thinking. (In a situation where an_____________________________________________ answer can’t simply be looked up, she might be better prepared to find something out for herself.) What might be some reasons for the difference in their answers?

_____________________________________________

Marian could have made errors in her calculations, but in this case, it _____________________________________________ looks like she didn’t. So she must have made slight errors in measurement. _____________________________________________ Her basic approach makes sense, though. SERP 2014

1. Focus word recall activity (Puzzles Beck/Snow #26) - For example, for structure: - I am thinking of a word that describes the way something is organized. - Some experiments have different physical ___________. If time, repeat activity with two other focus words. 2. Ask students to think about how one of the five focus words can be used in a science classroom. Turn and talk. Then share out as a class. (For example: Interpret the data represented in the chart.) 3. Language acquisition strategy (Generating contexts and examples Beck/Snow #21) Divide students into groups of 4 (recommended that groups are prepared prior to class). Ask students to imagine they are detectives investigating a crime scene for clues (similar to the game Clue). To figure out who committed the crime and with what, ask students to generate the following lists. Note that being a detective is similar to being a scientist. - List three factors a detective considers when investigating a crime. - 3 objects a detective would use to closely analyze various structures in a crime scene. - Challenge: Name 1 tool a detective might use that has multiple functions. Ask a representative from each group to share out their lists. 4. Transition to the Thinking Scientifically exercise. Ask the class to work in groups to analyze Ms. Kahn’s experiment and answer the three questions at the bottom of their page. 5. Ask a group to share their answer to each question and to use at least 2 focus words in their responses. Modify this activity as necessary. For example, ask students who benefit from an additional challenge to incorporate all 5 focus words, either individually, with a partner, or as a group. 6. Ask the class to create a T-Chart comparing the process Marian and Jamal went through to conduct Ms. Kahn’s experiment. 7. Summarize by asking students how they feel about the WG Debate topic: What is the purpose of school? How might information from Marian and Jamal’s experiments be used to justify your opinion?

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Series 1 - Part A

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wordgeneration.org

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Possible Extensions: Below you will find a list of suggested extension or homework activities that you may use with your students. Please note that not all extensions are relevant to each science experiment, so be sure to select the ones that will be the most meaningful for your students: a. Identifying variables- Identify the control(s) and variables in the experiment: independent, dependent, and constants. b. State the question- Create a testable question that includes the independent and dependent variables. c. Form a hypothesis- Create a new relevant hypothesis that states the relationship between variables and draws upon given background information. d. Design a procedure- Create a new procedure that reduces the previously identified limitations in the experimental design. e. Graphing- Graph the data and label the independent and dependent variables on the

axes. f. Analyze data- Explain experimental data using two or more of the focus words.

Unit 1.01

What is the purpose of school?
 


DEBATING THE ISSUE

Debate, Moderate, Evaluate.....

"

The function of school is to provide academic instruction, not to teach values and life skills." Write down pro and con arguments based on the article, the WG math lesson, the WG science lesson, as well as ideas that you generate yourself. Use as many focus words as you can. Pro The primary function of schools to provide students with academic information so they can succeed in college and earn a degree. "

"

Colleges care about certain factors when looking at student applications. They care more about their grades and test scores than their personal opinions."

"

Schools can teach students to analyze documents and experiments, they don’t need to teach how to analyze everything they see, hear, and read.

Con Because students spend most of their time in school, a function of school must be teaching them a set of values."

"

Many parents and teachers interpret the main role of school as one to prepare students to be analytical members of society."

"

Social Studies Debate Teacher Directions: (SEE NEXT PAGE FOR STEPS FOR TEACHER DIRECTIONS FOR CONDUCTING DEBATES IN CLASS).

If students are introduced to a set of shared values, it will help them understand the structure of our democratic government.

Note: This week’s topic has been modified to create a clearer pro and con side. Pro- The purpose of schools is to provide academic instruction. Con- The purpose of schools is to provide more than just academic instruction.

" To the left is a sample filled in pro/con chart. "

Encourage students to identify 3 arguments for the pro and 3 arguments for the con.

"

Encourage students to use at least 1 focus word in each of their arguments.

Social Studies Debate Teacher Directions:

"

Unit 1.01!

What is the purpose of school? DEBATING THE ISSUE Word Generation Debate Organizer Who’s who? Pro ______________________

Con ________________________

Moderator ____________________

Evaluator __________________

Moderator Sentence Stems: What I heard you say is… I believe you said … Correct me if I am wrong, but I thought I heard you say… Based on what I heard, I think that you really believe… Do you agree with your opponent’s argument that… Can you provide some evidence to back that up?

Evaluator Tally Sheet (Tally how many focus words each debater and the moderator uses during the debate.) Focus Words

Pro

Previous Weeks Words:

Con

Moderator

1. Focus word recall activity - (Visualizing focus words) - Display 5 images that could be associated with each of the 5 focus words. Remind students that, while you had matches in mind, there can be multiple correct answers. Ask students to turn and talk with their group to match each image with a focus word. Have groups analyze each matching word and image. 2. Language Acquisition Strategy (Example/Non Example Beck/Snow #22) - Say the word analyze. Select students to explain why the example fits with the selected focus word. Examples: - Looking into a microscope at a skin cell. - Young children breaking down a way to defeat a board in Call of Duty. - Looking at a friend’s new outfit as they walk into the school. 3. If necessary, ask students to briefly review the WG article of the week. 4. Pro or Con? - Ask students to turn and talk and share their own opinions on the week’s debate topic: “What is the purpose of school?” Remind students that they can use evidence from the article, the WG math problem, the WG science lesson, or their own experience. 5. Ask groups to share out their arguments using at least two focus words, then four, then all five plus one from a previous week. 6. As students are sharing out arguments, create a T-chart on the board and list 2-3 salient arguments on the pro side and on the con side. Students can use the T-chart as a support during their debates. (See previous page for examples) 7. Explain 4-person debate structure: - Pro - Argues the pro (yes) side of the debate. Tries to use as many focus words as possible (both this week and previous weeks) - Con - Argues the con (no) side of the debate. Tries to use as many focus words as possible (both this week and previous weeks) - Moderator - Uses accountable talk sentence stems to keep the debate going. After pro and con each speak, moderator summarizes arguments and recalls focus words used. - Evaluator - Tallies the number of focus words used by pro, con and evaluator. 8. Hand out and explain debate organizer. Make sure students sit in groups of 4. 9. Model debating with a student. Ask for a student to volunteer to tally on the board and for a student to be a volunteer moderator. The teaching point that you model will change over time based on strengths/weaknesses you saw in the previous week’s lesson (ex. use of transition words, use of accountable talk, stems, body language, analyzing evidence, etc.). 10. Make sure all students have an assigned role. 11. Say, “3,2,1 Debate” and commence simultaneous 4 person debates. Travel around the room listening for the use of focus words. 12. Ask all evaluators to raise their hands. Ask: “Which focus words of the week did you hear most often? What focus words from previous weeks did you hear? Which focus words did you hear least often?”

" "

Alternate Debate Formats - After students get comfortable with the four person debate, try integrating other debate structures, such as:

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Actor/Director - 2 person format. Actor reviews pro and con arguments on the T-chart. Director says “Progo”. Actor says as many arguments as possible using as many focus words as possible. Director says “ConGo”. Actor says “On the other hand” (or uses another thought reverser [however, whereas etc.]) and then begins giving con arguments. Director says stop. Director says “What I heard you say is....” and tries to recall all of the arguments and focus words used.

"

Lightning Round - Label one side of the room pro and one side con. Ask all students to stand. Ask students to walk to the side of the room that they agree with more (pro or con). Give every student a number on the pro side and ask them to remember their number. Give every student a number on the con side. Randomly call out a number (“number 5” for example). Each side huddles up around their number 5’s and gives them tips on arguments and focus words to use for 2 minutes. Number 5s then go to the center of the room and have a mini-debate. Repeat by calling a new number.

Writing Teacher Directions:

" Unit 1.01

What is the purpose of school?! WRITE ABOUT IT!

Use the focus words from this week and previous weeks. Support your position with clear reasons and specific examples. Focus Words analyze | factor | function | interpret | structure!

! _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________

1. Focus word recall activity - Ask the class, “How was the debate in Social Studies yesterday? After debating/moderating/evaluating, what do you think about the topic of the week, ‘What is the purpose of school?’ Turn and talk. Try to use at least three focus words.” Share out. 2.
 Language acquisition strategy (Word Associations Beck/Snow #12) Tell the students to look over the five focus words. Display the following sentences (see answers below): a. Studying, completing all homework assignments, and focusing during class helped me get a 95 on my first math test! b. We were unable to concentrate because there were no established routines and rituals in Mr. Brown’s class. c. I lost my cell phone charger yesterday, so my phone isn’t working. Tell the class, “Match each statement with the associated focus word. Turn and talk.” (Answers: a. factor b. structure/function c. function) 3. Introduce WG free response - Tell the class, “You will now write a short response to the question: What is the purpose of school? You can use evidence from the WG article, the WG math problem, the WG science lesson, the WG debate, or your own experiences. Try to use all five focus words for the week, plus words from previous weeks.” This assignment can change throughout the year depending on the needs of your students or units of study. For example, you can start with simple sentence writing, transition into paragraphs, and then write different types of responses such as: argumentative, informational, narratives, letter to the author, etc. 4. Assess using the Academic Language Rubric - Use the Academic Language rubric below to assess student WG short responses.

"

Disclaimer: this rubric can be supplemented with school-created writing process rubrics.

_________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________

L.6$–$Acquire$and$use$accurately$grade5appropriate$general$academic$and$domain5specific$words$and$phrases;$ gather$vocabulary$knowledge$when$considering$a$word$or$phrase$important$to$comprehension$or$expression.$

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_________________________________________________________________________________________

Emerging$

Developing$$

Proficient$

Exemplary$

_________________________________________________________________________________________

(1)$

(2)$

(3)$

(4)$

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Accuracy$of$Use$I$

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Is!the!word!used!correctly!in! form?$

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Accuracy$of$Use$II$

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Is!the!word!used!correctly!in! context?$

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Frequency$of$Use$I$

_________________________________________________________________________________________

How!many!of!the!words! taught!during'the'week!were! used?!

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Frequency$of$Use$II$ How!many!of!the!words! taught!from!previous'units! were!used?!

!

Rarely!uses! appropriate!form! for!words!

Uses!appropriate! form!for!some! words!

Uses!appropriate! form!for!most! words!

Uses!appropriate!form! for!all!words!

Rarely!uses! Uses!appropriate! appropriate! context!for!some! context!for!words! words!

Uses!appropriate! context!for!most! words!

Uses!appropriate!context! for!all!words!

Uses!no!words!of! the!week!in!task!

Uses!1=2!words!of! the!week!in!task!

Uses!3=4!words!of! the!week!in!task!

Uses!all!words!of!the! week!in!task!

Uses!no!words! from!previous! units!in!task!

Uses!1=2!words! Uses!3=4!words! from!previous!units! from!previous! in!task! units!in!task!

!

!

Uses!5!or!more!words! from!previous!units!in! task!

L.6$–$Acquire$and$use$accurately$grade5appropriate$general$academic$and$domain5specific$words$and$phrases;$ gather$vocabulary$knowledge$when$considering$a$word$or$phrase$important$to$comprehension$or$expression.$

$

!

Accuracy$of$Use$I$ Is!the!word!used!correctly!in! form?$

Accuracy$of$Use$II$ Is!the!word!used!correctly!in! context?$

Frequency$of$Use$I$

$

$

$

Emerging$

Developing$$

Proficient$

Exemplary$

(1)$

(2)$

(3)$

(4)$

Rarely!uses! appropriate!form! for!words!

Uses!appropriate! form!for!some! words!

Uses!appropriate! form!for!most! words!

Uses!appropriate!form! for!all!words!

Rarely!uses! Uses!appropriate! appropriate! context!for!some! context!for!words! words!

Uses!appropriate! context!for!most! words!

Uses!appropriate!context! for!all!words!

Uses!no!words!of! the!week!in!task!

Uses!1=2!words!of! the!week!in!task!

Uses!3=4!words!of! the!week!in!task!

Uses!all!words!of!the! week!in!task!

Uses!no!words! from!previous! units!in!task!

Uses!1=2!words! Uses!3=4!words! from!previous!units! from!previous! in!task! units!in!task!

!

!

How!many!of!the!words! taught!during'the'week!were! used?!

Frequency$of$Use$II$ How!many!of!the!words! taught!from!previous'units! were!used?!

!

Uses!5!or!more!words! from!previous!units!in! task!

1.01 Purpose of School, Teacher.pdf

come over the loud speaker that sounds like this: mumble a sentence so students. know that the speaker is saying something but not sure what exactly it says. When. that happens train riders have to interpret what the conductor is actually. saying! Usually riders can interpret the sentence to be about a train delay,. however ...

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